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Old 08-22-2011, 03:38 AM
Robert Arkiletian
 
Default high i/o dirs

Rebuilding an nfs fileserver. I want to put the high i/o directories
on a separate raid 1 array for performance. Currently everything is
under / in one raid 10 array.
How can I tell which directories, obviously other than /home, are
getting high reads and/or writes? Any tools to measure read/write i/o
per directory?

Thanks


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Robert Arkiletian
Eric Hamber Secondary, Vancouver, Canada
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Old 08-26-2011, 12:44 AM
Cameron Simpson
 
Default high i/o dirs

On 21Aug2011 20:38, Robert Arkiletian <robark@gmail.com> wrote:
| Rebuilding an nfs fileserver. I want to put the high i/o directories
| on a separate raid 1 array for performance. Currently everything is
| under / in one raid 10 array.
| How can I tell which directories, obviously other than /home, are
| getting high reads and/or writes? Any tools to measure read/write i/o
| per directory?

Since nobody else has replied, perhaps you should look at the
inotifywatch command. Disclaimer: I've never used it.

"man inotifywatch" says:

DESCRIPTION
inotifywatch listens for filesystem events using Linux's inotify(7)
interface, then outputs a summary count of the events received on
each file or directory.

OUTPUT
inotifywatch will output a table on standard out with one column for
each type of event and one row for each watched file or directory.
The table will show the amount of times each event occurred for
each watched file or directory. Output can be sorted by a particular
event using the -a or -d options.

Looks promising.

You might also consider what fielsystem to use for your new partition.
For example, XFS makes a deliberate attempt to store files physically
close to their directories for performance reasons.

Cheers,
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Cameron Simpson <cs@zip.com.au> DoD#743
http://www.cskk.ezoshosting.com/cs/

Microsoft - where "cross platform" means "runs in both Win95 and WinNT".
- Andy Newman <andy@research.canon.com.au>
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