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Old 03-26-2008, 06:04 PM
Blake Hudson
 
Default Two Internet connections...

"Shotgun" or multilinking only works because the underlying layer2
support is there by means of PPP so that your layer 3 IP address can
send/rec twice as much data. With two independent physical connections
and IP addresses, the best you can do is a per connection or per
destination load balancing.


If both connections go directly into your PC, use iproute/iproute2 to
create either two default routes or two routes, where by 1 goes to half
of the internet and the other route goes to the other half... You won't
double your bandwidth on web surfing or single file downloads, but
torrents and other distributed content will be able to make use of both
connections.


http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:NfoR4OJXH3oJ:linuxcult.blogspot.com/2006/05/how-can-i-have-two-default-routes.html

-Blake

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Two Internet connections...
From: Frank Cox <theatre@sasktel.net>
To: fedora-list@redhat.com
Date: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 12:47:06 PM

I do some occasional tech work for a cable TV/Internet service provider. They
have now offered me free services, including cable Internet. I currently have a
DSL service through the telephone company and, for several reasons including the
fact that it is really unlimited service with no cap and it comes with newsgroup
access (neither of which the cable service has), I'm not really prepared to
give that up.

However, since I can get a free cable Internet service too I would like to be
able to put that to use.

Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an extra cable Internet
service? Is there, say, a way to somehow "shotgun" two Internet services like
you used to be able to do with dial-up modems to increase your transmission
speed?




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Old 03-26-2008, 06:09 PM
Alan Cox
 
Default Two Internet connections...

> Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an extra cable Internet
> service? Is there, say, a way to somehow "shotgun" two Internet services like
> you used to be able to do with dial-up modems to increase your transmission
> speed?

Not easily. You need BGP4 peering for that and you won't get it

One option is to use a masquerading router set to masq out of two ports
one to each ISP and a script to load a ton of routing table entries in
(eg 1/3/5/7... to ISP 1 2/4/6/8... to ISP 2)

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Old 03-26-2008, 06:27 PM
Frank Cox
 
Default Two Internet connections...

I do some occasional tech work for a cable TV/Internet service provider. They
have now offered me free services, including cable Internet. I currently have a
DSL service through the telephone company and, for several reasons including the
fact that it is really unlimited service with no cap and it comes with newsgroup
access (neither of which the cable service has), I'm not really prepared to
give that up.

However, since I can get a free cable Internet service too I would like to be
able to put that to use.

Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an extra cable Internet
service? Is there, say, a way to somehow "shotgun" two Internet services like
you used to be able to do with dial-up modems to increase your transmission
speed?


--
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Old 03-26-2008, 06:50 PM
"David G. Mackay"
 
Default Two Internet connections...

On Wed, 2008-03-26 at 11:47 -0600, Frank Cox wrote:
> Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an extra cable Internet
> service? Is there, say, a way to somehow "shotgun" two Internet services like
> you used to be able to do with dial-up modems to increase your transmission
> speed?

You can do load balancing, sort of. Take a look at the Adv-Routing
howto for details. One thing that you'll want to make sure of is that
your email traffic goes out the appropriate interface. If you try and
access your ISP's mail servers through the cable company interface,
you'll most likely get the traffic rejected.

Dave


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Old 03-26-2008, 06:55 PM
Scott Silva
 
Default Two Internet connections...

on 3-26-2008 12:27 PM Frank Cox spake the following:

I do some occasional tech work for a cable TV/Internet service provider. They
have now offered me free services, including cable Internet. I currently have a
DSL service through the telephone company and, for several reasons including the
fact that it is really unlimited service with no cap and it comes with newsgroup
access (neither of which the cable service has), I'm not really prepared to
give that up.

However, since I can get a free cable Internet service too I would like to be
able to put that to use.

Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an extra cable Internet
service? Is there, say, a way to somehow "shotgun" two Internet services like
you used to be able to do with dial-up modems to increase your transmission
speed?


Bonding will only work if the connections terminate at the same place on BOTH
ends. Since you are basically using 2 ISP's, that won't work.
If you can find a load balancing router someplace, it can send different
connections out different ports and keep track of what goes where. But the
cost won't be cheap, and I don't know of any consumer level routers that do
this. You might be able to get it working with Vyatta and a dedicated computer
with multiple ethernet ports.


--
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You hope everybody uses it, and
you notice quickly if they don't!!!!

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Old 03-26-2008, 07:08 PM
Timothy Selivanow
 
Default Two Internet connections...

On Wed, 2008-03-26 at 13:27 -0600, Frank Cox wrote:
> I do some occasional tech work for a cable TV/Internet service provider. They
> have now offered me free services, including cable Internet. I currently have a
> DSL service through the telephone company and, for several reasons including the
> fact that it is really unlimited service with no cap and it comes with newsgroup
> access (neither of which the cable service has), I'm not really prepared to
> give that up.
>
> However, since I can get a free cable Internet service too I would like to be
> able to put that to use.
>
> Does anyone have any good ideas for what to do with an extra cable Internet
> service? Is there, say, a way to somehow "shotgun" two Internet services like
> you used to be able to do with dial-up modems to increase your transmission
> speed?


The only way that you would be able to use them is a semi-load-balancing
formation. What I mean by "semi" is that all traffic that exits one
interface will always return to that one. Also, an entire transaction
will go over only one of the lines, meaning you will only get the
throughput of one line at a time.

The only way to "shotgun" (an ISP had to specifically support modem
shotgunning in the olden days, BTW), i.e. do aggregate routing, is if
you had a separate routed sub-net and ran BGP on the router connected to
the two lines (The rest of the internet has to know that you have two
lines and both are available to use, concurrently). Needless to say,
this can be complicated, and is not considered a "consumer" setup (most
providers will require it to be some sort of business type connection
like, T and OC connections, which can be on the order of thousands a
month, hundreds for a "fractional" T connection).

If the the first is acceptable, there are a number of docs like
<http://www.samag.com/documents/s=1824/sam0201h/0201h.htm> that would
help (I just did a google search for "balance two internet connections
linux", first link) and guides that set up a redundant line also should
help (it is actually what you are doing, but actively using the
"redundant" line also). I hope that addresses what you are asking
about.


--Tim
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:18 PM
Timothy Selivanow
 
Default Two Internet connections...

On Wed, 2008-03-26 at 13:08 -0700, Timothy Selivanow wrote:
> Also, an entire transaction will go over only one of the lines,
> meaning you will only get the throughput of one line at a time.

I forgot to mention that independent applications (therefor many
independent connections) won't use just one connection, i.e. both
connections will be used from the holistic view of a workstation, but a
single transaction (think doing a wget for a single file) will always be
tied to a single line because of the way that TCP/IP works.
Applications that make many connections (think BitTorrent) would
theoretically use both.

--Tim
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:22 PM
Frank Cox
 
Default Two Internet connections...

On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 13:08:58 -0700
Timothy Selivanow <timothy.selivanow@virtualxistenz.com> wrote:

> The only way that you would be able to use them is a semi-load-balancing
> formation. What I mean by "semi" is that all traffic that exits one
> interface will always return to that one. Also, an entire transaction
> will go over only one of the lines, meaning you will only get the
> throughput of one line at a time.

That's pretty much what I had in mind.

I'm thinking that this sort of setup can't be too uncommon in "big" small
business networks. An office with 600 networked computers won't be sucking on
one measly DSL line, but they might be using ten at a total cost that's less
than a high-capacity dedicated connection.

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Old 03-26-2008, 07:35 PM
"Ross S. W. Walker"
 
Default Two Internet connections...

Frank Cox wrote:
> On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 13:08:58 -0700
> Timothy Selivanow <timothy.selivanow@virtualxistenz.com> wrote:
>
> > The only way that you would be able to use them is a semi-load-balancing
> > formation. What I mean by "semi" is that all traffic that exits one
> > interface will always return to that one. Also, an entire transaction
> > will go over only one of the lines, meaning you will only get the
> > throughput of one line at a time.
>
> That's pretty much what I had in mind.
>
> I'm thinking that this sort of setup can't be too uncommon in "big" small
> business networks. An office with 600 networked computers won't be sucking on
> one measly DSL line, but they might be using ten at a total cost that's less
> than a high-capacity dedicated connection.

Frank,

If you had 2 Internet firewalls each with their own default route, each
doing NAT. On each of these firewalls you had a squid process running
proxying requests and chaining requests from one squid to the other
depending either on, request content, firewall load or Internet
availability. Then you would have some resemblence of un-bonded
load balanced Internet connections.

You could run a Xen box with 2 domUs each a firewall with squid and
ran another squid process in dom0 that would chain to the best of
the others on that box. You could even do some fancy routing with
gated where you would have a primary default route and a backup
default route advertised to dom0 and if the connectivity on any
of the domUs goes down, have it stop advertising it's default
route. Then have dom0 advertise itself as the default route on
the local LAN.

-Ross

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Old 03-26-2008, 07:47 PM
Timothy Selivanow
 
Default Two Internet connections...

On Wed, 2008-03-26 at 16:35 -0400, Ross S. W. Walker wrote:

> If you had 2 Internet firewalls each with their own default route, each
> doing NAT. On each of these firewalls you had a squid process running
> proxying requests and chaining requests from one squid to the other
> depending either on, request content, firewall load or Internet
> availability. Then you would have some resemblence of un-bonded
> load balanced Internet connections.

That would work for pure HTTP traffic, but I would think you'd want more
than that and the kernel routing algo's should be more than sufficient
(in comparison to a crazy squid setup


--Tim
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