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Old 11-24-2011, 04:01 PM
Alexander Volovics
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On 24-11-2011 17:48, Linux Tyro wrote:
> Hi,
>
> As I have liked Linux (yes, I am windows convert), so with 2 GB RAM
> and 250 GB hard-disk, I am now going to make hard-disk penta boot as
> follows:-
>
> Fedora - 20 GB - installing it, - /root (20 GB)
> openSUSE - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Ubuntu - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Debian - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Mint - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>
> /home - 190 GB (remaining space)
>
> In this scenario, I have just few doubts:
>
> While suppose I first install Fedora, I have to use /root for 20 GB,
> /home for 190 GB (which automatically becomes Logical partition...?)
> or should I make both primary and logical other distros...?
>
> Similarly proceeding with all distros, and allocating space from the
> unallocated ones, okay but installed other distros would come in
> Extended...(obviously...?)
>
> After final installation, which distros would govern the booting menu?
> Since some may have GRUB2 and others may have GRUB Legacy, so changing
> one file might disturb the other or vice-versa? Or is it like that if
> I have installed /root (Fedora) at first, so only /boot/grub/menu.lst
> of Fedora would govern the hard-disk and the changes made in this file
> would be done automatically with other installed distros too...Trying
> this new geeky way of installation but I have no prior experience
> since earlier I had installed only two distros - Fedora dual booted
> with Windows, but now I am trying to remove Windows completely and
> installed these distros.... Any suggestions....welcome....Thanks.

Something like this is possible. But you will be making things
needlessly difficult for yourself,

Why not just burn the live CD's so you can explore the distros
at your leisure and then choose the one you like most to work
and learn. And depending on which DE you choose Ubuntu/Mint
and Fedora/OpenSuse are not all that different.

Alexander




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Old 11-24-2011, 04:07 PM
Chris Tyler
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On Thu, 2011-11-24 at 11:48 -0500, Linux Tyro wrote:
> Hi,
>
> As I have liked Linux (yes, I am windows convert), so with 2 GB RAM
> and 250 GB hard-disk, I am now going to make hard-disk penta boot as
> follows:-
>
> Fedora - 20 GB - installing it, - /root (20 GB)
> openSUSE - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Ubuntu - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Debian - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Mint - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>
> /home - 190 GB (remaining space)

Another option would be to have /boot partitions for each OS (small --
500 MB max) and do everything else in LVM. This gives you the
flexibility to increase or decrease the size of the various filesystems
easily without repartitioning.

-Chris

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Old 11-24-2011, 08:15 PM
Ed Greshko
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On 11/25/2011 12:48 AM, Linux Tyro wrote:
> Hi,
>
> As I have liked Linux (yes, I am windows convert), so with 2 GB RAM
> and 250 GB hard-disk, I am now going to make hard-disk penta boot as
> follows:-
>
> Fedora - 20 GB - installing it, - /root (20 GB)
> openSUSE - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Ubuntu - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Debian - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
> Mint - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>
> /home - 190 GB (remaining space)
>
> In this scenario, I have just few doubts:
>

I have several comments/questions....

Is it your intention to share /home with all the distributions? I see a
danger ahead since various configuration files in your home directory
will be shared and the distros may not be at the same levels for the
various applications you plan to use. This may lead to very big
headaches and really weird problems.

What is the purpose for doing all of this? Is it just to play with each
distro? That is, not really work? If that is the case, then maybe
you'd be better off using one distro and then having VM's for the others.

I'm a bit surprised you're loading up OpenSuse. You seemed to have just
left the OpenSuse mailing list after having getting into a dust-up over
the purpose of the mailing list. Your last message on OpenSuse was
"Goodbye OpenSuse". Do you still plan to use it and just have given up
on the OpenSuse community?


--
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Old 11-25-2011, 05:31 AM
Linux Tyro
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On Thu, Nov 24, 2011 at 4:15 PM, Ed Greshko <Ed.Greshko@greshko.com> wrote:

> What is the purpose for doing all of this? *Is it just to play with each
> distro? *That is, not really work? *If that is the case, then maybe
> you'd be better off using one distro and then having VM's for the others.

Well the purpose is to know the things, it would however,be done on the holiday.

> I'm a bit surprised you're loading up OpenSuse. *You seemed to have just
> left the OpenSuse mailing list after having getting into a dust-up over
> the purpose of the mailing list. *Your last message on OpenSuse was
> "Goodbye OpenSuse". *Do you still plan to use it and just have given up
> on the OpenSuse community?

I am using mainly Fedora, openSUSE would be a second installation, it
is just trials. Goodbye 'openSUSE' doesn't mean that one cannot
reinstall it but yes, it is not the main installation, which is Fedora
and it is the one which could occupy the hard-disk in majority.....

I am playing with all these on holidays since I heard some one saying,
'The more you do practice with your hands, the better you know abt the
stuff'.

Said that, I don't know which distributions' /boot/grub/menu.lst would
actually govern? Since editing one would have essentially changes in
the other too? I don't know but I am guessing to not go with LVM right
now, but only in the Extended partition.....(I hope, a better
strategy....).

Sharing /home would, I guess not a problem, since I would be giving
different user names in each distributions.

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Old 11-25-2011, 05:39 AM
Joe Zeff
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On 11/24/2011 10:31 PM, Linux Tyro wrote:
> Sharing /home would, I guess not a problem, since I would be giving
> different user names in each distributions.

You guess wrong, I think. Linux doesn't keep track of users by their
username, but by their userid. That means that all of your users would
have the same userid, even though they had different home directories,
and I'm not sure how well that's going to work.
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Old 11-25-2011, 06:04 AM
Ralf Corsepius
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On 11/24/2011 06:07 PM, Chris Tyler wrote:
> On Thu, 2011-11-24 at 11:48 -0500, Linux Tyro wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> As I have liked Linux (yes, I am windows convert), so with 2 GB RAM
>> and 250 GB hard-disk, I am now going to make hard-disk penta boot as
>> follows:-
>>
>> Fedora - 20 GB - installing it, - /root (20 GB)
>> openSUSE - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>> Ubuntu - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>> Debian - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>> Mint - 10 GB installing with /root (10 GB)
>>
>> /home - 190 GB (remaining space)
>
> Another option would be to have /boot partitions for each OS (small --
> 500 MB max) and do everything else in LVM. This gives you the
> flexibility to increase or decrease the size of the various filesystems
> easily without repartitioning.

In a similar setup, I use cascaded/chain-loaded grubs.

I.e. I have a "master grub" /boot partition, which chainloads indivdual
"boot" partitions of other OSes.

I.e. my partitioning basically looks like this:
/dev/sda1 boot (master grub partition, contains only grub).

/dev/sda<N> OS<N>'s /boot
/dev/sda<N+1> OS<N>'s swap
/dev/sda<N+2> OS<N>'s /

/dev/sda<M> OS<M>'s /boot
/dev/sda<M+1> OS<M>'s swap
/dev/sda<M+2> OS<M>'s /
...

Due to the "smartness" of some OSes/Linux distros' installers, setting
up this is quite tricky. The advantage of this setup is that it keeps
all OS's bootloaders independent and avoids interferences between them.

I had used LVN for a long time in this kind of setup, but it has shown
to be more of a nuissance than being helpful and meanwhile removed it.

Shareing /home only works to some extend, because all OSes/Linux distros
carry some amount of incompatibility inside of their "per-user
configurations", which may cause problems when switching betwen OSes.

Ralf

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Old 11-25-2011, 06:18 AM
Tim
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

Linux Tyro:
>> Sharing /home would, I guess not a problem, since I would be giving
>> different user names in each distributions.

Joe Zeff:
> You guess wrong, I think. Linux doesn't keep track of users by their
> username, but by their userid. That means that all of your users would
> have the same userid, even though they had different home directories,
> and I'm not sure how well that's going to work.

The username is usually used to set the filepath, so each home would be
a different directory. So there shouldn't be a conflict of
configuration files, each OS would use its own homespace and own
configuration files.

If they get the same userid, he'll be able to easily read files he's
saved in the other directories.

To share a homespace between different releases can be a problem, and he
easiest solution can be to make sure that they each have different
homespaces, but have link to a (different) common space for the user to
store their own files in. That keeps configuration files separate, and
simple access to your files.

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r
2.6.27.25-78.2.56.fc9.i686

Don't send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored. I
read messages from the public lists.



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Old 11-25-2011, 07:33 AM
Ed Greshko
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On 11/25/2011 02:31 PM, Linux Tyro wrote:
> On Thu, Nov 24, 2011 at 4:15 PM, Ed Greshko<Ed.Greshko@greshko.com> wrote:
>
>> What is the purpose for doing all of this? Is it just to play with each
>> distro? That is, not really work? If that is the case, then maybe
>> you'd be better off using one distro and then having VM's for the others.
> Well the purpose is to know the things, it would however,be done on the holiday.

I see.... Do you mean "holiday" or "weekend"? :-)

Where in India do you live? Have you had any luck in finding a LUG near
you as was suggested a while back? I as that since you've said you are
a "beginner", you have chosen a pseudonym to reflect that, and it just
seemed that you'd benefit from that type of one-on-one environment.
Years ago I ran an LUG internal to a company and it helped the new hires
learn the ins and outs.

>> I'm a bit surprised you're loading up OpenSuse. You seemed to have just
>> left the OpenSuse mailing list after having getting into a dust-up over
>> the purpose of the mailing list. Your last message on OpenSuse was
>> "Goodbye OpenSuse". Do you still plan to use it and just have given up
>> on the OpenSuse community?
> I am using mainly Fedora, openSUSE would be a second installation, it
> is just trials. Goodbye 'openSUSE' doesn't mean that one cannot
> reinstall it but yes, it is not the main installation, which is Fedora
> and it is the one which could occupy the hard-disk in majority.....

Of course you can install openSuse. I'm just surprised that, being a
beginner, you'd install that distro when their community seemed a bit
hostile when it came to, what they felt, were basic questions that could
be easily answered by doing a bit of research.
>
> I am playing with all these on holidays since I heard some one saying,
> 'The more you do practice with your hands, the better you know abt the
> stuff'.

Well, as a beginner, aren't you concerned that you'll be dividing up
your time too much so that you'll not become proficient in one area and
that you'll confuse the way things are done among the distros?

> Said that, I don't know which distributions' /boot/grub/menu.lst would
> actually govern? Since editing one would have essentially changes in
> the other too? I don't know but I am guessing to not go with LVM right
> now, but only in the Extended partition.....(I hope, a better
> strategy....).
>
> Sharing /home would, I guess not a problem, since I would be giving
> different user names in each distributions.

I'm sure others will be better at guiding you to a working configuration
that you think you want.

I still like using VM's for my "alternate" distros as it is easy to take
snap shots as you muck around and you can have multiple distros up and
running at the same time so you can compare things. Also, when and if
you get tired of a particular distro you just delete the VM's. Makes
redistribution of empty space a whole lot easier.

Good Luck....

--
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speak it to? -- Clarence Darrow
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Old 11-25-2011, 10:27 AM
Ian Malone
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On 25 November 2011 08:33, Ed Greshko <Ed.Greshko@greshko.com> wrote:
> On 11/25/2011 02:31 PM, Linux Tyro wrote:
>> On Thu, Nov 24, 2011 at 4:15 PM, Ed Greshko<Ed.Greshko@greshko.com> *wrote:
>>
>>> What is the purpose for doing all of this? *Is it just to play with each
>>> distro? *That is, not really work? *If that is the case, then maybe
>>> you'd be better off using one distro and then having VM's for the others.

> Well, as a beginner, aren't you concerned that you'll be dividing up
> your time too much so that you'll not become proficient in one area and
> that you'll confuse the way things are done among the distros?

> I still like using VM's for my "alternate" distros as it is easy to take
> snap shots as you muck around and you can have multiple distros up and
> running at the same time so you can compare things. *Also, when and if
> you get tired of a particular distro you just delete the VM's. *Makes
> redistribution of empty space a whole lot easier.
>

I agree with this, it doesn't matter /too/ much which distribution
Linux Tyro actually goes with if you want to get general experience in
using Linux. Having lots of different distributions installed you'll
find that you:
1. End up doing lots of admin tasks on all of them. On this list we
tend to deal with lots of Fedora issues (e.g. not liking Gnome3, use
XFCE instead, problems with SELinux), but other distros will have
their own problems. With five distros you could potentially end up
doing five times as much of this annoying problem solving stuff. That
might be exactly the experience you're looking for or it might get in
the way of doing more interesting stuff. However...
2. You'll probably end up using one over the others. I had to break
into the windows install on my laptop last month because it turned out
I hadn't actually booted it into windows for two years and had
forgotten the password.

Picking one and going with VMs for the others as Ed Greshko suggests
is probably a good compromise, unless you really want to investigate a
good way of getting so many systems to boot together happily.

--
imalone
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Old 11-25-2011, 03:04 PM
Linux Tyro
 
Default penta-booting hard-disk: who would administer the hard-disk office?

On Fri, Nov 25, 2011 at 3:33 AM, Ed Greshko <Ed.Greshko@greshko.com> wrote:

> Where in India do you live? *Have you had any luck in finding a LUG near
> you as was suggested a while back? *I as that since you've said you are
> a "beginner", you have chosen a pseudonym to reflect that, and it just
> seemed that you'd benefit from that type of one-on-one environment.

I live in the Northern part of India. Well out of the job getting time
for LUG is typical still I would have to find the one to know the
geeky ways around the computers, that's of much enhanced curiosity.

> Years ago I ran an LUG internal to a company and it helped the new hires
> learn the ins and outs.

You do still ran that? How often you come to India or you have ever been to?

> Of course you can install openSuse. *I'm just surprised that, being a
> beginner, you'd install that distro when their community seemed a bit
> hostile when it came to, what they felt, were basic questions that could
> be easily answered by doing a bit of research.

Yeah, I could have Googled but that showed me terrific results and for
a newbie, it was painful so I got afraid in the beginning.

> Well, as a beginner, aren't you concerned that you'll be dividing up
> your time too much so that you'll not become proficient in one area and
> that you'll confuse the way things are done among the distros?

Good suggestion but as a beginner I just wanted to play with the
distros for which I am downloading the LIVE CDs too and yes you are
correct, I should stick with Fedora so that I can get the grip of one
that I am using, a better way, I agree.

> I'm sure others will be better at guiding you to a working configuration
> that you think you want.

Oh, okay.

> I still like using VM's for my "alternate" distros as it is easy to take
> snap shots as you muck around and you can have multiple distros up and
> running at the same time so you can compare things. *Also, when and if
> you get tired of a particular distro you just delete the VM's. *Makes
> redistribution of empty space a whole lot easier.

Okay VM, hmmm, but I guess we lose some functionality in VM, however,
this is just a newbie guess.....Rather, if Live CD is there, why not
to play around a few and then see...?

On Fri, Nov 25, 2011 at 6:27 AM, Ian Malone <ibmalone@gmail.com> wrote:

> I agree with this, it doesn't matter /too/ much which distribution
> Linux Tyro actually goes with if you want to get general experience in
> using Linux.

Yeah, going with both - Fedora and openSUSE.

> Having lots of different distributions installed you'll
> find that you:
> 1. End up doing lots of admin tasks on all of them. On this list we
> tend to deal with lots of Fedora issues (e.g. not liking Gnome3, use
> XFCE instead, problems with SELinux), but other distros will have
> their own problems. With five distros you could potentially end up
> doing five times as much of this annoying problem solving stuff. That
> might be exactly the experience you're looking for or it might get in
> the way of doing more interesting stuff. However...

That's just a holiday play to see the geeky way, if it works out or
not! However, I am sure that I would come back to the end with three
options - Scientific Linux (and that's why Fermi Lab, CERN are using
it!!), and Fedora and openSUSE

> 2. You'll probably end up using one over the others.

I agree this fact.

> I had to break into the windows install on my laptop last month because it turned out
> I hadn't actually booted it into windows for two years and had
> forgotten the password.

, Windows people don't prefer now a days, I guess so.... less
secured, without a doubt!

> Picking one and going with VMs for the others as Ed Greshko suggests
> is probably a good compromise,

But I know it is for sure a compromise only!

> unless you really want to investigate a
> good way of getting so many systems to boot together happily.

Yeah sure.

Thanks.
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