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Old 09-16-2011, 01:24 PM
Markus Feldmann
 
Default damaged partition

Hi All,

since weeks i cant access the laptop from my girl-friend. This laptop
has a dual boot system (Windows and Debian Lenny). When i try to start
the Linux System he stops at a specific point, where he cant find some
devices under /dev/. Further i tried to boot a live-CD and mount the
Linux System manualy without success.

My partition-table is:
Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xb1c0b1c0

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 8032 64517008+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda2 8415 9728 10554705 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda3 8033 8414 3068415 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda5 * 8415 8420 48163+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda6 8421 8547 1020096 82 Linux swap
/ Solaris
/dev/sda7 8548 9728 9486351 83 Linux

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Here are some further tests:
<fsck /dev/sda7>
fsck from util-linux-ng 2.17.2
e2fsck 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)
/dev/sda7: clean, 232529/1186688 files, 2143683/2371587 blocks

<mount /dev/sda7 /mnt/sda7>
mount: Stale NFS file handle

<fsck -b 32768 /dev/sda7>
fsck from util-linux-ng 2.17.2
e2fsck 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)
fsck.ext2: Bad magic number in super-block while trying to open
/dev/sda7

The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2
filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock
is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate
superblock:
e2fsck -b 8193<device>

I tried all backup-superblocks without success.

<file -s /dev/sda7>
/dev/sda7: Linux rev 1.0 ext2 filesystem data,
UUID=96380d35-74fd-4c37-abc9-9dfc3d1bd43e

<blkid | grep sda7>
/dev/sda7: UUID="96380d35-74fd-4c37-abc9-9dfc3d1bd43e" TYPE="ext2"

<fsck.ext2 /dev/sda7>
e2fsck 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)
/dev/sda7: clean, 232529/1186688 files, 2143683/2371587 blocks

<mount -t ext2 -o ro /dev/sda7 /mnt/sda7>
mount: Stale NFS file handle

I only need the data under .thunderbird/, but i need to mount the ext
partition first? or not? Is there another way to get my data?

regards Markus


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Old 09-16-2011, 03:41 PM
Bodo Thiesen
 
Default damaged partition

* Markus Feldmann <feldmann_markus@gmx.de> hat geschrieben:

> <fsck /dev/sda7>
> fsck from util-linux-ng 2.17.2
> e2fsck 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)
> /dev/sda7: clean, 232529/1186688 files, 2143683/2371587 blocks

Hallo Markus

# e2fsck $dev

First tests, wether the file system state is »clean« and if, wether the
maximal mount count or maximal mount time has reched. It tests the file
system only, if it's state is not »clean« (on an ext2 with journal this
is usually never the case, because after journal replay the file system
will be clean) or any of the bothe maximal values has reached.

So, to test a file system which is marked clean, you have to force it:

# e2fsck -f $dev

BTW: And if you want some progress bar, add a -C 0:

# e2fsck -f -C 0 $dev

That's the command I usually run.

> <mount -t ext2 -o ro /dev/sda7 /mnt/sda7>
> mount: Stale NFS file handle

What's »dmesg | tail -n 20« saying immediatelly after running that command?

What's the result of »grep sda7 /proc/mounts«?
What's the result of »grep sda7 /etc/mtab«?

Liebe Grüße

Bodo

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Old 09-16-2011, 08:33 PM
Markus Feldmann
 
Default damaged partition

Am 16.09.2011 17:41, schrieb Bodo Thiesen:

So, to test a file system which is marked clean, you have to force it:

# e2fsck -f $dev


Hi Bodo,

here the Result of
<e2fsck -f /dev/sda7>
e2fsck 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)
Resize_inode not enabled, but the resize inode is non-zero.
Clear<y>? cancelled!



Should i go further? This will be overide some Bits. I am frightened.
Does this mean somebody tried to resize this partion without success?
Maybe I?


regards Markus

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Old 09-16-2011, 09:22 PM
Stephen Samuel
 
Default damaged partition

You're working with a damaged partition.. Probably the first thing to do would be to make a copy of the partition.
Get either a 16GB thumb drive, or an external drive that you can partition appropriately.. then make a copy of the damaged partition --* This may be a trial-and-error situation.


Once you have a good copy, then you can work on the copy.

If you get a laptop drive, then you can make multiple copies of the bad partition(s) overnight and then try different recovery paths until you get what you need.


If you only care about parts of the data, on the drive you can also try mounting readonly -- and see if the data you want is available for copying out without having to repair the entire partition.

mount -o ro /dev/sda7 /mnt/sda7


On Fri, Sep 16, 2011 at 1:33 PM, Markus Feldmann <feldmann_markus@gmx.de> wrote:

Am 16.09.2011 17:41, schrieb Bodo Thiesen:


So, to test a file system which is marked clean, you have to force it:



# e2fsck -f $dev




Hi Bodo,



here the Result of

<e2fsck -f /dev/sda7>

* *e2fsck 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)

* *Resize_inode not enabled, but the resize inode is non-zero. Clear<y>? cancelled!





Should i go further? This will be overide some Bits. I am frightened. Does this mean somebody tried to resize this partion without success? Maybe I?



regards Markus



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--
Stephen Samuel http://www.bcgreen.com* Software, like love,
778-861-7641* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * grows when you give it away


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Old 09-17-2011, 10:21 PM
Markus Feldmann
 
Default damaged partition

Am 16.09.2011 23:22, schrieb Stephen Samuel:

You're working with a damaged partition.. Probably the first thing to do
would be to make a copy of the partition.
Get either a 16GB thumb drive, or an external drive that you can
partition appropriately.. then make a copy of the damaged partition --
This may be a trial-and-error situation.

Once you have a good copy, then you can work on the copy.

If you get a laptop drive, then you can make multiple copies of the bad
partition(s) overnight and then try different recovery paths until you
get what you need.

If you only care about parts of the data, on the drive you can also try
mounting readonly -- and see if the data you want is available for
copying out without having to repair the entire partition.

mount -o ro /dev/sda7 /mnt/sda7

Hi,

i bought an external 1GB Harddisk and saved this damaged partition.
Furhter on i tried:

<e2fsck -f /mnt/AIRY-1TB/sda7.part>
http://pastebin.com/f1TRMNS2

The output is in german, sorry. However i dont know when i should to
press "yes", so i only pressed "y".


Then i started <testdisk /mnt/AIRY-1TB/sda7.part> and he found ".", ".."
and i copied "." to some place on my external disk. I could recover my
.thunderbird :-)


regards Markus

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