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Old 03-21-2008, 03:08 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default PCI VIDEO CAPTURE CARDS for Fedora

Hi
all,
*
I am wondering if
members here would advise on a great
video capture card
one can use for survellance and other
uses (such as
capturing a telescope data for astronomy) that
supports many
cameras in real-time (all/most channels active)
and also supports
remote/local viewing with protocols for
supporting full
tilt/motion/zoom.* As for the camera itself,
I'd like to have at
least one that not only supports full tilt/motion/zoom
but can also might
support 0 lux, color, but perhaps also support
IR/uV as cheaply as
possible?* Yeah, I know it might be
too expensive for my
budget but hey, I'd like to know what
my options are!

*
I just happened to
find something like:
*
Lorex 16 Port PCI
Card Digital Video Recorder - 120
FPS*
Model No: QLR1660


Features:


16 channel (camera) triplex PC card solution (view, record, playback
simultaneously)
Local and Remote internet Monitoring Capability
Digital Recording of live video to PC’s hard drive
View up to 16 locations simultaneously
Compatible with Windows operating system
1 / 8 / 16 / Full Screen / Sequencing
Individual selection of security alarm features
Digital freeze and zoom-in
Easy search and playback of digitally recorded video
Password security protection
External alarm option

Minimum System Requirements:


Pentium 4 - 1.6 GHz or higher processor
Microsoft Windows operating system
Optical drive
256 MB RAM
Separate video card with 64MB minimum (broadband connection required for
remote connection)

Features:


16 channel (camera) triplex PC card solution (view, record, playback
simultaneously)
Local and Remote internet Monitoring Capability
Digital Recording of live video to PC’s hard drive
View up to 16 locations simultaneously
Compatible with Windows operating system
1 / 8 / 16 / Full Screen / Sequencing
Individual selection of security alarm features
Digital freeze and zoom-in
Easy search and playback of digitally recorded video
Password security protection
External alarm option

Minimum System Requirements:


Pentium 4 - 1.6 GHz or higher processor
Microsoft Windows operating system
Optical drive
256 MB RAM
Separate video card with 64MB minimum (broadband connection required for
remote connection)


Supports 16 cameras and 4 assignable audio
channels
Supports pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras with Pilco D
or equivalent protocol
Supplied software enables local network and remote
internet access
120fps recording speed
PC requires 62MB or larger video card, 20GB
available HD space and a 1.3GHz CPU
Includes Lorex™ application software
CD
*
Notice above Pilco D
or equivalent protocol...
Is this a
propreitary protocol or supported under Fedora???
*
It is also not clear
how to 'breakout' the 16-channel inputs
to support other
interfaces supporting other camera devices
such as camcorders,
webcams, VCR, MXC, S-? and so on.
*
and this card is
priced near $300.00 at bargain rates, or
so it
seems...
*
Also, this card may
be obsolete (at least it is no longer in
the Lorex website)
and there is very little information as
to programming the
card for local use (such as motion
detection, for
example) - but this is just one that I found
at the
moment.
*
Perhaps there are
better cards out there?
*
Does anyone have any
advice as to the card/camera that
would be great for
use under Linux/Fedora?
*
Thanks!
Dan




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Old 03-23-2008, 01:24 PM
Sur
 
Default PCI VIDEO CAPTURE CARDS for Fedora

* Daniel B. Thurman wrote, On 03/21/2008 06:08 PM:


Hi all,

I am wondering if members here would advise on a great

video capture card one can use for survellance and other
uses (such as capturing a telescope data for astronomy) that
supports many cameras in real-time (all/most channels active)
and also supports remote/local viewing with protocols for
supporting full tilt/motion/zoom. As for the camera itself,
I'd like to have at least one that not only supports full tilt/motion/zoom
but can also might support 0 lux, color, but perhaps also support
IR/uV as cheaply as possible? Yeah, I know it might be
too expensive for my budget but hey, I'd like to know what
my options are!

I just happened to find something like:

Lorex 16 Port PCI
Card Digital Video Recorder - 120 FPS
Model No: QLR1660




I suppose this is it:
http://dealscctv.lorextechnology.com/product.aspx?id=1756

[...]

It is also not clear how to 'breakout' the 16-channel inputs

to support other interfaces supporting other camera devices
such as camcorders, webcams, VCR, MXC, S-? and so on.


It's explained in the manual at the URI above.
Only PAL/NTSC video is accepted (analog signal).


and this card is priced near $300.00 at bargain rates, or

so it seems...


Even at $499, it seems like a good deal to me.


Also, this card may be obsolete (at least it is no longer in

the Lorex website) and there is very little information as
to programming the card for local use (such as motion
detection, for example) - but this is just one that I found
at the moment.

Perhaps there are better cards out there?

Does anyone have any advice as to the card/camera that

would be great for use under Linux/Fedora?



A frame grabber supported under Linux is most probably based on Bt8xx chip.






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