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Old 06-04-2011, 11:50 AM
Timothy Murphy
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

Does this matter?
If so, what can you do about it?
I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.

Is it really better to give the block count?

Incidentally, I notice that lshal takes a block as 512B,
while fdisk has 1kB blocks.

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Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

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Old 06-04-2011, 04:02 PM
JD
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On 06/04/11 04:50, Timothy Murphy wrote:

Does this matter?
If so, what can you do about it?
I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.

Is it really better to give the block count?

Incidentally, I notice that lshal takes a block as 512B,
while fdisk has 1kB blocks.



What tool did you use to create
the partition in the first place.

I thought that fdisk, sfdisk and gparted always round up (or
down)

to end of cylinder.




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Old 06-04-2011, 04:54 PM
Tom Horsley
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On Sat, 04 Jun 2011 09:02:48 -0700
JD wrote:

> What tool did you use to create the partition in the first place.
> I thought that fdisk, sfdisk and gparted always round up (or down)
> to end of cylinder.

Over the years, I have used lots of different partitioning
tools, and one thing I have found is that every one of them
"just knows" the rules that ought to be applied to partitions
to put them on the "right" boundaries, and every one of those
tools has different rules and screams and hollers about the
partitioning generated any of the other tools :-).

Every once in a while, I have tried to search for some
definitive statement of what the rules really are, and
I've never found one.
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Old 06-04-2011, 05:00 PM
JD
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On 06/04/11 09:54, Tom Horsley wrote:
> On Sat, 04 Jun 2011 09:02:48 -0700
> JD wrote:
>
>> What tool did you use to create the partition in the first place.
>> I thought that fdisk, sfdisk and gparted always round up (or down)
>> to end of cylinder.
> Over the years, I have used lots of different partitioning
> tools, and one thing I have found is that every one of them
> "just knows" the rules that ought to be applied to partitions
> to put them on the "right" boundaries, and every one of those
> tools has different rules and screams and hollers about the
> partitioning generated any of the other tools :-).
>
> Every once in a while, I have tried to search for some
> definitive statement of what the rules really are, and
> I've never found one.
So my question still stands.
What did you use to create the partition

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Old 06-04-2011, 07:54 PM
John Austin
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On Sat, 2011-06-04 at 10:00 -0700, JD wrote:
> On 06/04/11 09:54, Tom Horsley wrote:
> > On Sat, 04 Jun 2011 09:02:48 -0700
> > JD wrote:
> >
> >> What tool did you use to create the partition in the first place.
> >> I thought that fdisk, sfdisk and gparted always round up (or down)
> >> to end of cylinder.
> > Over the years, I have used lots of different partitioning
> > tools, and one thing I have found is that every one of them
> > "just knows" the rules that ought to be applied to partitions
> > to put them on the "right" boundaries, and every one of those
> > tools has different rules and screams and hollers about the
> > partitioning generated any of the other tools :-).
> >
> > Every once in a while, I have tried to search for some
> > definitive statement of what the rules really are, and
> > I've never found one.
> So my question still stands.
> What did you use to create the partition
>
Hi

I've been using gdisk recently - no hiccups so far

Just installed F15 on an SSD, pre-configuring the disk with
gdisk (F14 version)

Just "normal" partitions (No LVs, ...)

John


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Old 06-04-2011, 11:51 PM
David
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On 4 June 2011 21:50, Timothy Murphy <gayleard@eircom.net> wrote:
[Partition does not end on cylinder boundary]
> Does this matter?
> If so, what can you do about it?
> I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
> choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.

The message refers to an attempt to describe the end sector using an
assumed/fictional number of cylinders, heads, sectors/track. Probably
there are not enough bits in the CHS fields to accomodate a disk of
the size you are using. Linux uses LBA and does not care about CHS.
Some bootloaders require correct CHS values but only to locate the
start, not the end.

"""
There is no known operating system that requires this restriction.
However, there exists software that tries to guess the disk geometry
by looking at the CHS start and end values in a partition table. Note
that with large disks CHS values are entirely meaningless.
"""[1]

"""
In a DOS type partition table the starting offset and the size of each
partition is stored in two ways: as an absolute number of sectors
(given in 32 bits) and as a Cylinders/Heads/Sectors triple (given in
10+8+6 bits). The former is OK - with 512-byte sectors this will work
up to 2 TB. The latter has two different problems. First of all, these
C/H/S fields can be filled only when the number of heads and the
number of sectors per track are known. Secondly, even if we know what
these numbers should be, the 24 bits that are available do not
suffice. DOS uses C/H/S only, Windows uses both, Linux never uses
C/H/S.

If possible, fdisk will obtain the disk geometry automatically. This
is not necessarily the physical disk geometry (indeed, modern disks do
not really have anything like a physical geometry, certainly not
something that can be described in simplistic Cylinders/Heads/Sectors
form), but is the disk geometry that MS-DOS uses for the partition
table.

Usually all goes well by default, and there are no problems if Linux
is the only system on the disk. However, if the disk has to be shared
with other operating systems, it is often a good idea to let an fdisk
from another operating system make at least one partition. When Linux
boots it looks at the partition table, and tries to deduce what (fake)
geometry is required for good cooperation with other systems.
"""[2]

[1] http://www.win.tue.nl/~aeb/partitions/partition_types-2.html
[2] man fdisk
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Old 06-05-2011, 12:19 AM
Aaron Konstam
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On Sat, 2011-06-04 at 12:50 +0100, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> Does this matter?
> If so, what can you do about it?
> I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
> choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.
>
> Is it really better to give the block count?
>
> Incidentally, I notice that lshal takes a block as 512B,
> while fdisk has 1kB blocks.
It would be better if partition ends on a cylinder boundary but the
system will still work.

The block size is determined during the formatting of the partition.

--
================================================== =====================
People who go to conferences are the ones who shouldn't.
================================================== =====================
Aaron Konstam telephone: (210) 656-0355 e-mail: akonstam@sbcglobal.net

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Old 06-05-2011, 12:36 AM
David
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On 5 June 2011 10:19, Aaron Konstam <akonstam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> On Sat, 2011-06-04 at 12:50 +0100, Timothy Murphy wrote:
>> Does this matter?
>> If so, what can you do about it?
>> I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
>> choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.

> It would be better if partition ends on a cylinder boundary but the
> system will still work.

I am curious about *how* specifically that "it would be better".
In what situation is a end "cylinder boundary" important or relevant?
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Old 06-05-2011, 12:55 AM
JD
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On 06/04/11 17:19, Aaron Konstam wrote:
> On Sat, 2011-06-04 at 12:50 +0100, Timothy Murphy wrote:
>> Does this matter?
>> If so, what can you do about it?
>> I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
>> choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.
>>
>> Is it really better to give the block count?
>>
>> Incidentally, I notice that lshal takes a block as 512B,
>> while fdisk has 1kB blocks.
> It would be better if partition ends on a cylinder boundary but the
> system will still work.
>
> The block size is determined during the formatting of the partition.
>
I believe that if the partition does not end on a cylinder boundary,
then the file system will end at the immediately previous cylinder
boundary.


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Old 06-05-2011, 12:59 AM
JD
 
Default Partition does not end on cylinder boundary

On 06/04/11 17:36, David wrote:
> On 5 June 2011 10:19, Aaron Konstam<akonstam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>> On Sat, 2011-06-04 at 12:50 +0100, Timothy Murphy wrote:
>>> Does this matter?
>>> If so, what can you do about it?
>>> I get it after partitioning with fdisk,
>>> choosing partitions of size 50GB, etc.
>> It would be better if partition ends on a cylinder boundary but the
>> system will still work.
> I am curious about *how* specifically that "it would be better".
> In what situation is a end "cylinder boundary" important or relevant?
The filesystem builds it's map of blocks in groups
of cylinders.
You can see this clearly when you create a partition
which will use up the rest of the disk (ie, to end of disk).
often about 8mb always remains unused at end of disk
because it is not a complete cylinder.

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