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Old 08-04-2008, 06:35 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Anne Wilson wrote:


On Monday 04 August 2008 18:27:56 Daniel B. Thurman wrote:
>
> Never mind! I got myself out of the problem!
>
How? Someone will see this in the archives and will want to know the
answer :-)

Anne


ok, fair enough!

I followed Tim's instructions, but did this with Fedora-Live CD:

1) Boot in Fedora-Live
+ Open Shell Terminal Window

2) fdisk -l

*** note!!! ***
+ Disk drives are DIFFERENT, not necessarily the same as when booted
in Fedora!


For example, when you boot in Fedora (the real thing), the 3
disks for

me it was:
/dev/sda - PATA
/dev/sdb - SATA-1
/dev/sdc - SATA-2

In Fedora-Live, is displayed as:
/dev/sdb (PATA)
/dev/sdc (SATA-2)
/dev/sdd (SATA-1)

3) grub

a) find /grub/stage1
In my case, it showed:
(hd1,0) - SATA-2 - boot-sys - the next 2 partitions are the NEW
drive I am trying to construct per Tim's instructions

(hd1,1) - SATA-2 - boot-f8
(hd1,2) - SATA-2 - boot-f9
(hd2,2) - SATA-1 - boot-f8 - this is my original "untouched"
drive where I started originally. This was the grub I "popped"


b) setup (hd2)
(grub has installed the MBR and fixed my original drive problem
- output was similar to Tim's instructions)


c) quit
d) Reboot - I was able to get my original drive back up and running!)

The new drive I am still working on is:

SATA-2 (750GB)
======================
*** Note *** Actual sizes are not exact!
/dev/sdc1 - boot-sys (100MB)
/dev/sdc2 - f8-boot (100MB)
/dev/sdc3 - f9-boot (100MB)
/dev/sdc4 - Extended Partition
/dev/sdc5 - f8-root (175GB)
/dev/sdc6 - f9-root (175GB)
/dev/sdc7 - f-App1 (351GB)
/dev/sdc8 - swap (~5GB) (I have 2GB RAM)

To be continued....

Cheers!
Dan

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Old 08-04-2008, 11:25 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Tim wrote:


On Sun, 2008-08-03 at 15:56 -0700, Daniel B. Thurman wrote:
> What is the command for installing the "MBR" and grub into each
> of their respective partitions?
>
> I tried: grub-install --recheck /dev/sdc1, and likewise for /dev/sdc2
> and /dev/sdc3 but nothing happens.

I've never bothered with grub-install, other than the one time it didn't
do what it was supposed to. After that I decided not to bother with it
again. I issue the real commands directly:

The grub command to enter a GRUB shell.
The root command to tell GRUB where /boot will be (and GRUB's root is
held).
The find command to check that GRUB can find the files it needs.
The setup command to setup which drive MBR to write to, or which

partition.
And the quit command to write all the changes and exit.


Pasting of a session is below, the GRUB input prompts are beside
"grub>", the rest is output.

[root@localhost ~]# grub
Probing devices to guess BIOS drives. This may take a long time.


GNU GRUB version 0.97 (640K lower / 3072K upper memory)

[ Minimal BASH-like line editing is supported. For the first word, TAB
lists possible command completions. Anywhere else TAB lists the
possible
completions of a device/filename.]
grub> root (hd0,0)
root (hd0,0)
Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83
grub> find /grub/stage1
find /grub/stage1
(hd0,0)
grub> setup (hd0)
setup (hd0)
Checking if "/boot/grub/stage1" exists... no
Checking if "/grub/stage1" exists... yes
Checking if "/grub/stage2" exists... yes
Checking if "/grub/e2fs_stage1_5" exists... yes
Running "embed /grub/e2fs_stage1_5 (hd0)"... 23 sectors are embedded.
succeeded
Running "install /grub/stage1 (hd0) (hd0)1+23 p
(hd0,0)/grub/stage2 /grub/grub.conf"... succeeded
Done.
grub> quit
quit
[root@localhost ~]#

My set of examples picks my first boot partition (the root command), and
writes back to the disc's MBR (the setup command). You'd change the
root and setup parameters to suit each installation, to install GRUB
"stage ones" into each boot partition. In your case, you'd pick the
same drive and partition for the root and setup commands.

By the way, grub-install is just a script. You can read it and see how
it works, if you really want to.

> Since I had copies of /boot for f8 and f9 I simply copied f8's boot
> files into /dev/sdc2 and f9's boot files into /dev/sdc3 but
> for /dev/sdc1 (boot-sys), I copied f8's boot files into /dev/sdc1,
> removed initd*, vm*, and System*, edited grub/grub.conf with the
> chain-loaders like you said.

Hmm, I don't know exactly what you mean by "boot files". Each /boot
partition would have that OS's kernel files, and a grub sub-directory
for that installation's GRUB files (menus, stage loaders, etc.). There
shouldn't be any need to copy things about.

Inside /boot/grub:

-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 63 2008-06-01 01:39 device.map
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 11768 2008-06-01 01:39 e2fs_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 11528 2008-06-01 01:39 fat_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 10776 2008-06-01 01:39 ffs_stage1_5
-rw------- 1 root root 1700 2008-07-27 16:47 grub.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 10768 2008-06-01 01:39 iso9660_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 12440 2008-06-01 01:39 jfs_stage1_5
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 11 2008-06-01 01:39 menu.lst -> ./grub.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 10984 2008-06-01 01:39 minix_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 83780 2008-06-30 12:22 mixer-cropped.xpm.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 85014 2008-06-30 12:22 mixer.xpm.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 13376 2008-06-01 01:39 reiserfs_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 66003 2008-04-12 05:32 splash.xpm.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 512 2008-06-01 01:39 stage1
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 110532 2008-06-01 01:39 stage2
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 11040 2008-06-01 01:39 ufs2_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 10376 2008-06-01 01:39 vstafs_stage1_5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 13016 2008-06-01 01:39 xfs_stage1_5

> But I am at loss to figure out how to get each of the 3 partitions
> with it's own "MBR".

Terminology problem... MBR is Master Boot Record, there's only one of
them per disc. Initial stages of GRUB can be put in the disc MBR, or at
the beginning of individual partitions (not a MBR, but something
similar, and a mental blank strikes me as to its proper name).


Here is my drive partitions:
========================
/dev/sdb - Sata - 750GB drive
[Sizes specified are not exact]

/dev/sdb1 - boot-sys (100MB)
/dev/sdb2 - boot-f8 (100MB)
/dev/sdb3 - boot-f9 (100MB)
/dev/sdb4 - Extended
/dev/sdb5 - root-f8 (175GB)
/dev/sdb6 - root-f9 (175GB)
/dev/sdb7 - f-App1 (351GB)
/dev/sdb8 - swap (~5GB)

Ok, I have thus far, set up a new drive with the partitions, finally
figured out how to get the new drive's MBR installed and to use
the boot-sys (/dev/sdb1) file, but apparently, the chain-loaders could
not boot the root-f8 (/dev/sdb5) nor root-f9 (/dev/sdb6) filesystem. Do
I need to make the [boot-f8 (/dev/sdb2) and boot-f9 (/dev/sdb3) ] and/or
[ root-f8 (/dev/sdb5) and root-f9 (/dev/sdb6) ] filesystems bootable?

If so, what command do I need to use to make these partitions bootable?

Thanks!
Dan

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Old 08-05-2008, 05:06 AM
Tim
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

On Mon, 2008-08-04 at 16:25 -0700, Daniel B. Thurman wrote:
> Here is my drive partitions:
> ========================
> /dev/sdb - Sata - 750GB drive
> [Sizes specified are not exact]
>
> /dev/sdb1 - boot-sys (100MB)
> /dev/sdb2 - boot-f8 (100MB)
> /dev/sdb3 - boot-f9 (100MB)
> /dev/sdb4 - Extended
> /dev/sdb5 - root-f8 (175GB)
> /dev/sdb6 - root-f9 (175GB)
> /dev/sdb7 - f-App1 (351GB)
> /dev/sdb8 - swap (~5GB)
>
> Ok, I have thus far, set up a new drive with the partitions, finally
> figured out how to get the new drive's MBR installed and to use
> the boot-sys (/dev/sdb1) file, but apparently, the chain-loaders
> could not boot the root-f8 (/dev/sdb5) nor root-f9 (/dev/sdb6)
> filesystem.

You chainload into the *boot* partition, each boot partition refers to
its *root* partition on the kernel load lines.

> Do I need to make the [boot-f8 (/dev/sdb2) and boot-f9 (/dev/sdb3) ]
> and/or [ root-f8 (/dev/sdb5) and root-f9 (/dev/sdb6) ] filesystems
> bootable?

You shouldn't need to do that. It's really only the BIOS that goes
looking for bootable partitions, to pick which to boot up by default.

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r
2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686

Don't send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored. I
read messages from the public lists.



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Old 08-05-2008, 03:28 PM
Dan Thurman
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Daniel B. Thurman wrote:


Anne Wilson wrote:
>
> On Monday 04 August 2008 18:27:56 Daniel B. Thurman wrote:
> >
> > Never mind! I got myself out of the problem!
> >
> How? Someone will see this in the archives and will want to know the
> answer :-)
>
> Anne
>
ok, fair enough!

I followed Tim's instructions, but did this with Fedora-Live CD:

1) Boot in Fedora-Live
+ Open Shell Terminal Window

2) fdisk -l

*** note!!! ***
+ Disk drives are DIFFERENT, not necessarily the same as when booted
in Fedora!

For example, when you boot in Fedora (the real thing), the 3
disks for
me it was:
/dev/sda - PATA
/dev/sdb - SATA-1
/dev/sdc - SATA-2

In Fedora-Live, is displayed as:
/dev/sdb (PATA)
/dev/sdc (SATA-2)
/dev/sdd (SATA-1)

3) grub

a) find /grub/stage1
In my case, it showed:
(hd1,0) - SATA-2 - boot-sys - the next 2 partitions are the NEW
drive I am trying to construct per Tim's instructions
(hd1,1) - SATA-2 - boot-f8
(hd1,2) - SATA-2 - boot-f9
(hd2,2) - SATA-1 - boot-f8 - this is my original "untouched"
drive where I started originally. This was the grub I "popped"

b) setup (hd2)
(grub has installed the MBR and fixed my original drive problem
- output was similar to Tim's instructions)

c) quit
d) Reboot - I was able to get my original drive back up and running!)

The new drive I am still working on is:

SATA-2 (750GB)
======================
*** Note *** Actual sizes are not exact!
/dev/sdc1 - boot-sys (100MB)
/dev/sdc2 - f8-boot (100MB)
/dev/sdc3 - f9-boot (100MB)
/dev/sdc4 - Extended Partition
/dev/sdc5 - f8-root (175GB)
/dev/sdc6 - f9-root (175GB)
/dev/sdc7 - f-App1 (351GB)
/dev/sdc8 - swap (~5GB) (I have 2GB RAM)


I have found in 3b, above: "setup (hd2)", it is the same as if
you used "setup (hd2.0)". I have found that once you have the
partitions for 3 boot directories, boot-sys, boot-f8, and boot-f9,
you can either copy over the existing f8 and/or f9 boot partitions
into the new respective locations (as I did), and as for the boot-sys
partition, I simply copied over my f8 boot partition, and stripped
everything above grub directory.

While you are at it, you can also copy over your root-f8 and root-f9
files into the root-f8 and root-f9 partitions as well. How you get
these copied over successfully has mixed results (cp -a, tar, GParted),
but if you rather use a true clone program, try CloneZilla

As a tool for tracking/verification, in each of the 3 partitions,
I created bread-crumbs as empty files: BOOT-SYS, BOOT-F8, BOOT-F9 in
each of the respective directories so that I can ensure that these
directories are easily identifiable and not mistaken for something else
along the way.

At this point, I have also found that I needed to run grub setup on each
of these 3 boot partitions; similar to above instructions:

Boot up the system, if you cannot get into a grub-display at boot-time,
you may need to boot in Fedora-Live or Rescue CD. If you can get a
grub splash-screen at bootup (w/o CDs), the simply hit 'c' for command.

# grub
grub> find /grub/stage1 (note where your 3 partitions are)
(hd0.0) <-- boot-sys (/dev/sdb1)
(hd0,1) <-- boot-f8 (/dev/sdb2)
(hd0,2) <-- boot-f9 (/dev/sdb3)
(hd1,2)

NOTE! Grub saw things differently again. I am assuming that the appearance
of this new order, may have to do with the device.maps that I had before
from
the original f8 installation, and for whatever the reasons, it pays to
make SURE

you are "in sync" with what grub actually reports.

Remember about leaving breadcrumbs earlier? If you are not sure which
drive is which, you can try searching in this way:

grub> find BOOT-SYS
(hd0.0)
grub> find BOOT-F8
(hd0.1)
grub> find BOOT-F9
(hd0.2)

Note: Now we can go ahead to create grub-bootable partitions
for each of the 3 partitions we created earlier:

grub> root (hd0,0)
grub> setup (hd0,0)
<results are shown here>

grub> root (hd0,1)
grub> setup (hd0,1)
<results are shown here>

grub> root (hd0,2)
grub> setup (hd0,2)
<results are shown here>

grub> quit


Now it is time to edit the grub.conf files for each of the 3 partitions.

=========[boot.sys]============
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda5
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
#hiddenmenu
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
default=saved
timeout=5

title Fedora 8 SDB1
rootnoverify (hd0,1)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Fedora 9
rootnoverify (hd0,2)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows 2000
rootnoverify (hd1,0)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows XP
rootnoverify (hd1,1)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows Vista
rootnoverify (hd1,2)
chainloader +1
savedefault

Note: You see the "SDB1" tag? I wanted to make sure
that I am actually using the correct boot partition and not
from some other boot partition from somewhere else. I
ran into this trap before - and the reasons has to do with
the way grub finds files (in a different order), mis-configured
boot-grub files, and/or /etc/fstab files and it becomes much
easier to track and identify things by leaving bread-crumbs
to aide in debugging, IMO.

=========[boot.f8]============
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes
# to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda5
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
#hiddenmenu
splashimage=(hd0,1)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
default=saved
timeout=5

title Fedora 8 (2.6.25.11-60.fc8) SDB2
root (hd0,1)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.25.11-60.fc8 ro root=LABEL=root-f8 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.25.11-60.fc8.img
savedefault

=========[boot.f9]============
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes
# to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda6
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
default=saved
timeout=10
splashimage=(hd0,2)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
#hiddenmenu
title Fedora 9 (2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686) SDB3
root (hd0,2)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686 ro root=LABEL=root-f9 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686.img
savedefault

=========[root.f8]============
# Drive: /dev/sdb5
# --------------
LABEL=root-f8 / ext3 defaults 1 1
LABEL=boot-f8 /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
LABEL=f-swap swap swap defaults 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0

=========[root.f9]============
# Drive: /dev/sdb6
# --------------
LABEL=root-f9 / ext3 defaults 1 1
LABEL=boot-f9 /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
LABEL=f-swap swap swap defaults 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0

Now you can test this all out:

1) Make sure when you get the first boot-splash screen,
it looks like what you expected but also pay attemtion
to the bread-crumbs - make sure they are what they are
supposed to be.

2) If you proceed to a fedora-8 or fedora-9 OS, again check
the bread-crumbs!

3) Finally, make sure that you pay attention to the very beginning
of the boot process; particularly where drives are mounted, verified,
and checked - make sure they are the correct ones! It took me a long
time to figure out why I was consistently getting my old f8 up and
running instead of the NEW partitions as I was expecting and it turned
turned out to be the fact that the new partitions were CLONES of the
original drives much so that the /boot and /etc/fstabs were using UUIDs
and "hard links" to the old F8 system and required a complete re-labeling
and rewrite of these files in order to make each of them unique and in
the proper partition/drive locations! Doh!

Well, I hope I have not missed or left anything else out, but if I did
please add it to this thread! I hope this somewhat fragmented thread
helps someone else out!

Cheers!
Dan

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Old 08-05-2008, 04:14 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Daniel B. Thurman wrote:


Daniel B. Thurman wrote:
>
> Anne Wilson wrote:
> >
> > On Monday 04 August 2008 18:27:56 Daniel B. Thurman wrote:
> > >
> > > Never mind! I got myself out of the problem!
> > >
> > How? Someone will see this in the archives and will want to know the
> > answer :-)
> >
> > Anne
> >
> ok, fair enough!
>
> I followed Tim's instructions, but did this with Fedora-Live CD:
>
> 1) Boot in Fedora-Live
> + Open Shell Terminal Window
>
> 2) fdisk -l
>
> *** note!!! ***
> + Disk drives are DIFFERENT, not necessarily the same as when
booted

> in Fedora!
>
> For example, when you boot in Fedora (the real thing), the 3
> disks for
> me it was:
> /dev/sda - PATA
> /dev/sdb - SATA-1
> /dev/sdc - SATA-2
>
> In Fedora-Live, is displayed as:
> /dev/sdb (PATA)
> /dev/sdc (SATA-2)
> /dev/sdd (SATA-1)
>
> 3) grub
>
> a) find /grub/stage1
> In my case, it showed:
> (hd1,0) - SATA-2 - boot-sys - the next 2 partitions are the NEW
> drive I am trying to construct per Tim's instructions
> (hd1,1) - SATA-2 - boot-f8
> (hd1,2) - SATA-2 - boot-f9
> (hd2,2) - SATA-1 - boot-f8 - this is my original "untouched"
> drive where I started originally. This was the grub I "popped"
>
> b) setup (hd2)
> (grub has installed the MBR and fixed my original drive problem
> - output was similar to Tim's instructions)
>
> c) quit
> d) Reboot - I was able to get my original drive back up and
running!)

>
> The new drive I am still working on is:
>
> SATA-2 (750GB)
> ======================
> *** Note *** Actual sizes are not exact!
> /dev/sdc1 - boot-sys (100MB)
> /dev/sdc2 - f8-boot (100MB)
> /dev/sdc3 - f9-boot (100MB)
> /dev/sdc4 - Extended Partition
> /dev/sdc5 - f8-root (175GB)
> /dev/sdc6 - f9-root (175GB)
> /dev/sdc7 - f-App1 (351GB)
> /dev/sdc8 - swap (~5GB) (I have 2GB RAM)
>
I have found in 3b, above: "setup (hd2)", it is the same as if
you used "setup (hd2.0)". I have found that once you have the
partitions for 3 boot directories, boot-sys, boot-f8, and boot-f9,
you can either copy over the existing f8 and/or f9 boot partitions
into the new respective locations (as I did), and as for the boot-sys
partition, I simply copied over my f8 boot partition, and stripped
everything above grub directory.

While you are at it, you can also copy over your root-f8 and root-f9
files into the root-f8 and root-f9 partitions as well. How you get
these copied over successfully has mixed results (cp -a, tar, GParted),
but if you rather use a true clone program, try CloneZilla

As a tool for tracking/verification, in each of the 3 partitions,
I created bread-crumbs as empty files: BOOT-SYS, BOOT-F8, BOOT-F9 in
each of the respective directories so that I can ensure that these
directories are easily identifiable and not mistaken for something else
along the way.

At this point, I have also found that I needed to run grub setup on each
of these 3 boot partitions; similar to above instructions:

Boot up the system, if you cannot get into a grub-display at boot-time,
you may need to boot in Fedora-Live or Rescue CD. If you can get a
grub splash-screen at bootup (w/o CDs), the simply hit 'c' for command.

# grub
grub> find /grub/stage1 (note where your 3 partitions are)
(hd0.0) <-- boot-sys (/dev/sdb1)
(hd0,1) <-- boot-f8 (/dev/sdb2)
(hd0,2) <-- boot-f9 (/dev/sdb3)
(hd1,2)

NOTE! Grub saw things differently again. I am assuming that the
appearance

of this new order, may have to do with the device.maps that I had before
from the original f8 installation, and for whatever the reasons, it
pays to

make SURE you are "in sync" with what grub actually reports.


Ok, with a review, I know why Grub was different in it's order of seeing
things. The above find list was due to the fact that I was booting directly
onto the SATA-2 drive - a change in the BIOs as to which boot drive is
the primary boot drive! Had I booted on my original drive (SATA-1)
the outcome is different as follows:

grub> find /grub/stage1
(hd1,0)
(hd1,1)
(hd1,2)
(hd2,2)


Remember about leaving breadcrumbs earlier? If you are not sure which
drive is which, you can try searching in this way:

grub> find BOOT-SYS
(hd0.0)
grub> find BOOT-F8
(hd0.1)
grub> find BOOT-F9
(hd0.2)

Note: Now we can go ahead to create grub-bootable partitions
for each of the 3 partitions we created earlier:

grub> root (hd0,0)
grub> setup (hd0,0)
<results are shown here>

grub> root (hd0,1)
grub> setup (hd0,1)
<results are shown here>

grub> root (hd0,2)
grub> setup (hd0,2)
<results are shown here>

grub> quit


Now it is time to edit the grub.conf files for each of the 3 partitions.

=========[boot.sys]============
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this
file

# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda5
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
#hiddenmenu
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
default=saved
timeout=5

title Fedora 8 SDB1
rootnoverify (hd0,1)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Fedora 9
rootnoverify (hd0,2)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows 2000
rootnoverify (hd1,0)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows XP
rootnoverify (hd1,1)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows Vista
rootnoverify (hd1,2)
chainloader +1
savedefault

Note: You see the "SDB1" tag? I wanted to make sure
that I am actually using the correct boot partition and not
from some other boot partition from somewhere else. I
ran into this trap before - and the reasons has to do with
the way grub finds files (in a different order), mis-configured
boot-grub files, and/or /etc/fstab files and it becomes much
easier to track and identify things by leaving bread-crumbs
to aide in debugging, IMO.


I also found that I cannot boot the Windows drives- this is due to
the fact that the SATA-2 drive does NOT has windows partitions
in them. So, it looks like that each drives's boot partitions chain-
loaders cannot traverse drives UNLESS of course you hardwire these
instead of trying to keep things generic in the boot-sys partition?

So I plan to place the windows (chain-loaders) text into the boot-wins
partition's grub.conf file. I planned to make the original drive into a
Windows only drive - and will remove the original f8 copy out of the
SATA-1 partitions. I think this will work and will report back if this
is not so - otherwise if I don't report back - it works as planned.




=========[boot.f8]============

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes
# to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda5
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
#hiddenmenu
splashimage=(hd0,1)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
default=saved
timeout=5

title Fedora 8 (2.6.25.11-60.fc8) SDB2
root (hd0,1)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.25.11-60.fc8 ro root=LABEL=root-f8 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.25.11-60.fc8.img
savedefault

=========[boot.f9]============
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes
# to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda6
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
default=saved
timeout=10
splashimage=(hd0,2)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
#hiddenmenu
title Fedora 9 (2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686) SDB3
root (hd0,2)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686 ro root=LABEL=root-f9 rhgb
quiet

initrd /initrd-2.6.25.11-97.fc9.i686.img
savedefault

=========[root.f8]============
# Drive: /dev/sdb5
# --------------
LABEL=root-f8 / ext3 defaults 1 1
LABEL=boot-f8 /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
LABEL=f-swap swap swap defaults 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0

=========[root.f9]============
# Drive: /dev/sdb6
# --------------
LABEL=root-f9 / ext3 defaults 1 1
LABEL=boot-f9 /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
LABEL=f-swap swap swap defaults 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0

Now you can test this all out:

1) Make sure when you get the first boot-splash screen,
it looks like what you expected but also pay attemtion
to the bread-crumbs - make sure they are what they are
supposed to be.

2) If you proceed to a fedora-8 or fedora-9 OS, again check
the bread-crumbs!

3) Finally, make sure that you pay attention to the very beginning
of the boot process; particularly where drives are mounted, verified,
and checked - make sure they are the correct ones! It took me a long
time to figure out why I was consistently getting my old f8 up and
running instead of the NEW partitions as I was expecting and it turned
turned out to be the fact that the new partitions were CLONES of the
original drives much so that the /boot and /etc/fstabs were using
UUIDs
and "hard links" to the old F8 system and required a complete
re-labeling

and rewrite of these files in order to make each of them unique and in
the proper partition/drive locations! Doh!

Well, I hope I have not missed or left anything else out, but if I did
please add it to this thread! I hope this somewhat fragmented thread
helps someone else out!

Cheers!
Dan

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Old 08-11-2008, 03:36 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Tom Horsley wrote:


On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 19:47:13 -0700
Dan Thurman <dant@cdkkt.com> wrote:

> Does anyone have any advice in how to do this up properly?

chainloader is what I use. I've got a partition with nothing
but grub on it (used to be a /boot partition for an old
fedora, and I kept it around to just use for grub), and a
grub.conf file that looks like:

default=0
timeout=10
splashimage=(hd0,1)/grub/zooty.xpm.gz
title Fedora 8 x86_64
rootnoverify (hd0,2)
chainloader +1
title Fedora 8 i386
rootnoverify (hd0,7)
chainloader +1
title Fedora 9 x86_64
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
title Fedora 9 i386
rootnoverify (hd0,4)
chainloader +1


The layout of my drives and partitions:

=========================+======================== =====
Fedora drive: 750GB | Windows drive: 320GB
DRIVE 1: SDA | DRIVE 2: SDB
=========================+======================== =====
sda1 ext3 boot-sys 100M | sdb1 ntfs w2kPro 35G
sda2 ext3 boot-f8 100M | sdb2 ntfs XP 35G
sda2 ext3 boot-f9 100M | sdb3 ntfs Vista 50G
sda4 ---- Extended | sdb4 ---- Extended
sda5 ext3 root-f8 175G | sdb5 ext3 *boot-win 100M
sda6 ext3 root-f9 175G | sdb6 ntfs w-App1 <rest>
sda7 ext3 f-App1 <rest> |
sad8 swap ~5G |
=========================+======================== =====
(*) - This partition may be removed if deemed unnecessary.

Notes:
======
1) The BIOS can be changed to the specific primary boot drive,
and I can easily boot the fedora drive w/ grub boot-loader
BIOs switch, and boot the currently active Windows OS partition.
I can change the active partitions easily using the Computer->
Manage->Disk Management application.

2) Windows drive partitions and installing OS:

If you want each partition to be standalone, be sure
to make the partition being installed active first before
using the OS install CD. Windows 2K Pro has limited LBA
so install w2kPro first and upon completion, update the
registry change to add the EnableBigLba DWORD=1 entry
before continuing to other M$ OSes partitions. Just
remember to set the active partition to the next Win-OS
being CD installed.

I have spent several days rebuilding my windows-only drive;
w2kPro, XP, and Vista. To make a long story short, I made a lot
of personal mistakes and ended up trashing the windows partitions
(LBA). I have now rebuilt the Win-drive and I am ready to get it
all working under the Grub configuration above - and I have ran
into the same troubles as I had before the trashing i.e., I cannot
figure out why I cannot get the chain-loaders to work for w2kPro
and XP, but it works for Vista now (go figure!). Keep in mind,
that the primary boot drive is SDA - so, grub is from SDA's
perspective when it sees itself in relation to other drives
and may be seen differently should you change your primary boot
drive to another drive, that is, "flipping" the drive around
via the BIOs. It is interesting to see how grub "sees" things.

Ever since I could not figure out how to get the chain loaders
to see w2kPro/Xp - I tried another method by adding a ext3
logical partition at sdb5 as seem in the above chart and I was
able to change the MBR to grub. I was hoping to get grub @ SDA
primary boot to "see" this partition and launch from it. No dice.
It was easy to restore the MBR for w2kPro, Just set the active
partition to sdb1, reboot with OS's CD, go into Recovery console,
and type in: fixmbr, reboot and you have your original MBR back.

Interestingly, if I change the primary boot to the windows drive,
the Grub boot-loader comes up and I was able to select w2kPro, XP,
and Vista just fine.

I wonder if the problem is directly related to the use of chain-loaders
in that it cannot cross physical drive boundaries and is confined to
the active drive and its partitions?

Here is my boot-sys grub.conf file:
====================================
# cat /media/boot-sys/grub/grub.conf
# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/sda5
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
#hiddenmenu
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
default=saved
timeout=5

title Fedora 8 (SDA1)
rootnoverify (hd0,1) (works!)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Fedora 9
rootnoverify (hd0,2) (works!)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows 2000
rootnoverify (hd1,0) (fails!)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows XP
rootnoverify (hd1,1) (fails!)
chainloader +1
savedefault
title Windows Vista
rootnoverify (hd1,2) (works!)
chainloader +1
savedefault


Can anyone advise?

Thanks!
Dan

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Old 08-11-2008, 08:50 PM
Tom Horsley
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:36:43 -0700
"Daniel B. Thurman" <dant@cdkkt.com> wrote:

> I cannot
> figure out why I cannot get the chain-loaders to work for w2kPro
> and XP, but it works for Vista now (go figure!).

It is entirely possible that XP and W2K will only boot if they
believe they live on the primary disk. Could be (not sure) that
the only way to use grub for everything is if the main grub
partition with all the chainloader specs is on the same disk
with XP. The fact that vista will boot leads me to suspect
this may be the case, vista's boot code may not be as braindamaged
as XP and W2k. The last time I had linux and XP on the same system,
they were both on the same disk with grub and I had no problems
(other than the problem that I couldn't install XP at all if
there was an ext3 partition anywhere on any sata disk, but I solved that
by wiping all the disks clean and installing XP first :-).

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Old 08-11-2008, 09:18 PM
"Mikkel L. Ellertson"
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Tom Horsley wrote:

On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:36:43 -0700
"Daniel B. Thurman" <dant@cdkkt.com> wrote:


I cannot
figure out why I cannot get the chain-loaders to work for w2kPro
and XP, but it works for Vista now (go figure!).


It is entirely possible that XP and W2K will only boot if they
believe they live on the primary disk. Could be (not sure) that
the only way to use grub for everything is if the main grub
partition with all the chainloader specs is on the same disk
with XP. The fact that vista will boot leads me to suspect
this may be the case, vista's boot code may not be as braindamaged
as XP and W2k. The last time I had linux and XP on the same system,
they were both on the same disk with grub and I had no problems
(other than the problem that I couldn't install XP at all if
there was an ext3 partition anywhere on any sata disk, but I solved that
by wiping all the disks clean and installing XP first :-).

You can remap the BIOS drive designations from Grub, so that XP and
W2K think they are booting from the drive they expect. (See the map
option.) It also works when you are chainloading to things loke a
bootable USB drive that is set so that the system boots from it.
(Boot from USB BIOS option.)


Mikkel
--

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons,
for thou art crunchy and taste good with Ketchup!

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Old 08-11-2008, 09:53 PM
Lyvim Xaphir
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

On Mon, 2008-08-11 at 16:50 -0400, Tom Horsley wrote:
> On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:36:43 -0700
> "Daniel B. Thurman" <dant@cdkkt.com> wrote:
>
> > I cannot
> > figure out why I cannot get the chain-loaders to work for w2kPro
> > and XP, but it works for Vista now (go figure!).
>
> It is entirely possible that XP and W2K will only boot if they
> believe they live on the primary disk. Could be (not sure) that
> the only way to use grub for everything is if the main grub
> partition with all the chainloader specs is on the same disk
> with XP.

That's not true, the grub can be installed to the mbr of an sda and the
chainloader can be configured to boot xp on sdb. I've done this in
several cases.



> The fact that vista will boot leads me to suspect
> this may be the case, vista's boot code may not be as braindamaged
> as XP and W2k. The last time I had linux and XP on the same system,
> they were both on the same disk with grub and I had no problems
> (other than the problem that I couldn't install XP at all if
> there was an ext3 partition anywhere on any sata disk, but I solved that
> by wiping all the disks clean and installing XP first :-).

When XP is installed first, it really ought to be put on the last
cylinders of the hard drive, say a primary of sda2, and set up sda1 as
an extended partition with logicals for fedora installation. Wnen
fedora installs, it will see xp on sda2 and set up an "other" for it.

XP does not have to be on the primary drive in order to work tho. You
could just as easily put linux on an sda and throw xp on an sdb. The
trick is to get the ntfs partition setup and formatted first, before you
boot the xp install disk.

This is true for both XP32 and XP64 editions.

LX

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Old 08-11-2008, 11:01 PM
"Daniel B. Thurman"
 
Default F8/F9 Multiboot question

Lyvim Xaphir wrote:


On Mon, 2008-08-11 at 16:50 -0400, Tom Horsley wrote:
> On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:36:43 -0700
> "Daniel B. Thurman" <dant@cdkkt.com> wrote:
>
> > I cannot
> > figure out why I cannot get the chain-loaders to work for w2kPro
> > and XP, but it works for Vista now (go figure!).
>
> It is entirely possible that XP and W2K will only boot if they
> believe they live on the primary disk. Could be (not sure) that
> the only way to use grub for everything is if the main grub
> partition with all the chainloader specs is on the same disk
> with XP.

That's not true, the grub can be installed to the mbr of an sda and the
chainloader can be configured to boot xp on sdb. I've done this in
several cases.


As I pointed out, I was ABLE to boot w2kPro, XP, and Vista
ONLY if my BIOs is set to boot Windows-Drive as the
Primary boot drive. Heck - the boot-loader IS Grub! It WORKS
and note that the boot-win is a logical partition! As the table
shows, for the Windows drive, partition-1 is w2kPro, 2nd is XP,
3rd is Vista, 5th is boot-win, and 6th is w-App1

The problem is, that if I switch via BIOs primary boot drive
to a Fedora-ONLY drive for which the generic boot-sys has
chain-loader entries, Grub sees F8, F9, and Vista - but does
not see w2kPro nor XP!

What I also found oddly enough was that using the Fedora drive
as the primary - I grub edited the w2kPro line and changed root(hd1.0)
to root (hd1,4), effect I was calling boot-win, and it does come up with
grub but the splash screen was missing only because of boot-win's assignment
is based on hd(0,0) which is not the cause when booting off the Fedora drive
which is actually hd0,0! So, for fun, I attempted to grub-edit the
boot-win's

w2kPro entry only to find that in edit mode, the text was scrambled - so it
wasn't possible to edit this entry in order to test it out - so I
dropped it. Seems

that grub does not like "cross-drive" entries?

I will try and test out the concept of moving XP into the 5th partition
of the
windows drive, stealing from w-App1 and see what that looks like. I
like the

idea of having a single primary/extended partition for which all OS's can be
logically assigned therein and not worry too much about running out of
primary

partitions, but I wonder what the "penalty" is in doing so?


> The fact that vista will boot leads me to suspect
> this may be the case, vista's boot code may not be as braindamaged
> as XP and W2k. The last time I had linux and XP on the same system,
> they were both on the same disk with grub and I had no problems
> (other than the problem that I couldn't install XP at all if
> there was an ext3 partition anywhere on any sata disk, but I solved
that

> by wiping all the disks clean and installing XP first :-).

When XP is installed first, it really ought to be put on the last
cylinders of the hard drive, say a primary of sda2, and set up sda1 as
an extended partition with logicals for fedora installation. Wnen
fedora installs, it will see xp on sda2 and set up an "other" for it.


Why? I started with a "blank-state" drive (i.e. a raw drive),
and installed in order: w2kPro, XP, then Vista but only
by assigning active partitions before using the install CD
so and what is the difference of having Fedora (or any partition
manager) first lay down the NTFS partition before installing the
boot CDs? By making each partition active before installing
an OS - it constrains the OS to the partition and more importantly,
it recognized the "active" partition as "C:" - I was able to test and
verify this. But in the case of w2kPro - the problem you run into is
the LBA limit - so your 1/2/3rd partition MUST be within the
132XXX space confines and once you finish installing w2kPro,
don't forget to set the registry for w2kPro with the EnableBigLba
DWORD=1, from whence the other OS's (XP/Vista) takes care of
itself, or so it seems.


XP does not have to be on the primary drive in order to work tho. You
could just as easily put linux on an sda and throw xp on an sdb. The
trick is to get the ntfs partition setup and formatted first, before you
boot the xp install disk.


See comments above.


This is true for both XP32 and XP64 editions.


See comments above.

I am still confused as to why using the Grub on a Primary boot
drive fails to see w2kPro/XP on a secondary drive but sees
Vista!? So, I wonder where the real problem is....

Dan

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