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Old 08-08-2010, 10:10 AM
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

Bob Goodwin <bobgoodwin@wildblue.net> writes:
> This is a current updated f-13 computer connected to our home LAN. I
> have been using a Buffalo Airstation WLI-TX4-AG300N, essentially an
> Ethernet wireless adapter to access the system. I recently bought a
> Netgear WNDR330 dual band "N" wireless router and am having a lot of
> trouble getting it to perform as advertised. This is a less than 20
> year old typical two story frame house. I would expect the walls to
> be essentially transparent to RF energy.

If you have signal problems with the typical low-power 15mW systems, you
can always get something beefier at both ends. You can get nice 300mW
systems and cards from places like Ubiquiti for not much more than
department store router prices. see http://www.ubnt.com/ I have one of
their 300mw PCI cards and a now discontinued 300mW AP card.

-wolfgang
--
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:43 PM
Phil Meyer
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

On 08/07/2010 12:07 PM, Bob Goodwin wrote:
>
> This is a current updated f-13 computer connected to our home LAN. I
> have been using a Buffalo Airstation WLI-TX4-AG300N,
...
> snip
>
...
> Does anyone have experience with a similar system? I would be
> interested to know if my observations are typical or if I have an
> equipment problem. I am considering obtaining a different wireless
> adapter device to replace the Buffalo unit since it is the only
> thing unchanged here.
>


I am now convinced that ethernet over power has reached an adequate
cost/service ratio, and are the best way to go.

Powerline networks are up to 200Mb commonly, and you can get a starter
kit with two or three, depending on brand and model, for about $150.00.

A combination of ethernet over power, and a meshed wireless set up from
open-mesh is the best of both worlds.

Good Luck!
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Old 08-13-2010, 11:09 PM
Bill Davidsen
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

Bob Goodwin wrote:
>
> This is a current updated f-13 computer connected to our home LAN. I
> have been using a Buffalo Airstation WLI-TX4-AG300N, essentially an
> Ethernet wireless adapter to access the system. I recently bought a
> Netgear WNDR330 dual band "N" wireless router and am having a lot of
> trouble getting it to perform as advertised. This is a less than 20
> year old typical two story frame house. I would expect the walls to
> be essentially transparent to RF energy.
>
> Normally the distance between the router and the wireless adapter is
> less than forty feet and there has been no problem operating in the
> 2.4 gHz band however I find that with equipment located as it has
> been for several years the new router will not function at that
> distance in the 5 gHz band. In fact to get any connection at all I
> have to reduce the distance to about ten feet which pretty well
> negates the advantage of a wireless system. I decided several years
> ago that running cables in this house is out of the question.
>

> Does anyone have experience with a similar system? I would be
> interested to know if my observations are typical or if I have an
> equipment problem. I am considering obtaining a different wireless
> adapter device to replace the Buffalo unit since it is the only
> thing unchanged here.
>
> Any suggestions or observations will be appreciated. I feel,like I
> am operating in a vacuum with no one to consult.
>

When Wireless-n was approved I bought a cheap Rosewill AP from Newegg and a USB
dongle, and a PCI USB card so I could learn ad hoc networks. I am in an 1895
three story Victorian house, my computer room is on the 2nd floor. I bought this
equipment because it was cheap and I could return it. Haven't yet.

I work all over the house, on the porch, in the back yard, it's all good. My
usual workplace is a recliner in the library, in front of the TV. Get 100Mb or
so, not bonding, little of what I do needs speed, but dead reliable.

I hope this is similar enough to be useful.

--
Bill Davidsen <davidsen@tmr.com>
"We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from
the machinations of the wicked." - from Slashdot
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Old 08-14-2010, 05:19 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

On 08/07/2010 11:07 AM, Bob Goodwin wrote:
>
> This is a current updated f-13 computer connected to our home LAN. I
> have been using a Buffalo Airstation WLI-TX4-AG300N, essentially an
> Ethernet wireless adapter to access the system. I recently bought a
> Netgear WNDR330 dual band "N" wireless router and am having a lot of
> trouble getting it to perform as advertised. This is a less than 20
> year old typical two story frame house. I would expect the walls to
> be essentially transparent to RF energy.
>
> Normally the distance between the router and the wireless adapter is
> less than forty feet and there has been no problem operating in the
> 2.4 gHz band however I find that with equipment located as it has
> been for several years the new router will not function at that
> distance in the 5 gHz band. In fact to get any connection at all I
> have to reduce the distance to about ten feet which pretty well
> negates the advantage of a wireless system. I decided several years
> ago that running cables in this house is out of the question.
>
> I am on the third WNDR3300 router for other reasons but all of them
> have had weak signal problems in the 5 gHz band. I just got around
> to experimenting with that problem over the last two days.
>
> Does anyone have experience with a similar system? I would be
> interested to know if my observations are typical or if I have an
> equipment problem. I am considering obtaining a different wireless
> adapter device to replace the Buffalo unit since it is the only
> thing unchanged here.
>
> Any suggestions or observations will be appreciated. I feel,like I
> am operating in a vacuum with no one to consult.
>
> Bob
>
Have you thought of a signal booster and antennae?

Note: Antennas can be direct or omnidirectional and
amps can have different wattages. Have a look at
these links:

http://www.teletronics.com/amplifiers.html
http://www.teletronics.com/antennas.html

FWIW,
Dan

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Old 08-18-2010, 09:15 PM
"jdow"
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

From: "g" <geleem@bellsouth.net>
Sent: Saturday, 2010/August/07 17:15


"yes, the higher the frequency, the greater the loss. but there is 'low
loss'
coax for vhf and micro freqs."

"get your head out of cb radio days and rg58 days. "

<snicker> Gene has more experience with RF in his little finger than it
sounds like "g" has.

{^_-} <- An RF engineer who took the time to get to know Gene.

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Old 08-19-2010, 03:06 AM
g
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

On 08/08/2010 01:59 AM, Gene Heskett wrote:
<snip>

[comment brought back to mind by another post]

> At 5Ghz, assuming no wrinkles or bends to cause a reflection,

yes, but in time, a bend, less than recommended, would be more of a center
wire propagation than of reflection concern.

both are a consideration that all who install coax cable should be aware of.


'good night, gracie'.

--

peace out.

tc,hago.

g
.

****
in a free world without fences, who needs gates.
**
help microsoft stamp out piracy - give linux to a friend today.
**
to mess up a linux box, you need to work at it.
to mess up an ms windows box, you just need to *look* at it.
**
learn linux:
'Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition' http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html
'The Linux Documentation Project' http://www.tldp.org/
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Old 08-19-2010, 03:07 AM
g
 
Default F-13 qnw wireless routers -

On 08/18/2010 09:15 PM, jdow wrote:
> From: "g" <geleem@bellsouth.net>
> Sent: Saturday, 2010/August/07 17:15
>
>
> "yes, the higher the frequency, the greater the loss. but there is 'low
> loss' coax for vhf and micro freqs."

this is true. all in design. would not be a lot of coax being sold if
it where not so made. and just think how far 2 way radio communications
would have gotten if coax was not designed for different spreads.

like gene said, more of a selling point.

> "get your head out of cb radio days and rg58 days. "
>
> <snicker> Gene has more experience with RF in his little finger than it
> sounds like "g" has.

you must be young, unlike gene and i.

for as for your "<snicker>", you do not get joke i was making and never
did any cb radioing in early days.

so to bring you to and understanding, in days of old, there were basically
2 50 ohm coaxes used, rg58/u and rg8/u. rg8/u had a lower loss than rg58/u
and many cb'ers would use rg8/u because it has less loss than rg58/u.

because of this, cb'ers started calling rg8/u 'low loss' coax.

as for having more rf knowledge in his little finger, that may be. but my
fingers and my brain have held more than just rf knowledge.

> {^_-} <- An RF engineer who took the time to get to know Gene.

'tis a shame you have limited yourself to just rf. as you sound like you
have spent too much time around transmitter stations. ;^P

so, go ahead with your reply, i am thru with 'off subject'.


--

peace out.

tc,hago.

g
.

****
in a free world without fences, who needs gates.
**
help microsoft stamp out piracy - give linux to a friend today.
**
to mess up a linux box, you need to work at it.
to mess up an ms windows box, you just need to *look* at it.
**
learn linux:
'Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition' http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html
'The Linux Documentation Project' http://www.tldp.org/
'LDP HOWTO-index' http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/HOWTO-INDEX/index.html
'HowtoForge' http://howtoforge.com/
****

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