FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Redhat > Fedora User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 02-25-2010, 02:01 AM
Jorge Fábregas
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

On Wednesday 24 February 2010 22:18:19 Antonio Olivares wrote:
> I have a copy of SystemRescueCD, GpartedLiveCD, in case either of the two
> are handy in this situation. I have run rawhide and have been lucky to
> get back up from those BAD UPDATES once in a while and the test list is
> very generous with their help and guidance.

Hello Antonio,

I've been using partimage for some years now without a single problem thru the
SystemRescueCd. I've used it for ext3 and ntfs as well.

I think Fedora 12 is the last version where I'll use it because partimage
doesn't support ext4 (lucky I was that I chose ext3 for my root filesystem
during F12 installation so I still can use it)...so... if you are already
running F12 and you are using ext4 for your root filesystem forget about
"partimage" and try out "partclone" which may or may not be on the
SystemRescueCD. Here's the website:

http://partclone.org/index.php

On the other hand, Clonezilla is also very popular for creating images. It is
more powerful (lots of options) and it can backup/restore images to & from the
network easily (partimage recently added some network functionality).
Clonezilla is used mainly thru its menu-driven interface, so, for anyone
without much command-line experience it may be less frightening. However, you
still need to know what you are doing! Clonezilla may be overkill for
personal use I think...

Going back to partimage (or partclone which is similar) you basically need to
know well your partitions (where is your root filesystem located etc) so
basically when you boot with one of these LiveCD's the first thing you do is an
"fdisk -l" to list the partitions. Once you identify your root filesystem, the
next thing you need to find out is WHERE do you want to place your backup
image. I usually have one partition on another disk just for this but if you
don't have any other disk you may as well use any partition on your existing
disk (you can throw the image on your /home partition perhaps...). You can
also use any external USB drive to place the image file etc...

The nice thing about these imaging tools is that they're filesystem-aware. That
is, they will only copy the used bits on the filesystem. Let say you have a
10GB root filesystem but you are only using 2GB out of it.... The resulting
image file will be just 2GB. This is just another reason why it's wiser to
have a separate partition for /home.

Imagine you just had a single partition for the / filesystem...and that you had
around 40Gb in docs, music, videos under /home.... Since your personal data
is under the "home" directory within the / filesystem... whenever you perform
an image backup of your root filesystem you'll be backing up ALL your personal
files as well(40GB +) when you only had the intention of backing up your SYSTEM
files in order to revert it back in case of problems with the updates.

So, as you can see, in order to start into this "imaging" thing...it's
essential that you have a separate partition for your personal data and for
your system data. That way, you can use any of these imaging tools to do
backups and restores quickly.. Of course, I'm assuming you already have a
daily backup plan for your /home data (with rsync , cp etc...).

On the specifics (tutorials) you can do a Google search and you'll find plenty.
Feel free to ask here if there's anything specific you don't understand.

All the best,
Jorge
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 
Old 02-25-2010, 02:37 AM
Robert Nichols
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

On 02/24/2010 08:18 PM, Antonio Olivares wrote:
> Dear fellow Fedora users& list members,
>
> On the kmail thread, sarcasm included , I noticed the references to rsync and partimage respectively. Both are recommended to make backups in order to prevent from BAD UPDATES to render your machine/working programs to a halt , and get back up easily. I have not used any of the two and would appreciate some command line examples of how the two work in case I decide to do the same.
>
> I have a copy of SystemRescueCD, GpartedLiveCD, in case either of the two are handy in this situation. I have run rawhide and have been lucky to get back up from those BAD UPDATES once in a while and the test list is very generous with their help and guidance.

partimage is restricted to backing up and restoring entire disk partitions
that appear in /proc/partitions, and that partition cannot be currently
mounted, not even read-only. It cannot restore to anything other than
a partition, which of course must be at least as large as the partition
that was backed up. It is fine for restoring the exact state of a file
system including all metadata, but is not very useful as a general purpose
backup solution.

rsync can be used to maintain a mirror of a file system as long as you
aren't particular about preserving metadata such as access times and
inode numbers. The drawback is that a mirror is for one point in time
only. If you want multiple backup levels you have to have storage for
several complete mirrors.

Personally, I've been using rdiff-backup, which is also included in
SystemRescueCD. It combines an rsync mirror with a series of reverse
diffs that allow you to restore any subset of the backup to any state
that was previously backed up. There's a bit of a learning curve, and
right now SELinux context does not seem to get restored (nothing that
'restorecon' can't fix). The main limitations of rdiff-backup are
(a) a complete inability to merge together old increments, such as
eliminating very old daily increments and leaving just the weekly
backup points, and (b) extreme difficulty in deleting something that
you really hadn't intended to back up, such as that 4GB DVD image
that was temporarily in your home directory. I've managed to handle
item "b" with what is undoubtedly the most incomprehensible 400-line
shell script I've ever written, but I've had no success trying to deal
with "a" other than by brute force working through the entire backup
history re-creating each restore point that I want to save and
creating a new backup from that. Totally impractical!

--
Bob Nichols "NOSPAM" is really part of my email address.
Do NOT delete it.

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 
Old 02-25-2010, 11:27 AM
Tom Horsley
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 21:37:05 -0600
Robert Nichols wrote:

> If you want multiple backup levels you have to have storage for
> several complete mirrors.

Depends on how picky you are about the structure of said backups.
I use the delete option to move the changed files to a deleted
directory rather than removing them, so I wind up with a "latest"
directory, then a slew of directories with names like
"yyyy-mm-dd-hh-mm-ss" that I create to hold the files changed
since yesterday's backups.

Very handy if you want to be able to find individual files.
Not so handy if you want to fully restore from some date
older than latest.
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 
Old 02-25-2010, 12:25 PM
Roberto Ragusa
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

Robert Nichols wrote:
> rsync can be used to maintain a mirror of a file system as long as you
> aren't particular about preserving metadata such as access times and
> inode numbers. The drawback is that a mirror is for one point in time
> only. If you want multiple backup levels you have to have storage for
> several complete mirrors.

Not if you use hard links, for example
rsync --link-dest
or one of the backup tools using this great rsync option.

Real world example: 4 backups per day, more than 1000 "full"
snapshots available in directories named with a timestamp.

--
Roberto Ragusa mail at robertoragusa.it
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 
Old 02-25-2010, 12:42 PM
Patrick O'Callaghan
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

On Thu, 2010-02-25 at 14:25 +0100, Roberto Ragusa wrote:
> Robert Nichols wrote:
> > rsync can be used to maintain a mirror of a file system as long as you
> > aren't particular about preserving metadata such as access times and
> > inode numbers. The drawback is that a mirror is for one point in time
> > only. If you want multiple backup levels you have to have storage for
> > several complete mirrors.
>
> Not if you use hard links, for example
> rsync --link-dest
> or one of the backup tools using this great rsync option.
>
> Real world example: 4 backups per day, more than 1000 "full"
> snapshots available in directories named with a timestamp.

I second that. It's almost as good as Apple's TimeMachine (except that
the latter also hardlinks directories, due to Apple mods in their
filesystem).

I also recommend rsnapshot, (which incorporates this funcionality via
rsync). The only downside I can see is that if your source files have
multiple hard links then the counts in the backup will be off (as each
new backup adds an extra link to any file which hasn't changed; also it
will by default make multiple copies of such source files). This
probably doesn't matter to most people.

poc

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 
Old 02-26-2010, 06:41 AM
Mike Cloaked
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

On Thu, Feb 25, 2010 at 1:26 PM, Roberto Ragusa [via Fedora Users]
<ml-node+415115-878904345-22986@n3.nabble.com> wrote:
> Robert Nichols wrote:
>> rsync can be used to maintain a mirror of a file system as long as you
>> aren't particular about preserving metadata such as access times and
>> inode numbers. *The drawback is that a mirror is for one point in time
>> only. *If you want multiple backup levels you have to have storage for
>> several complete mirrors.
>
> Not if you use hard links, for example
> * rsync --link-dest
> or one of the backup tools using this great rsync option.

rdiff-backup?
--
mike

--
View this message in context: http://n3.nabble.com/rsync-vs-Partimage-vs-other-backup-tp414406p416780.html
Sent from the Fedora Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 
Old 02-27-2010, 05:17 AM
Bruno Wolff III
 
Default rsync, vs Partimage, vs other backup

On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 21:37:05 -0600,
Robert Nichols <rnicholsNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> rsync can be used to maintain a mirror of a file system as long as you
> aren't particular about preserving metadata such as access times and
> inode numbers. The drawback is that a mirror is for one point in time
> only. If you want multiple backup levels you have to have storage for
> several complete mirrors.

Note that this won't work for backing up some things such as database
server data while the database server is running. For those you either
need to use an application specific dump tool or shut the application
down before starting your backup.
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 07:22 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org