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Sean McCauliff 04-07-2011 11:08 PM

Resizing a file system that has been converted to ext4
 
Hello,

I have an ext3 file system of about 8TiB in size. At the rate data is
added to the file system it will fill up in a few months so I'm weighing
my options. One option would be to create a new ext4 file system and
copy everything over to a new, larger ext4 file system. Another option
would be to modify the software that uses this file system so it can use
multiple file systems. Finally, I could could convert the existing file
system to ext4 and then resize it. Is this advisable? Has anyone tried
this?


Thanks,
Sean McCauliff

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Eric Sandeen 04-07-2011 11:40 PM

Resizing a file system that has been converted to ext4
 
On 4/7/11 4:08 PM, Sean McCauliff wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have an ext3 file system of about 8TiB in size. At the rate data
> is added to the file system it will fill up in a few months so I'm
> weighing my options. One option would be to create a new ext4 file
> system and copy everything over to a new, larger ext4 file system.
> Another option would be to modify the software that uses this file
> system so it can use multiple file systems. Finally, I could could
> convert the existing file system to ext4 and then resize it. Is this
> advisable? Has anyone tried this?
>
> Thanks, Sean McCauliff

Hi Sean -

Modern ext3 should be have a 16T limit just as ext4 does, so converting to ext4 doesn't really change your max fs size.

However, a fresh ext4 filesystem should in theory be a bit more e2fsck-able at that scale and have the best feature-set.

I always recommend migration rather than conversion when possible; you'll get the best features and performance, and run the most tested codepaths that way.

-Eric

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Andreas Dilger 04-08-2011 02:21 AM

Resizing a file system that has been converted to ext4
 
I'm pretty sure that I have filesystems with mixed extent- and block-mapped files that I've resized in the past.

That said, depending on your data's importance, and your tolerance for risk you should probably have a backup of your data anyway. At that point, starting with a fresh ext4 filesystem and restoring from backup is also attractive for the performance improvements of extents, as well as other format-time only features.

My filesystems have a high turnover rate (PVR) and are not impossible to replace, so I have been resizing in place and letting normal turnover of files migrate to extents. I still don't have some if the newer filesystem features.

Cheers, Andreas

On 2011-04-07, at 5:08 PM, Sean McCauliff <Sean.D.McCauliff@nasa.gov> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I have an ext3 file system of about 8TiB in size. At the rate data is added to the file system it will fill up in a few months so I'm weighing my options. One option would be to create a new ext4 file system and copy everything over to a new, larger ext4 file system. Another option would be to modify the software that uses this file system so it can use multiple file systems. Finally, I could could convert the existing file system to ext4 and then resize it. Is this advisable? Has anyone tried this?
>
> Thanks,
> Sean McCauliff
>
> _______________________________________________
> Ext3-users mailing list
> Ext3-users@redhat.com
> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/ext3-users

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Ext3-users@redhat.com
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"Mccauliff, Sean D. (ARC-PX)[Lockheed Martin Space OPNS]" 04-08-2011 10:24 PM

Resizing a file system that has been converted to ext4
 
Thanks for all the responses this may change how I approach this issue!

Sean McCauliff
________________________________________
From: Andreas Dilger [adilger@dilger.ca]
Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2011 7:21 PM
To: Mccauliff, Sean D. (ARC-PX)[Lockheed Martin Space OPNS]
Cc: ext3-users@redhat.com
Subject: Re: Resizing a file system that has been converted to ext4

I'm pretty sure that I have filesystems with mixed extent- and block-mapped files that I've resized in the past.

That said, depending on your data's importance, and your tolerance for risk you should probably have a backup of your data anyway. At that point, starting with a fresh ext4 filesystem and restoring from backup is also attractive for the performance improvements of extents, as well as other format-time only features.

My filesystems have a high turnover rate (PVR) and are not impossible to replace, so I have been resizing in place and letting normal turnover of files migrate to extents. I still don't have some if the newer filesystem features.

Cheers, Andreas

On 2011-04-07, at 5:08 PM, Sean McCauliff <Sean.D.McCauliff@nasa.gov> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I have an ext3 file system of about 8TiB in size. At the rate data is added to the file system it will fill up in a few months so I'm weighing my options. One option would be to create a new ext4 file system and copy everything over to a new, larger ext4 file system. Another option would be to modify the software that uses this file system so it can use multiple file systems. Finally, I could could convert the existing file system to ext4 and then resize it. Is this advisable? Has anyone tried this?
>
> Thanks,
> Sean McCauliff
>
> _______________________________________________
> Ext3-users mailing list
> Ext3-users@redhat.com
> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/ext3-users

_______________________________________________
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Ext3-users@redhat.com
https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/ext3-users


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