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Old 07-25-2011, 04:52 AM
yudi v
 
Default What are the 94 printable characters from the 128 characters of ASCII table?

No it's not my homework, just curious.
*
I looked at that link before posting.
*
what confused me was the DEL key code. Usually the first 32 characters are control characters but the wiki article clubs DEL with the control characters where as it's assigned the last code in the table. That's after the printable characters.

That's why I posted here to get a confirmation.

On Mon, Jul 25, 2011 at 2:20 PM, Hiisi <hiisi@fedoraproject.org> wrote:




On 25 July 2011 03:26, yudi v <yudi.tux@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> The 94 printable characters from the first 128 characters of the ASCII table

> are the the ones with Hex Codes 0x20 to 0x7E. Is this right?
> --
> Kind regards,
> Yudi
>

Is it your home work?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascii#ASCII_printable_characters

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Hiisi.
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Kind regards,

Yudi


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Old 07-25-2011, 05:41 AM
Gregory Woodbury
 
Default What are the 94 printable characters from the 128 characters of ASCII table?

On Mon, Jul 25, 2011 at 12:52 AM, yudi v <yudi.tux@gmail.com> wrote:

No it's not my homework, just curious.
*
I looked at that link before posting.
*
what confused me was the DEL key code. Usually the first 32 characters are control characters but the wiki article clubs DEL with the control characters where as it's assigned the last code in the table. That's after the printable characters.


That's why I posted here to get a confirmation.

It's history. The DEL code was all holes punched in paper tape (8-level) that was used to RUBOUT a character in error.*
Teletype and papertape systems were programmed to ignore the 0xFF code.* When ASCII was formalized, the code for DEL

was firmly in use as a control character and papertape was still in use.* The various other "control" codes were used for various
esoteric paper tape storage methodologies and later for 8-bit wide magnetic tape systems.


Thanks for the nostalgia trip.

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G.Wolfe Woodbury
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*

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Old 07-25-2011, 02:12 PM
James McKenzie
 
Default What are the 94 printable characters from the 128 characters of ASCII table?

On Sun, Jul 24, 2011 at 9:52 PM, yudi v <yudi.tux@gmail.com> wrote:
> No it's not my homework, just curious.
>
> I looked at that link before posting.
>
> what confused me was the DEL key code. Usually the first 32 characters are
> control characters but the wiki article clubs DEL with the control
> characters where as it's assigned the last code in the table. That's after
> the printable characters.
> That's why I posted here to get a confirmation.

The DEL character is considered a control character and is usually
created through a SHIFT+BACKSPACE.

James
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