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Old 12-25-2011, 08:37 PM
Jeffrey Ross
 
Default Boot disk?

Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from (eg
disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to view the
BIOS settings?


The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I need
to rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy access to
the machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do them.


Thanks, Jeff
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Old 12-25-2011, 08:53 PM
Rares Aioanei
 
Default Boot disk?

On 12/25/2011 11:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross wrote:
Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from
(eg disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to
view the BIOS settings?


The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I
need to rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy
access to the machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do
them.


Thanks, Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Try installing dmidecode.


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Old 12-25-2011, 08:53 PM
Rares Aioanei
 
Default Boot disk?

On 12/25/2011 11:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross wrote:
Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from
(eg disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to
view the BIOS settings?


The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I
need to rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy
access to the machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do
them.


Thanks, Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Try installing dmidecode.


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Old 12-25-2011, 09:23 PM
Aaron Konstam
 
Default Boot disk?

On Sun, 2011-12-25 at 23:53 +0200, Rares Aioanei wrote:
> On 12/25/2011 11:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross wrote:
> > Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from
> > (eg disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to
> > view the BIOS settings?
> >
> > The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
> > system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I
> > need to rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy
> > access to the machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do
> > them.
> >
> > Thanks, Jeff
> Hi Jeff,
>
> Try installing dmidecode.
>
>

Sounds like a good suggestion, but where in dmidecode output do you find
the disk that is used for booting.
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Life -- Love It or Leave It.
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Old 12-25-2011, 09:34 PM
Rares Aioanei
 
Default Boot disk?

On 12/26/2011 12:23 AM, Aaron Konstam wrote:

On Sun, 2011-12-25 at 23:53 +0200, Rares Aioanei wrote:

On 12/25/2011 11:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross wrote:

Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from
(eg disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to
view the BIOS settings?

The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I
need to rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy
access to the machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do
them.

Thanks, Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Try installing dmidecode.



Sounds like a good suggestion, but where in dmidecode output do you find
the disk that is used for booting.
I was under the impression that a server machine offers more detailed
info than the
usual desktop (via SMBIOS), but if I'm mistaken, all apologies. I don't
have access to a server

to test my presumptions, though.

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Old 12-25-2011, 10:12 PM
Craig White
 
Default Boot disk?

On Sun, 2011-12-25 at 16:37 -0500, Jeffrey Ross wrote:
> Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from (eg
> disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to view the
> BIOS settings?
>
> The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
> system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I need
> to rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy access to
> the machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do them.
----
you don't say whether this is software or hardware RAID, nor which
version of Fedora you are using (grub or grub2) and I think the
distinctions are rather important and my crystal ball is cloudy today.

Craig


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Old 12-25-2011, 10:14 PM
"T.C. Hollingsworth"
 
Default Boot disk?

On Sun, Dec 25, 2011 at 2:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross <jeff@bubble.org> wrote:
> Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from (eg
> disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to view the
> BIOS settings?
>
> The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
> system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I need to
> rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy access to the
> machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do them.

If both disks have identical bootloaders, I'm not sure there's any way
from a running system to check which one you booted from. If you
don't mind rebooting it, you could add a different arbitrary kernel
argument to the GRUB configuration of each disk's bootloader, reboot
the machine, then check /proc/cmdline to see which one shows up.

That being said, why does the order matter? So long as you do both
correctly before rebooting the machine all should be well.

-T.C.
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Old 12-27-2011, 02:12 PM
 
Default Boot disk?

> On Sun, Dec 25, 2011 at 2:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross <jeff@bubble.org> wrote:
>> Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from (eg
>> disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to view the
>> BIOS settings?
>>
>> The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
>> system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I need
>> to
>> rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy access to
>> the
>> machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do them.
>
> If both disks have identical bootloaders, I'm not sure there's any way
> from a running system to check which one you booted from. If you
> don't mind rebooting it, you could add a different arbitrary kernel
> argument to the GRUB configuration of each disk's bootloader, reboot
> the machine, then check /proc/cmdline to see which one shows up.
>
> That being said, why does the order matter? So long as you do both
> correctly before rebooting the machine all should be well.
>

In this case it turns out it was booting off of sda (which is what I
suspected), I ended up taking a ride down to the datacenter and verifying
the BIOS.

The original question although no longer important remains, can you tell
which disk the initial load occurred from? I did run dmidecode and found
nothing of value.

Thanks, Jeff


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Old 12-28-2011, 06:25 AM
jdow
 
Default Boot disk?

On 2011/12/27 07:12, jeff@bubble.org wrote:

On Sun, Dec 25, 2011 at 2:37 PM, Jeffrey Ross<jeff@bubble.org> wrote:

Is there a way to identify which disk the BIOS is using to boot from (eg
disk 0 or 1) when I don't have physical access to the system to view the
BIOS settings?

The situation is this, I have a machine at a remote location where the
system runs RAID-1 and both disks (0 and 1) can boot the system, I need
to
rewrite the boot sectors on the disks and I don't have easy access to
the
machine so I have to be careful as to which order I do them.


If both disks have identical bootloaders, I'm not sure there's any way
from a running system to check which one you booted from. If you
don't mind rebooting it, you could add a different arbitrary kernel
argument to the GRUB configuration of each disk's bootloader, reboot
the machine, then check /proc/cmdline to see which one shows up.

That being said, why does the order matter? So long as you do both
correctly before rebooting the machine all should be well.



In this case it turns out it was booting off of sda (which is what I
suspected), I ended up taking a ride down to the datacenter and verifying
the BIOS.

The original question although no longer important remains, can you tell
which disk the initial load occurred from? I did run dmidecode and found
nothing of value.

Thanks, Jeff


Jeff, you might get somewhere reading the grub configuration files or out
of fstab. Beyond that it's hard to say. For the fstab route you'd probably
have to check against UUIDs. But that's not too hard. Worst case your dmesg
information right after you boot or in /var/log/dmesg could probably be
decoded to tell you what's up.

{^_^}
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Old 12-28-2011, 10:06 PM
Joel Rees
 
Default Boot disk?

On Wed, Dec 28, 2011 at 12:12 AM, <jeff@bubble.org> wrote:
>[...]
> In this case it turns out it was booting off of sda (which is what I
> suspected), I ended up taking a ride down to the datacenter and verifying
> the BIOS.
>
> The original question although no longer important remains, can you tell
> which disk the initial load occurred from? *I did run dmidecode and found
> nothing of value.

And /dev/sda doesn't really say much, of course.

I often have to remember which drive was how big and made by whom to
untangle this question. That's why you want to use the UUIDs as much
as you can. With the manufacturers, sizes, knowledge of how the RAID
was set up, and UUIDs, you can use /dev/disk/* to figure out what you
need.

Joel Rees
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