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Old 04-03-2010, 01:36 PM
Hristo Petkov
 
Default The Live CD et al.

Hi,
This story with the completely blind user has another question - how will such a user work with the computer screen and on the computer at all. Anyway.

RE: Live CD
The Live CD is more than O.K. In my view a specification or a quick reference guide in style expert system should be done what the newcomer may or should do after installing the Live CD.

This Expert Guide could be something of the kind:

If you are this and tthis and this case (i686 PC architecture, Desktop, Freelancer) - you may do this and this (install the most appropriate APPs)

If you are a server case - proceed with this and this. ... And don't forget to acquire competitive advantage on the market by installing ClamAV and ClamTk, etc.

If you intend to organise SSH tunneling through HTTPs at 7th level of firewall protection - install Apache server, and
do this and this, etc.


Regards









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Old 04-04-2010, 03:17 PM
"Donald Buchan"
 
Default The Live CD et al.

> Hi,
> This story with the completely blind user has another question - how will
> such a user work with the computer screen and on the computer at all.
> Anyway.
>

I have complete confidence in a blind computer user being able to use the
liveCD, although I have not checked out the accessibility software on it.
I saw a demo a few months ago by a couple of blind computer users at a lug
meeting about accessibility under linux (ubuntu but no matter.) To say I
was impressed would be an understatement; besides being entertained by
their demonstrations of how the accents, cadence, gender, and so on of the
vocal interface were being manipulated (yes, they were trying to entertain
us!) the way the two of them managed to navigate through web pages and
sysadmin put to rest any doubts in my mind how a blind person could use a
linux box as well as a sighted person.

> RE: Live CD
> The Live CD is more than O.K. In my view a specification or a quick
> reference guide in style expert system should be done what the newcomer
> may or should do after installing the Live CD.

This is ultimately what needs to be done if a "full fat" image isn't used;
certainly my experience a couple of weeks ago with the two livecd images
underlined the need for "something" since while an expert user might know
what to do, the liveCD should be a showcase of what the distro can do for
a new user, and if having a killer app -- such as in my case, OO.o -- is
not practical, then "an easy" way, slash that, an obvious guide on how to
install it for the newbie would be crucial.

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Old 04-05-2010, 12:20 PM
Michael Whapples
 
Default The Live CD et al.

I think Donald sums up most of what I would say, certainly in the part
relating to accessibility, it is fully possible and may be a bit of a
surprise when you see it all working (one surprise is how fast regular
users of text to speech software can actually listen to the speech).
Donald points out that he saw the blind users using ubuntu, this is
probably because ubuntu have done some work to make the LiveCD
accessible, however I feel fedora may have more mileage for the more
power user and so why I would like to see greater accessibility on fedora.

Following on the idea that may be the LiveCD is a showcase, yes this is
a good idea as its the first experience someone might get of the
distribution. In my case as a blind user, I must have the gnome
accessibility tools there before I can use it, fedora has that, shame
there not quite set up optimally (that's what I want to try and help
change).

Michael Whapples
On 01/-10/-28163 08:59 PM, Donald Buchan wrote:
>> Hi,
>> This story with the completely blind user has another question - how will
>> such a user work with the computer screen and on the computer at all.
>> Anyway.
>>
>>
> I have complete confidence in a blind computer user being able to use the
> liveCD, although I have not checked out the accessibility software on it.
> I saw a demo a few months ago by a couple of blind computer users at a lug
> meeting about accessibility under linux (ubuntu but no matter.) To say I
> was impressed would be an understatement; besides being entertained by
> their demonstrations of how the accents, cadence, gender, and so on of the
> vocal interface were being manipulated (yes, they were trying to entertain
> us!) the way the two of them managed to navigate through web pages and
> sysadmin put to rest any doubts in my mind how a blind person could use a
> linux box as well as a sighted person.
>
>
>> RE: Live CD
>> The Live CD is more than O.K. In my view a specification or a quick
>> reference guide in style expert system should be done what the newcomer
>> may or should do after installing the Live CD.
>>
> This is ultimately what needs to be done if a "full fat" image isn't used;
> certainly my experience a couple of weeks ago with the two livecd images
> underlined the need for "something" since while an expert user might know
> what to do, the liveCD should be a showcase of what the distro can do for
> a new user, and if having a killer app -- such as in my case, OO.o -- is
> not practical, then "an easy" way, slash that, an obvious guide on how to
> install it for the newbie would be crucial.
>
>
>
>

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