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Old 07-20-2008, 06:46 PM
Beartooth
 
Default policy question

Can anybody explain to a non-technoid how the developers go about
deciding whether a new thing gets added to the current Fedora release, or
held to become part of the next?

I have no axe to grind here, not even a specific instance; it
just happened to occur to me that I have no idea how that process works,
and I think it's an interesting question.

--
Beartooth Staffwright, PhD, Neo-Redneck Linux Convert
Fedora 8 & 9; Alpine 1.10, Pan 0.132; Privoxy 3.0.6;
nine (count 'em -- nine) different browsers
Remember I know precious little of what I am talking about.

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Old 07-20-2008, 07:02 PM
Rahul Sundaram
 
Default policy question

Beartooth wrote:
Can anybody explain to a non-technoid how the developers go about
deciding whether a new thing gets added to the current Fedora release, or
held to become part of the next?


Can you explain what you mean by a "new thing"? Do you mean a new
software package or new feature or something else?


New packages go through a peer review process described in

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Package_Review_Process

They should in minimum pass the MUST requirements

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Packaging/ReviewGuidelines

Major features before a new release go through a feature process
described in


http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/Policy

A release is done as per the release criteria

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/QA#Release_Testing

Individual features have to go through the testing plan and if that
fails would be postponed to the next release. One example here is
swfdec, a free and open source flash player that was installed in the
Fedora 9 beta and removed in the final release because it failed the
criteria set in


https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/QA/TestResults/Fedora9Swfdec/Rawhide

It is a combination of release schedule set by release engineering, QA
team determining release critical bugs and Fedora Engineering steering
committee managing the overall process.


Post release, it is generally the people maintaining the package
(whether a individual or a team) determines whether it should be made
available as a update. One recommendation is not to break ABI post release.


https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/PackageMaintainers/PackagingTricks

Rahul

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Old 07-21-2008, 07:10 PM
Beartooth
 
Default policy question

On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 00:32:01 +0530, Rahul Sundaram wrote:

> Beartooth wrote:
>> Can anybody explain to a non-technoid how the developers go about
>> deciding whether a new thing gets added to the current Fedora release,
>> or held to become part of the next?
>
> Can you explain what you mean by a "new thing"?
[snipperoo : lots of great stuff]

Not very well, I'm afraid. It's a disadvantage autodidacts are
always at -- worth it, but always at it. I chose a deliberately vague
term, partly because of all the things I don't know, and partly because
my thinking isn't that precise yet.

I don't even know if there's a sharp line between an app and an
applet, or a package and a feature, for instance. Or, say, between things
yum can find, and ones it can't -- such as Konqueror, which I use under
Gnome. (I once tried not installing KDE at all, planning to install just
Konqueror and whatever it brought with it; but couldn't till a guru told
me more.)

> Do you mean a new software package or new feature or something else?

All of those, for sure. Burning media is a good example of a job
that's gotten vastly easier for the uninitiated over the years (and
running GPS-interfacing topographic map software of one that I'm sure
will yet). I don't recall, but I'd guess, that simplifying the K3B front
end happened or could have happened during a release, but that
introducing Brasero probably came with a new release.

I did know from one of the LUGs I follow that more than I dream
of gets added in, or sometimes obsoleted out, constantly. I've also
noticed several times that the changes accompanying a new release may be
vast -- as replacing pirut with package-kit seems to me, and the
introduction of SELinux was to more people than just me.

That set me wondering if there were systematic priorities such as
urgency on one hand, new convenient abilities on another, and something
else again on the gripping hand. And how it might be that new bugs find a
way into things as seemingly familiar for so long as Anaconda.

I hope I'm making some sense. Anyway, the rest of your answer
(all that good stuff I've cut here) will give me plenty to chew on for
quite a while. I knew, of course, that y'all'd've thought it through way
beyond me -- but not that you'd've articulated so much of it explicitly,
and even set it out in public. Many thanks!

--
Beartooth Staffwright, PhD, Neo-Redneck Linux Convert
Fedora 8 & 9; Alpine 1.10, Pan 0.132; Privoxy 3.0.6;
nine (count 'em -- nine) different browsers
Remember I know precious little of what I am talking about.

--
fedora-list mailing list
fedora-list@redhat.com
To unsubscribe: https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/fedora-list
 

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