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Old 08-19-2008, 04:49 PM
William Case
 
Default Removing and re-installing gconf & gconf-editor ??

Hi;

I just freshly re-installed Fedora 9.

Problem:

Many of my gnome applets and desktop are still not working as they
should.

gconf & gconf-editor is not giving me the same keys in 'root' as in
'user' for common applications because (I think) gconf in 'user' is
being over ridden by the '/home/user/.gconf' in the /home partition that
I preserved on the new install. I used the 'root account ' as a
comparison because its .gconf was removed and re-written by gconf on
installation.

gconf-cleaner in 'user' finds more and more keys to change or remove
each time I run it in whichever 'user account ' ( I have three on my
machine.)

The problems that I have and that have persisted with the re-install
are:

* Information for system => networking => is missing from
my .gconf and gconf-editor. I have been told by several people
on this list that that data should be present although I don't
remember having seen it before.
* The latest linux kernel update was installed but was not being
updated in grub.conf.
* 'clock' applet not getting task and calendar info from Evolution
properly. The clock applet has different keys in root from
user. The biggest difference being the inclusion
of /apps/panel/default_setup/applets/clock/bonobo_iid and the
absence of the choices for task list and appointments. Every
time I click on it disappears from the panel and warns me to
reload. (I include that as a symptom of bigger things)
* My trashcan has disappeared from my desktop and nautilus through
gconf-editor won't/can't put it back. I have had several people
post me about how it is supposed to work. I assure everyone I
have marked it as visible in nautilus => desktop. That works
when I am logged in as root but not as a user.
* Plus other screwy things are going on with other applications
that may or may not be related. I haven't chased them down yet,
and it may not be necessary if I can get my gconf working.

I have checked the logs and roots messages nothing _seems_ untoward on
the surface of it (some unalarming gnome-keyring messages and gconfd
resolving some addresses).

Unless someone has a better solution, I was thinking of 'yum remove
gconf gconf-editor' and deleting all my user's .gconf dir/files. Then
re-installing gconf and gconf-editor.

However, that means I lose all my configurations for all my apps; and,
gconf-editor has a lot of dependencies. If yum had a way to remove an
app while leaving the dependencies intact or a way to do a 'dry run' I
wouldn't be asking for advice. I have read through man yum-utils etc and
see nothing useful there. I am not sure rpm -evv --nodeps -- test would
be any better.

************************************************** ***************

If anyone has a better idea of where the problems might lie or how to
fix them please let me know.

************************************************** ***************

The thing that bothers me about my solution is that gconf should have
installed in the first place accommodating my preexisting ~/.gconf. As
far as I can tell, I have not touched or been messing about with
anything that should damage gconf.

--
Regards Bill;
Fedora 9, Gnome 2.22.3
Evo.2.22.3.1, Emacs 22.2.1

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Old 08-19-2008, 05:32 PM
Frank Cox
 
Default Removing and re-installing gconf & gconf-editor ??

On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 12:49:33 -0400
William Case <billlinux@rogers.com> wrote:

> If yum had a way to remove an
> app while leaving the dependencies intact

rpm -e --nodeps packagename

> or a way to do a 'dry run' I
> wouldn't be asking for advice.

"yum whatever" does its checking and then prints a list of what it's going to
do. It then asks you if it should proceed. If you say "N" then you have just
done a 'dry run'.

--
MELVILLE THEATRE ~ Melville Sask ~ http://www.melvilletheatre.com

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Old 08-19-2008, 05:37 PM
"Patrick O'Callaghan"
 
Default Removing and re-installing gconf & gconf-editor ??

On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 12:49 -0400, William Case wrote:
> Hi;
>
> I just freshly re-installed Fedora 9.
>
> Problem:
>
> Many of my gnome applets and desktop are still not working as they
> should.
>
> gconf & gconf-editor is not giving me the same keys in 'root' as in
> 'user' for common applications because (I think) gconf in 'user' is
> being over ridden by the '/home/user/.gconf' in the /home partition that
> I preserved on the new install.

Naturally. That's exactly what you would expect. The root and user Gconf
data are entirely independant of each other (because they are two
different users).

> I used the 'root account ' as a
> comparison because its .gconf was removed and re-written by gconf on
> installation.
>
> gconf-cleaner in 'user' finds more and more keys to change or remove
> each time I run it in whichever 'user account ' ( I have three on my
> machine.)
[...]
> Unless someone has a better solution, I was thinking of 'yum remove
> gconf gconf-editor' and deleting all my user's .gconf dir/files. Then
> re-installing gconf and gconf-editor.

Deleting ~/.gconf (and ~/.gconf2) may fix your problems, although
instead of deleting them I'd move them to one side just in case.

Removing and reinstalling gconf and gconf-editor is completely pointless
and will undoubtedly cause a cascade of dependant package removals.

> However, that means I lose all my configurations for all my apps; and,
> gconf-editor has a lot of dependencies. If yum had a way to remove an
> app while leaving the dependencies intact or a way to do a 'dry run' I
> wouldn't be asking for advice.

It automatically does a dry run, since it asks you to confirm before
proceeding.

> I have read through man yum-utils etc and
> see nothing useful there. I am not sure rpm -evv --nodeps -- test would
> be any better.

Almost guaranteed to cause problems. Using --nodeps is an action of last
resort, when there's something seriously wrong with a package
installation or a spec file. Given that you have just reinstalled your
entire system, there's no reason to suspect anything is wrong with your
package set or any of its components.

> ************************************************** ***************
>
> If anyone has a better idea of where the problems might lie or how to
> fix them please let me know.
>
> ************************************************** ***************
>
> The thing that bothers me about my solution is that gconf should have
> installed in the first place accommodating my preexisting ~/.gconf. As
> far as I can tell, I have not touched or been messing about with
> anything that should damage gconf.

You've been doing a lot of tweaking in your system, and some of it may
well have touched Gconf data. That's what you need to clean up, not
Gconf itself. Given the large number of problems, you're better off just
nuking it and reconfiguring what you need. Keep a backup in case you
need to consult something while doing the setup.

poc

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Old 08-19-2008, 06:24 PM
William Case
 
Default Removing and re-installing gconf & gconf-editor ??

On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 13:07 -0430, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 12:49 -0400, William Case wrote:
> > Hi;
> >
> > I just freshly re-installed Fedora 9.
> >
> > Problem:
> >
> > Many of my gnome applets and desktop are still not working as they
> > should.
> >
> > gconf & gconf-editor is not giving me the same keys in 'root' as in
> > 'user' for common applications because (I think) gconf in 'user' is
> > being over ridden by the '/home/user/.gconf' in the /home partition that
> > I preserved on the new install.
>
> Naturally. That's exactly what you would expect. The root and user Gconf
> data are entirely independant of each other (because they are two
> different users).
>
I understand they are independent from each other, that is why I
compared them. The setup I had for an ordinary user was not very
different from the root user. For example, things like the tasklist and
calander keys in the gconf of the 'clock' applet should have been the
same (marked true, yet they were now completely absent from
gconf-editor).

> > I used the 'root account ' as a
> > comparison because its .gconf was removed and re-written by gconf on
> > installation.
> >
> > gconf-cleaner in 'user' finds more and more keys to change or remove
> > each time I run it in whichever 'user account ' ( I have three on my
> > machine.)
> [...]
> > Unless someone has a better solution, I was thinking of 'yum remove
> > gconf gconf-editor' and deleting all my user's .gconf dir/files. Then
> > re-installing gconf and gconf-editor.
>
> Deleting ~/.gconf (and ~/.gconf2) may fix your problems, although
> instead of deleting them I'd move them to one side just in case.
>
Of course, you're right.

> Removing and reinstalling gconf and gconf-editor is completely pointless
> and will undoubtedly cause a cascade of dependant package removals.
>

That was what I was afraid of. A case of frustration overriding
judgement.

> > However, that means I lose all my configurations for all my apps; and,
> > gconf-editor has a lot of dependencies. If yum had a way to remove an
> > app while leaving the dependencies intact or a way to do a 'dry run' I
> > wouldn't be asking for advice.
>
> It automatically does a dry run, since it asks you to confirm before
> proceeding.
>

A case of frustration overriding common sense.

> > I have read through man yum-utils etc and
> > see nothing useful there. I am not sure rpm -evv --nodeps -- test would
> > be any better.
>
> Almost guaranteed to cause problems. Using --nodeps is an action of last
> resort, when there's something seriously wrong with a package
> installation or a spec file. Given that you have just reinstalled your
> entire system, there's no reason to suspect anything is wrong with your
> package set or any of its components.
>
Forewarned is to be forearmed. When I move -/.gconf and -/.gconf2
aside, I trust that gconf will write new files. ( No answer necessary;
I'll find out soon enough.)

> > ************************************************** ***************
> >
> > If anyone has a better idea of where the problems might lie or how to
> > fix them please let me know.
> >
> > ************************************************** ***************
> >
> > The thing that bothers me about my solution is that gconf should have
> > installed in the first place accommodating my preexisting ~/.gconf. As
> > far as I can tell, I have not touched or been messing about with
> > anything that should damage gconf.
>
> You've been doing a lot of tweaking in your system, and some of it may
> well have touched Gconf data.

Calling it 'tweaking' is very kind, Patrick.

> That's what you need to clean up, not
> Gconf itself. Given the large number of problems, you're better off just
> nuking it and reconfiguring what you need. Keep a backup in case you
> need to consult something while doing the setup.
>
> poc
>
--
Regards Bill;
Fedora 9, Gnome 2.22.3
Evo.2.22.3.1, Emacs 22.2.1

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Old 08-19-2008, 07:05 PM
"Patrick O'Callaghan"
 
Default Removing and re-installing gconf & gconf-editor ??

On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 14:24 -0400, William Case wrote:
> On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 13:07 -0430, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
[...]

> > Almost guaranteed to cause problems. Using --nodeps is an action of last
> > resort, when there's something seriously wrong with a package
> > installation or a spec file. Given that you have just reinstalled your
> > entire system, there's no reason to suspect anything is wrong with your
> > package set or any of its components.
> >
> Forewarned is to be forearmed. When I move -/.gconf and -/.gconf2
> aside, I trust that gconf will write new files. ( No answer necessary;
> I'll find out soon enough.)

Do it when logged out of the account. I'm not sure of the effect if you
try it while the gconf daemon is using the data, but it might not be
good.
[...]

> >
> > You've been doing a lot of tweaking in your system, and some of it may
> > well have touched Gconf data.
>
> Calling it 'tweaking' is very kind, Patrick.

Well, there are other terms :-) See
http://www.jargondb.org/glossary/frobnicate for a list.

poc

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