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Old 07-04-2011, 05:07 PM
Curt Tresenriter
 
Default intro

Hi all,

I've been lurking here for a month or two and thought it was time I
introduce myself.


I'm an unemployed truck driver and neon tube bender living in northern
Illinois.
I have a bit of an education. I attended Cisco Academy back in 2003 but
haven't been motivated to sit for the exam yet and I've had just enough
electronics training to be dangerous.


I've been using Ubuntu since the beginning and have loved it
unconditionally ...until recently.
Loyalty will surely prompt me to try 11.xx and Unity again soon but I
have to confess Linux Mint is wooing me a bit. One of these days I'm
going to dive in to LFS with both feet and hopefully get a real
GNU/Linux education.
I still have Gutsy Gibbon running on one machine and have never had a
problem with it. Another machine runs Hardy but the hard disk is on it's
last legs. I'm planning on trying out Clonezilla or something else (any
other suggestions for this job?) to get that installation onto a healthy
drive.


I like to read, listen to and make music - I'm a perennial guitar
student and passable rhythm player, attempting to teach myself finger
picking.
I love the old Mississippi Delta and other Blues players and the Folkies
like Davey Graham, Bert Jansch, etc. and the /real/ Country and
Bluegrass pickers - Country doesn't mean much anymore since Nashville
has been co-opted by what they are now calling "Real Country" (oh
please!!!), you know - the "hat" bands.... not to disparage the
musicians, some of those guitarists are consummate players and they
surround themselves with very talented sidemen/women.


I'm a lifelong fan of radio (remember when music on radio used to be
good?), especially short wave and would choose radio over television any
day.


Well, this is probably enough if not too much information so I'll stop now.

Cheers,
Curt
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Old 07-06-2011, 04:41 AM
NoOp
 
Default intro

On 07/04/2011 09:07 AM, Curt Tresenriter wrote:
...
> I still have Gutsy Gibbon running on one machine and have never had a
> problem with it. Another machine runs Hardy but the hard disk is on it's
> last legs. I'm planning on trying out Clonezilla or something else (any
> other suggestions for this job?) to get that installation onto a healthy
> drive.
...

Welcome to the list Curt.

Install the new drive on the system, boot from a liveCD, ensure both
drives are not mounted & use gparted copy. That will copy the data from
the old drive to the new drive bit-for-bit. You can then test by
disconnecting the old drive & booting with the new drive.

Alternate method is to use dd:
<http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/19141/clone-a-hard-drive-using-an-ubuntu-live-cd/>

You may find this of interest:
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.linux.ubuntu.user/202144
[dd + gparted + UUID]


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Old 07-12-2011, 12:57 PM
Curt Tresenriter
 
Default intro

On 07/05/2011 10:41 PM, NoOp wrote:

On 07/04/2011 09:07 AM, Curt Tresenriter wrote:
...

I still have Gutsy Gibbon running on one machine and have never had a
problem with it. Another machine runs Hardy but the hard disk is on it's
last legs. I'm planning on trying out Clonezilla or something else (any
other suggestions for this job?) to get that installation onto a healthy
drive.

...

Welcome to the list Curt.

Install the new drive on the system, boot from a liveCD, ensure both
drives are not mounted& use gparted copy. That will copy the data from
the old drive to the new drive bit-for-bit. You can then test by
disconnecting the old drive& booting with the new drive.

Alternate method is to use dd:
<http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/19141/clone-a-hard-drive-using-an-ubuntu-live-cd/>

You may find this of interest:
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.linux.ubuntu.user/202144
[dd + gparted + UUID]


Thanks NoOp, for the welcome and for the links - especially the one on
changing the uuid.

I'm about ready to give gparted a try.

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Old 07-12-2011, 12:57 PM
Curt Tresenriter
 
Default intro

On 07/05/2011 10:41 PM, NoOp wrote:

On 07/04/2011 09:07 AM, Curt Tresenriter wrote:
...

I still have Gutsy Gibbon running on one machine and have never had a
problem with it. Another machine runs Hardy but the hard disk is on it's
last legs. I'm planning on trying out Clonezilla or something else (any
other suggestions for this job?) to get that installation onto a healthy
drive.

...

Welcome to the list Curt.

Install the new drive on the system, boot from a liveCD, ensure both
drives are not mounted& use gparted copy. That will copy the data from
the old drive to the new drive bit-for-bit. You can then test by
disconnecting the old drive& booting with the new drive.

Alternate method is to use dd:
<http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/19141/clone-a-hard-drive-using-an-ubuntu-live-cd/>

You may find this of interest:
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.linux.ubuntu.user/202144
[dd + gparted + UUID]


Thanks NoOp, for the welcome and for the links - especially the one on
changing the uuid.

I'm about ready to give gparted a try.

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Old 02-13-2012, 08:07 PM
stuart edgecombe
 
Default intro

Hi

My name is Stuart and I am a primary school teacher working at the International School of Geneva. I am using edubuntu 11.10 on my classroom computers and loving it. My IT director gave me permission to keep some old lenovos that were at the end of their lease and put edubuntu on them. This has let me increase my class computer from 3 desktops to 7 desktops and 4 thinkpads.


It all started from savaging from iMacs from the rubbish tip....

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Old 02-13-2012, 08:24 PM
David Groos
 
Default intro

Hey Stuart -- Sounds great! I got started the same way but since I had access to recycled PC's, I started with those. Now I've got almost 50 of them (a couple other teachers use them too, now.) Have fun exploring and implementing and you'll find an interested and helpful audience for your challenges and success on this list-server.

David G.


On Feb 13, 2012, at 2:07 PM, stuart edgecombe wrote:

> Hi
>
> My name is Stuart and I am a primary school teacher working at the International School of Geneva. I am using edubuntu 11.10 on my classroom computers and loving it. My IT director gave me permission to keep some old lenovos that were at the end of their lease and put edubuntu on them. This has let me increase my class computer from 3 desktops to 7 desktops and 4 thinkpads.
> It all started from savaging from iMacs from the rubbish tip....
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> ubuntu-education@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-education


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Old 03-07-2012, 11:33 AM
Guido Arnold
 
Default intro

Hello Stuart,

2012/2/13 stuart edgecombe <stuart.edgecombe@gmail.com>:

> computers and loving it. My IT director gave me permission to keep some old
> lenovos that were at the end of their lease and put edubuntu on them. This

That's great! Was it hard to convince him?

> It all started from savaging from iMacs from the rubbish tip....

I don't understand this. Could you explain it a little more for me?

Thanks,

Guido

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guido@fsfe.org

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Old 01-26-2014, 10:17 PM
Robin
 
Default Intro

Hello,

"Elfy" sent me here from Ubuntu Discourse when I expressed some interest
in helping with this awesome distro in some small way.


I have no technical expertise to lend, in fact I'm a bit technophobic.
Yet I have become a Xubuntu "fan" since Lucid (10.04), when Xubuntu was
"the lightweight Ubuntu for older computers." I have a 12-year-old Dell
Dimension with an old Celeron processor (that supports pae) and 512 of
RAM. It originally ran Windows XP.


Other than "bragging about Xubuntu," I don't have much to contribute.
Like most users probably, there are a few things that I always change
right after an installation to speed things up on this old relic, like
turning off startup items I don't use and reducing swappiness, that sort
of thing.


I realize that Xubuntu is no longer "the lightweight Ubuntu for older
computers" (according to your Strategy Document) since Lubuntu has come
along, but I would plead with this team to bear a couple of things in
mind at least for the 13.04 release:


We're about to be joined by a lot of new users - right at the very same
time that Windows XP reaches EOL. Many many MANY of those folks will be
looking at the Ubuntu family for a replacement, and the majority of them
may have "older" hardware. Perhaps not as scrawny as mine, but modest
nonetheless. While I realize that Xfce lends itself to efficiency, I've
found that more recent versions of Xubuntu are slower and more resource
intensive than 12.04 which I'm using now. While I can add RAM easily
enough, a lot of the folks who will be joining us soon would rather just
buy a new computer. So my plea is, please - at least just for 14.04,
keep Xubuntu "lean and mean" for all the novice users who are sure to be
joining us soon!


I have written about desktop Linux from a "casual" user's perspective on
my humble little weblog for about 2 years, and while I have strayed to
other distros, I always "run home" to Xubuntu when the others (SalixOS,
PCLinuxOS, Mint, even Bodhi) let me down. Lately I've decided to stay
put and become much more familar with just one, rather than bounce
around confusing myself. Other than writing about it and once in a
while answering a newbie question on the forums and installing Xubuntu
for a friend or two, I'm not sure what else I have to offer, but I'd
love to help in some way if I can.


Very cordially and respectfully,
Robin

"Robin" - on Ubuntu Discourse
"robin7" - on Ubuntu Forums
"adoptedsidekick" - on wordpress.com
http://adoptedsidekick.wordpress.com



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Old 01-26-2014, 11:10 PM
Pasi Lallinaho
 
Default Intro

Hey Robin,

thanks for your interest and welcome! I've added comments inline.

On 27/01/14 00:17, Robin wrote:
> Hello,
>
> "Elfy" sent me here from Ubuntu Discourse when I expressed some
> interest in helping with this awesome distro in some small way.
>
> I have no technical expertise to lend, in fact I'm a bit technophobic.

That's fine! Putting out an operating system (and keep on doing it every
6 months) requires much more than just technical people.

> Yet I have become a Xubuntu "fan" since Lucid (10.04), when Xubuntu
> was "the lightweight Ubuntu for older computers." I have a
> 12-year-old Dell Dimension with an old Celeron processor (that
> supports pae) and 512 of RAM. It originally ran Windows XP.
>
> Other than "bragging about Xubuntu," I don't have much to contribute.
> Like most users probably, there are a few things that I always change
> right after an installation to speed things up on this old relic, like
> turning off startup items I don't use and reducing swappiness, that
> sort of thing.

Ultimately, it always comes to deciding and shipping sane defaults; we
can never please everybody. Whether you needed to tweak the system for
performance or just wanted to change the appearance is a different thing.

If you are interested in sharing your experiences on getting Xubuntu run
smoother on lower end computers, we do accept guest writer posts for the
blog on our website. Be in touch with me [1] or Elizabeth Krumbach [2]
if this sounds like something you'd like to do.

> I realize that Xubuntu is no longer "the lightweight Ubuntu for older
> computers" (according to your Strategy Document) since Lubuntu has
> come along, but I would plead with this team to bear a couple of
> things in mind at least for the 13.04 release:
>
> We're about to be joined by a lot of new users - right at the very
> same time that Windows XP reaches EOL. Many many MANY of those folks
> will be looking at the Ubuntu family for a replacement, and the
> majority of them may have "older" hardware. Perhaps not as scrawny as
> mine, but modest nonetheless. While I realize that Xfce lends itself
> to efficiency, I've found that more recent versions of Xubuntu are
> slower and more resource intensive than 12.04 which I'm using now.

The 14.04 release will be 2 years newer than 12.04 (and much newer than
XP), but the computers stay the same. Newer operating systems will be
slower, and will get slower as we go.

> While I can add RAM easily enough, a lot of the folks who will be
> joining us soon would rather just buy a new computer. So my plea is,
> please - at least just for 14.04, keep Xubuntu "lean and mean" for all
> the novice users who are sure to be joining us soon!

While being lightweight isn't our primary focus any more, we aren't
exactly dumping in loads of new stuff. To be exact, many new things the
Xubuntu team has introduced in the last years have probably been making
Xubuntu lighter by being able to remove some depends.

The main performance burden comes from the Ubuntu core itself; a lot of
that is something we barely can help. Even when we can, we have to try
to balance between being as close to Ubuntu as possible (to avoid
maintaining burden, and because we *are* an official Ubuntu flavor) and
being true to our own ideals and strategy document (which many times
leaves us with more maintaining burden or one-off tasks to be done).

I do hope Xubuntu 14.04 will be a release that people who are coming
from Windows XP, have a lower end machine and want to try out Linux can
enjoy and use smoothly enough in daily use. For those who can't, I
really don't think Lubuntu is a bad option, or that we're losing
anything if people decide to use Lubuntu (or any other lightweight Linux
OS) instead.

> I have written about desktop Linux from a "casual" user's perspective
> on my humble little weblog for about 2 years, and while I have strayed
> to other distros, I always "run home" to Xubuntu when the others
> (SalixOS, PCLinuxOS, Mint, even Bodhi) let me down. Lately I've
> decided to stay put and become much more familar with just one, rather
> than bounce around confusing myself.

It's nice to hear you have found that Xubuntu is the best system for you
and that you have decided to learn more about it.

> Other than writing about it and once in a while answering a newbie
> question on the forums and installing Xubuntu for a friend or two, I'm
> not sure what else I have to offer, but I'd love to help in some way
> if I can.

As I said, releasing an operating system requires a variety of different
skills; see the Get Involved [3] section for a listing of different
areas where you can help, and get in touch with us if you need any
further information (the documentation isn't complete, so you probably
will).

> Very cordially and respectfully,
> Robin
>
> "Robin" - on Ubuntu Discourse
> "robin7" - on Ubuntu Forums
> "adoptedsidekick" - on wordpress.com
> http://adoptedsidekick.wordpress.com

Our team is pretty active on IRC, so you can find many of us online at
#xubuntu-devel on the Freenode IRC network. In addition to being able to
get to know people, you can always learn much about the way we do things
and communicate.

Furthermore, we run meetings regularly on Thursdays at 19UTC on the same
channel; if you sould join us, that would be great! Welcome again!

Cheers,
Pasi Lallinaho
Xubuntu Project Lead

[1] knome in IRC
[2] pleia2 in IRC, lyz (a) ubuntu.com
[3] http://xubuntu.org/contribute/

--
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Leader of Shimmer Project and Xubuntu http://shimmerproject.org/
Graphic artist, webdesigner, Ubuntu member http://xubuntu.org/


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Old 01-26-2014, 11:30 PM
Joan Advincula
 
Default Intro

If I might intrude, there is the PAE issue which will still make Xubuntu unusable on older hardware no matter how light anyone makes it.

Best,

Joan Advincula

UoPeople Student Ambassador

@iamMJae

On Jan 27, 2014 7:11 AM, "Pasi Lallinaho" <pasi@shimmerproject.org> wrote:
Hey Robin,



thanks for your interest and welcome! I've added comments inline.



On 27/01/14 00:17, Robin wrote:

> Hello,

>

> "Elfy" sent me here from Ubuntu Discourse when I expressed some

> interest in helping with this awesome distro in some small way.

>

> I have no technical expertise to lend, in fact I'm a bit technophobic.



That's fine! Putting out an operating system (and keep on doing it every

6 months) requires much more than just technical people.



> Yet I have become a Xubuntu "fan" since Lucid (10.04), when Xubuntu

> was "the lightweight Ubuntu for older computers." *I have a

> 12-year-old Dell Dimension with an old Celeron processor (that

> supports pae) and 512 of RAM. *It originally ran Windows XP.

>

> Other than "bragging about Xubuntu," I don't have much to contribute.

> Like most users probably, there are a few things that I always change

> right after an installation to speed things up on this old relic, like

> turning off startup items I don't use and reducing swappiness, that

> sort of thing.



Ultimately, it always comes to deciding and shipping sane defaults; we

can never please everybody. Whether you needed to tweak the system for

performance or just wanted to change the appearance is a different thing.



If you are interested in sharing your experiences on getting Xubuntu run

smoother on lower end computers, we do accept guest writer posts for the

blog on our website. Be in touch with me [1] or Elizabeth Krumbach [2]

if this sounds like something you'd like to do.



> I realize that Xubuntu is no longer "the lightweight Ubuntu for older

> computers" (according to your Strategy Document) since Lubuntu has

> come along, but I would plead with this team to bear a couple of

> things in mind *at least for the 13.04 release:

>

> We're about to be joined by a lot of new users - right at the very

> same time that Windows XP reaches EOL. *Many many MANY of those folks

> will be looking at the Ubuntu family for a replacement, and the

> majority of them may have "older" hardware. *Perhaps not as scrawny as

> mine, but modest nonetheless. *While I realize that Xfce lends itself

> to efficiency, I've found that more recent versions of Xubuntu are

> slower and more resource intensive than 12.04 which I'm using now.



The 14.04 release will be 2 years newer than 12.04 (and much newer than

XP), but the computers stay the same. Newer operating systems will be

slower, and will get slower as we go.



> While I can add RAM easily enough, a lot of the folks who will be

> joining us soon would rather just buy a new computer. So my plea is,

> please - at least just for 14.04, keep Xubuntu "lean and mean" for all

> the novice users who are sure to be joining us soon!



While being lightweight isn't our primary focus any more, we aren't

exactly dumping in loads of new stuff. To be exact, many new things the

Xubuntu team has introduced in the last years have probably been making

Xubuntu lighter by being able to remove some depends.



The main performance burden comes from the Ubuntu core itself; a lot of

that is something we barely can help. Even when we can, we have to try

to balance between being as close to Ubuntu as possible (to avoid

maintaining burden, and because we *are* an official Ubuntu flavor) and

being true to our own ideals and strategy document (which many times

leaves us with more maintaining burden or one-off tasks to be done).



I do hope Xubuntu 14.04 will be a release that people who are coming

from Windows XP, have a lower end machine and want to try out Linux can

enjoy and use smoothly enough in daily use. For those who can't, I

really don't think Lubuntu is a bad option, or that we're losing

anything if people decide to use Lubuntu (or any other lightweight Linux

OS) instead.



> I have written about desktop Linux from a "casual" user's perspective

> on my humble little weblog for about 2 years, and while I have strayed

> to other distros, I always "run home" to Xubuntu when the others

> (SalixOS, PCLinuxOS, Mint, even Bodhi) let me down. Lately I've

> decided to stay put and become much more familar with just one, rather

> than bounce around confusing myself.



It's nice to hear you have found that Xubuntu is the best system for you

and that you have decided to learn more about it.



> Other than writing about it and once in a while answering a newbie

> question on the forums and installing Xubuntu for a friend or two, I'm

> not sure what else I have to offer, but I'd love to help in some way

> if I can.



As I said, releasing an operating system requires a variety of different

skills; see the Get Involved [3] section for a listing of different

areas where you can help, and get in touch with us if you need any

further information (the documentation isn't complete, so you probably

will).



> Very cordially and respectfully,

> Robin

>

> "Robin" - on Ubuntu Discourse

> "robin7" - on Ubuntu Forums

> "adoptedsidekick" - on wordpress.com

> http://adoptedsidekick.wordpress.com



Our team is pretty active on IRC, so you can find many of us online at

#xubuntu-devel on the Freenode IRC network. In addition to being able to

get to know people, you can always learn much about the way we do things

and communicate.



Furthermore, we run meetings regularly on Thursdays at 19UTC on the same

channel; if you sould join us, that would be great! Welcome again!



Cheers,

Pasi Lallinaho

Xubuntu Project Lead



[1] knome in IRC

[2] pleia2 in IRC, lyz (a) ubuntu.com

[3] http://xubuntu.org/contribute/



--

Pasi Lallinaho (knome) * * * * * * * * * * * http://open.knome.fi/

Leader of Shimmer Project and Xubuntu * * * http://shimmerproject.org/

Graphic artist, webdesigner, Ubuntu member * http://xubuntu.org/





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