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Old 08-20-2010, 12:39 AM
Krosh Ivanov
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

Hi guys,
I've installed VMWare and its dependencies ( kernel-headers ). kernel-devel, kernel-pae-devel and others are installed too, but it keeps asking for kernel-headers. What path should I put in "Location" field for VMWare to work?


Thanks

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Old 08-20-2010, 01:50 AM
Chris Kloiber
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

Use the following repo, and get VirtualBox-3.2. Free as in beer. For me,
it works well while VMWare does not support F13 (I could not even run
the installer)


# cat /etc/yum.repos.d/virtualbox.repo
[virtualbox]
name=Fedora $releasever - $basearch - VirtualBox
baseurl=http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/rpm/fedora/$releasever/$basearch
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/debian/oracle_vbox.asc

# yum install VirtualBox-3.2


On 08/19/2010 08:39 PM, Krosh Ivanov wrote:

Hi guys,
I've installed VMWare and its dependencies ( kernel-headers ).
kernel-devel, kernel-pae-devel and others are installed too, but it
keeps asking for kernel-headers. What path should I put in "Location"
field for VMWare to work?

Thanks




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Old 08-20-2010, 02:50 AM
"Robert G. (Doc) Savage"
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

Krosh,

Chris is correct. One of the important library packages (I don't recall
which) changed in F13 and VMware hasn't caught up. You'll be much better
off choosing an alternative like VirtualBox.

--Doc Savage
Fairview Heights, IL

On Thu, 2010-08-19 at 21:50 -0400, Chris Kloiber wrote:
> Use the following repo, and get VirtualBox-3.2. Free as in beer. For me,
> it works well while VMWare does not support F13 (I could not even run
> the installer)
>
> # cat /etc/yum.repos.d/virtualbox.repo
> [virtualbox]
> name=Fedora $releasever - $basearch - VirtualBox
> baseurl=http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/rpm/fedora/$releasever/$basearch
> enabled=1
> gpgcheck=1
> gpgkey=http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/debian/oracle_vbox.asc
>
> # yum install VirtualBox-3.2
>
>
> On 08/19/2010 08:39 PM, Krosh Ivanov wrote:
> > Hi guys,
> > I've installed VMWare and its dependencies ( kernel-headers ).
> > kernel-devel, kernel-pae-devel and others are installed too, but it
> > keeps asking for kernel-headers. What path should I put in "Location"
> > field for VMWare to work?
> >
> > Thanks
> >
>
>

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Old 08-20-2010, 03:40 AM
"Christopher A. Williams"
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

On Thu, 2010-08-19 at 21:50 -0500, Robert G. (Doc) Savage wrote:
> Krosh,
>
> Chris is correct. One of the important library packages (I don't recall
> which) changed in F13 and VMware hasn't caught up. You'll be much better
> off choosing an alternative like VirtualBox.
>

Really...? Which library?

I'm asking because I'm running VMware Workstation 7.1 on F13 with
absolutely zero issues. Runs like a champ and gives me a number of
features that VirtualBox (which I also run from time to time) doesn't.

--

=============================
"You see things as they are and ask, 'Why?'
I dream things as they never were and ask, 'Why not?'"

-- George Bernard Shaw



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Old 08-20-2010, 04:00 AM
"Kevin J. Cummings"
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

On 08/19/2010 11:40 PM, Christopher A. Williams wrote:
> On Thu, 2010-08-19 at 21:50 -0500, Robert G. (Doc) Savage wrote:
>> Krosh,
>>
>> Chris is correct. One of the important library packages (I don't recall
>> which) changed in F13 and VMware hasn't caught up. You'll be much better
>> off choosing an alternative like VirtualBox.
>>
>
> Really...? Which library?
>
> I'm asking because I'm running VMware Workstation 7.1 on F13 with
> absolutely zero issues. Runs like a champ and gives me a number of
> features that VirtualBox (which I also run from time to time) doesn't.

VMWare Server is the one with the most growing pains. It requires 3rd
party patches just to run on F12, so I'm not surprised if it doesn't run
on F13 yet.... It was last released on 10/28/09....

--
Kevin J. Cummings
kjchome@rcn.com
cummings@kjchome.homeip.net
cummings@kjc386.framingham.ma.us
Registered Linux User #1232 (http://counter.li.org)
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Old 08-20-2010, 04:15 AM
"Christopher A. Williams"
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

On Fri, 2010-08-20 at 00:00 -0400, Kevin J. Cummings wrote:
> On 08/19/2010 11:40 PM, Christopher A. Williams wrote:
> > On Thu, 2010-08-19 at 21:50 -0500, Robert G. (Doc) Savage wrote:
> >> Krosh,
> >>
> >> Chris is correct. One of the important library packages (I don't recall
> >> which) changed in F13 and VMware hasn't caught up. You'll be much better
> >> off choosing an alternative like VirtualBox.
> >>
> >
> > Really...? Which library?
> >
> > I'm asking because I'm running VMware Workstation 7.1 on F13 with
> > absolutely zero issues. Runs like a champ and gives me a number of
> > features that VirtualBox (which I also run from time to time) doesn't.
>
> VMWare Server is the one with the most growing pains. It requires 3rd
> party patches just to run on F12, so I'm not surprised if it doesn't run
> on F13 yet.... It was last released on 10/28/09....

Okay... I think I understand now.

I agree, if you are running VMware Server. But I would never run this on
Fedora anymore - or at all for that matter. The product has clearly been
left behind, if not abandoned altogether. If you need a server based,
Type 2 hypervisor, then vBox is a much better free alternative - at
least for now. Who knows what Oracle is going to do here. Based on their
track record, I have a feeling that vBox is not going to be free for all
that much longer, and forking vBox OSE will take some time and dedicated
volunteers.

The only other free alternative with some edge to it is KVM.

Otherwise, you need to just run a Type 1 hypervisor, which leaves you
with VMware ESXi Free edition. It's limited in what it can do compared
to the full version, but it definitely works, and works well.

All that said, if you're willing to actually pay money for a software
product, VMware Workstation 7.1 works perfectly well on F13. And VMware
actually is starting to include official support for Fedora hosts and
guests.

--

=============================
"You see things as they are and ask, 'Why?'
I dream things as they never were and ask, 'Why not?'"

-- George Bernard Shaw



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Old 08-21-2010, 01:24 AM
Chris Kloiber
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

On 08/20/2010 12:15 AM, Christopher A. Williams wrote:


Otherwise, you need to just run a Type 1 hypervisor, which leaves you
with VMware ESXi Free edition. It's limited in what it can do compared
to the full version, but it definitely works, and works well.


I haven't looked into that much, but I understand you need some serious
hardware to make ESXi boot. Much more than the typical desktop, anyway.
Have you gotten this to work on a whitebox (no raid) one random nic???


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Old 08-21-2010, 03:58 AM
"Christopher A. Williams"
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

On Fri, 2010-08-20 at 21:24 -0400, Chris Kloiber wrote:
> On 08/20/2010 12:15 AM, Christopher A. Williams wrote:
>
> > Otherwise, you need to just run a Type 1 hypervisor, which leaves you
> > with VMware ESXi Free edition. It's limited in what it can do compared
> > to the full version, but it definitely works, and works well.
>
> I haven't looked into that much, but I understand you need some serious
> hardware to make ESXi boot. Much more than the typical desktop, anyway.
> Have you gotten this to work on a whitebox (no raid) one random nic???

Yes I have. Compared to an older desktop computer, yes you need a little
more serious hardware. This is not a desktop hypervisor.

Ideally, you want at least 1 good quad-core processor and 4GB of RAM.
Two processors and 8GB will start to give you some real capacity. You
also really want plenty of Gig-E NICs (starting with 4), unless you can
afford 10G Ethernet - a couple of 10G NICs will hold you for a long
time. It then tends to scale up from there, but more so in terms of how
many virtual machines you can run as opposed to how fast they run.

I have a server in my church with 4GB RAM, 2 Gig-E NICs, and a single
Quad-Core CPU. I could realistically run 3 to 4 VMs of average size on
it, but would need more RAM to do anything more than that.

Ironically, on the lower end of the scale, it's possible, if you have
VMware Workstation on a decently powered desktop, to run ESXi in a VM.
Virtualizing Hypervisors is done more for training purposes than
anything else. It's not fast, but it works well enough to give you a
good idea of what a larger system would need.

Cheers,

Chris

--

=============================
"You see things as they are and ask, 'Why?'
I dream things as they never were and ask, 'Why not?'"

-- George Bernard Shaw



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Old 08-21-2010, 05:07 AM
Chris Kloiber
 
Default VMWare and Fedora 13

Really? Last I knew it would not even run unless it found particular
raid adapters, or a fiber san connection. Must look into it again...


On 08/20/2010 11:58 PM, Christopher A. Williams wrote:

On Fri, 2010-08-20 at 21:24 -0400, Chris Kloiber wrote:

On 08/20/2010 12:15 AM, Christopher A. Williams wrote:


Otherwise, you need to just run a Type 1 hypervisor, which leaves you
with VMware ESXi Free edition. It's limited in what it can do compared
to the full version, but it definitely works, and works well.


I haven't looked into that much, but I understand you need some serious
hardware to make ESXi boot. Much more than the typical desktop, anyway.
Have you gotten this to work on a whitebox (no raid) one random nic???


Yes I have. Compared to an older desktop computer, yes you need a little
more serious hardware. This is not a desktop hypervisor.

Ideally, you want at least 1 good quad-core processor and 4GB of RAM.
Two processors and 8GB will start to give you some real capacity. You
also really want plenty of Gig-E NICs (starting with 4), unless you can
afford 10G Ethernet - a couple of 10G NICs will hold you for a long
time. It then tends to scale up from there, but more so in terms of how
many virtual machines you can run as opposed to how fast they run.

I have a server in my church with 4GB RAM, 2 Gig-E NICs, and a single
Quad-Core CPU. I could realistically run 3 to 4 VMs of average size on
it, but would need more RAM to do anything more than that.

Ironically, on the lower end of the scale, it's possible, if you have
VMware Workstation on a decently powered desktop, to run ESXi in a VM.
Virtualizing Hypervisors is done more for training purposes than
anything else. It's not fast, but it works well enough to give you a
good idea of what a larger system would need.

Cheers,

Chris




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