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Old 12-15-2007, 09:31 PM
"Paul Smith"
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Dec 15, 2007 10:23 PM, Karl Larsen <k5di@zianet.com> wrote:
> >>>>> I have bought an external hard disk basically for backups. Which
> >>>>> format should I use to format it?
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>> Mine came already formatted as NTFS, but I decided that since I was
> >>>> backing up a linux system, I'd just feel better if I used ext3,
> >>>> so I reformatted it to that for no particular technical reason :-).
> >>>>
> >>>> Note that you can get to NTFS from linux by installing ntfs-3g
> >>>> and ext2/3 from windows by installing Ext2IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/),
> >>>> so either filesystem can work for windows or for linux.
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>> Thanks to both. I have formatted the external disk with ext3, and it
> >>> mounts well. However, when I try to copy something in it, I do not
> >>> have permission for that. How can I overcome this? Where should I
> >>> change the permissions?
> >>>
> >>>
> >> If your backing up the whole of your Linux you need root because
> >> many files are owned by root. So use a root terminal and you will not
> >> have any mor problems.
> >>
> >
> > But I am trying to copy a file not owned by root. Therefore, it should
> > be possible to copy as normal user.
> >
> > Paul
> >
> >
> Tell me more what your seeing. If you use in a terminal the call:
>
> $ cp file /media/xyz
>
> what does the error message say?

$ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
`tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
$

Paul

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:32 PM
"Paul Smith"
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Dec 15, 2007 10:31 PM, Paul Smith <phhs80@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >>>>> I have bought an external hard disk basically for backups. Which
> > >>>>> format should I use to format it?
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> Mine came already formatted as NTFS, but I decided that since I was
> > >>>> backing up a linux system, I'd just feel better if I used ext3,
> > >>>> so I reformatted it to that for no particular technical reason :-).
> > >>>>
> > >>>> Note that you can get to NTFS from linux by installing ntfs-3g
> > >>>> and ext2/3 from windows by installing Ext2IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/),
> > >>>> so either filesystem can work for windows or for linux.
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> Thanks to both. I have formatted the external disk with ext3, and it
> > >>> mounts well. However, when I try to copy something in it, I do not
> > >>> have permission for that. How can I overcome this? Where should I
> > >>> change the permissions?
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >> If your backing up the whole of your Linux you need root because
> > >> many files are owned by root. So use a root terminal and you will not
> > >> have any mor problems.
> > >>
> > >
> > > But I am trying to copy a file not owned by root. Therefore, it should
> > > be possible to copy as normal user.
> > >
> > > Paul
> > >
> > >
> > Tell me more what your seeing. If you use in a terminal the call:
> >
> > $ cp file /media/xyz
> >
> > what does the error message say?
>
> $ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
> `tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
> cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
> $

Furthermore:

$ dir -l tent.pdf
-rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
$

Paul

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:42 PM
"Jonathan Underwood"
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On 15/12/2007, Paul Smith <phhs80@gmail.com> wrote:
> > $ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
> > `tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
> > cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
> > $
>
> Furthermore:
>
> $ dir -l tent.pdf
> -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> $

As root do:
mkdir /media/disk/backup
chown psmith.psmith /media/disk/backup

Now as user psmith, you'll be able to copy what you like to /media/disk/backup.

Basically, just as with any ext3 partitition, you can only write to
directories that the user you're logged into is allowed to.
/media/disk for my external drive when mounted is mounted as:

drwxrwxr-x 5 root users 4096 2007-04-22 22:14 disk

Bsically, just treat it as you would any other ext3 partition.

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:43 PM
Craig White
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Sat, 2007-12-15 at 22:32 +0000, Paul Smith wrote:
> On Dec 15, 2007 10:31 PM, Paul Smith <phhs80@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > >>>>> I have bought an external hard disk basically for backups. Which
> > > >>>>> format should I use to format it?
> > > >>>>>
> > > >>>>>
> > > >>>> Mine came already formatted as NTFS, but I decided that since I was
> > > >>>> backing up a linux system, I'd just feel better if I used ext3,
> > > >>>> so I reformatted it to that for no particular technical reason :-).
> > > >>>>
> > > >>>> Note that you can get to NTFS from linux by installing ntfs-3g
> > > >>>> and ext2/3 from windows by installing Ext2IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/),
> > > >>>> so either filesystem can work for windows or for linux.
> > > >>>>
> > > >>>>
> > > >>> Thanks to both. I have formatted the external disk with ext3, and it
> > > >>> mounts well. However, when I try to copy something in it, I do not
> > > >>> have permission for that. How can I overcome this? Where should I
> > > >>> change the permissions?
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >> If your backing up the whole of your Linux you need root because
> > > >> many files are owned by root. So use a root terminal and you will not
> > > >> have any mor problems.
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > > But I am trying to copy a file not owned by root. Therefore, it should
> > > > be possible to copy as normal user.
> > > >
> > > > Paul
> > > >
> > > >
> > > Tell me more what your seeing. If you use in a terminal the call:
> > >
> > > $ cp file /media/xyz
> > >
> > > what does the error message say?
> >
> > $ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
> > `tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
> > cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
> > $
>
> Furthermore:
>
> $ dir -l tent.pdf
> -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> $
----
mkdir /media/disk/psmith_data
chown psmithsmith /media/disk/psmith_data -R # changes ownership
chmod g+w,g+s /media/disk/psmith_data -R # makes writable and sticky
group

Craig

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:43 PM
Brian Mury
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

> > $ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
> > `tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
> > cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
> > $
>
> Furthermore:
>
> $ dir -l tent.pdf
> -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> $

Make sure you have write permissions for the directory you are copying
the file to (in this case, /media/disk).


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Old 12-15-2007, 09:52 PM
Karl Larsen
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

Paul Smith wrote:

On Dec 15, 2007 10:23 PM, Karl Larsen <k5di@zianet.com> wrote:


I have bought an external hard disk basically for backups. Which
format should I use to format it?




Mine came already formatted as NTFS, but I decided that since I was
backing up a linux system, I'd just feel better if I used ext3,
so I reformatted it to that for no particular technical reason :-).

Note that you can get to NTFS from linux by installing ntfs-3g
and ext2/3 from windows by installing Ext2IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/),
so either filesystem can work for windows or for linux.




Thanks to both. I have formatted the external disk with ext3, and it
mounts well. However, when I try to copy something in it, I do not
have permission for that. How can I overcome this? Where should I
change the permissions?




If your backing up the whole of your Linux you need root because
many files are owned by root. So use a root terminal and you will not
have any mor problems.



But I am trying to copy a file not owned by root. Therefore, it should
be possible to copy as normal user.

Paul




Tell me more what your seeing. If you use in a terminal the call:

$ cp file /media/xyz

what does the error message say?



$ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
`tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
$

Paul


OK. Well then you must either use a root terminal or from a root
terminal you can use


# cd /media/disk
# chown your login

Karl




--

Karl F. Larsen, AKA K5DI
Linux User
#450462 http://counter.li.org.
GPG DF28 8F18 94F8 D5C6 9E44 163F 7FD1 3D06 C325 DA40

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:52 PM
Aaron Konstam
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Sat, 2007-12-15 at 22:32 +0000, Paul Smith wrote:
> On Dec 15, 2007 10:31 PM, Paul Smith <phhs80@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > >>>>> I have bought an external hard disk basically for backups. Which
> > > >>>>> format should I use to format it?
> > > >>>>>
> > > >>>>>
> > > >>>> Mine came already formatted as NTFS, but I decided that since I was
> > > >>>> backing up a linux system, I'd just feel better if I used ext3,
> > > >>>> so I reformatted it to that for no particular technical reason :-).
> > > >>>>
> > > >>>> Note that you can get to NTFS from linux by installing ntfs-3g
> > > >>>> and ext2/3 from windows by installing Ext2IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/),
> > > >>>> so either filesystem can work for windows or for linux.
> > > >>>>
> > > >>>>
> > > >>> Thanks to both. I have formatted the external disk with ext3, and it
> > > >>> mounts well. However, when I try to copy something in it, I do not
> > > >>> have permission for that. How can I overcome this? Where should I
> > > >>> change the permissions?
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >> If your backing up the whole of your Linux you need root because
> > > >> many files are owned by root. So use a root terminal and you will not
> > > >> have any mor problems.
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > > But I am trying to copy a file not owned by root. Therefore, it should
> > > > be possible to copy as normal user.
> > > >
> > > > Paul
> > > >
> > > >
> > > Tell me more what your seeing. If you use in a terminal the call:
> > >
> > > $ cp file /media/xyz
> > >
> > > what does the error message say?
> >
> > $ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
> > `tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
> > cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
> > $
>
> Furthermore:
> $ dir -l tent.pdf
> -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> $ke
This is the first time I have seen someone use dir rather than ls in a
*nix environment. This is not a criticism just a indication of surprise.

Anyway , it is clear that the permissions will not allow the file to be
written by anyone but psmith. So as psmith your copy would work. I
suspect the permissions of /media/disk are too restrictive also.
--
================================================== =====================
core error - bus dumped
================================================== =====================
Aaron Konstam telephone: (210) 656-0355 e-mail: akonstam@sbcglobal.net

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:53 PM
"Paul Smith"
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Dec 15, 2007 10:43 PM, Craig White <craigwhite@azapple.com> wrote:
> > > > >>>>> I have bought an external hard disk basically for backups. Which
> > > > >>>>> format should I use to format it?
> > > > >>>>>
> > > > >>>>>
> > > > >>>> Mine came already formatted as NTFS, but I decided that since I was
> > > > >>>> backing up a linux system, I'd just feel better if I used ext3,
> > > > >>>> so I reformatted it to that for no particular technical reason :-).
> > > > >>>>
> > > > >>>> Note that you can get to NTFS from linux by installing ntfs-3g
> > > > >>>> and ext2/3 from windows by installing Ext2IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/),
> > > > >>>> so either filesystem can work for windows or for linux.
> > > > >>>>
> > > > >>>>
> > > > >>> Thanks to both. I have formatted the external disk with ext3, and it
> > > > >>> mounts well. However, when I try to copy something in it, I do not
> > > > >>> have permission for that. How can I overcome this? Where should I
> > > > >>> change the permissions?
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>>
> > > > >> If your backing up the whole of your Linux you need root because
> > > > >> many files are owned by root. So use a root terminal and you will not
> > > > >> have any mor problems.
> > > > >>
> > > > >
> > > > > But I am trying to copy a file not owned by root. Therefore, it should
> > > > > be possible to copy as normal user.
> > > > >
> > > > > Paul
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > Tell me more what your seeing. If you use in a terminal the call:
> > > >
> > > > $ cp file /media/xyz
> > > >
> > > > what does the error message say?
> > >
> > > $ cp -v tent.pdf /media/disk/
> > > `tent.pdf' -> `/media/disk/tent.pdf'
> > > cp: cannot create regular file `/media/disk/tent.pdf': Permission denied
> > > $
> >
> > Furthermore:
> >
> > $ dir -l tent.pdf
> > -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> > $
> ----
> mkdir /media/disk/psmith_data
> chown psmithsmith /media/disk/psmith_data -R # changes ownership
> chmod g+w,g+s /media/disk/psmith_data -R # makes writable and sticky
> group

Thanks to all! It works now with Craig method.

Paul

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Old 12-15-2007, 10:14 PM
"Paul Smith"
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Dec 15, 2007 10:52 PM, Aaron Konstam <akonstam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> > Furthermore:
> > $ dir -l tent.pdf
> > -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> > $ke
> This is the first time I have seen someone use dir rather than ls in a
> *nix environment. This is not a criticism just a indication of surprise.

I am, Aaron, a former user of MS Windows. That is why I tend to use
'dir' instead of 'ls'. However, my conversion to Linux has already
several years, and I am very satisfied with Linux, particularly with
Fedora.

Paul

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Old 12-15-2007, 10:18 PM
Craig White
 
Default Which format should I use to format external disk?

On Sat, 2007-12-15 at 16:52 -0600, Aaron Konstam wrote:
> On Sat, 2007-12-15 at 22:32 +0000, Paul Smith wrote:

> > $ dir -l tent.pdf
> > -rw-r----- 1 psmith psmith 95075 2006-12-31 21:25 tent.pdf
> > $ke
> This is the first time I have seen someone use dir rather than ls in a
> *nix environment. This is not a criticism just a indication of surprise.
----
dir of course works on linux but ls doesn't work on Windows unless
you've got SFU or cygwin installed

sometimes I just forget which I'm using but in case of OP, I suspect
that the windows commands are more familiar

Craig

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