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Old 05-30-2008, 03:27 PM
Osamu Aoki
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

On Fri, May 30, 2008 at 05:56:43AM +0530, L.V.Gandhi wrote:
> I have made a text file in Linux using echo and cat commands. When I
> open the file in note pad, I find files are not having line break, but
> having a character in place of line break. Is there any way in echo
> and cat commands usage to put windows line break?

I summarizes these tricks here:

http://people.debian.org/~osamu/pub/getwiki/html/ch12.en.html#eolconversion


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Old 05-30-2008, 03:49 PM
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

> Ron Johnson wrote:
>> On 05/29/08 19:35, Paul Johnson wrote:
>>
>>> On Thursday 29 May 2008 05:26:43 pm L.V.Gandhi wrote:
>>>
>>>> I have made a text file in Linux using echo and cat commands. When I
>>>> open the file in note pad, I find files are not having line break, but
>>>> having a character in place of line break. Is there any way in echo
>>>> and cat commands usage to put windows line break?
>>>>
>>> Windows happens to end lines in a way that's gratuitously different
>>> from the
>>> rest of the world. Check out the tofrodos package.
>>>
>>
>> Since 90% of all computers are DOS/Windows, and got that method from
>> CP/M, which did it that way back in 1976/77, your "gratuitously
>> different" comment is absurdly wrong.
>>
> Actually, it dates back further than that, to ASR33 teletype machines,
> where you needed to issue separate carriage return and line feed
> characters to end a line - to i) physically return the carriage to the
> beginning of the line, and ii) feed a line of paper (turn the platten).
> (Anybody else out there old enough to remember when ASR33s where THE
> standard i/o device? :-)
>
> CR+LF is also required in most Internet protocols.
>
> This is one of the surprising areas, where the Microsoft products get
> things right, and the Unix world messes up.
>
> There are some good historical references at:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newline
> http://www.rfc-editor.org/EOLstory.txt
> http://www.w3.org/TR/newline
>
> Miles Fidelman

I also remember when one had to put two STOP bits at the end of each ASCII
character transmitted to allow the print ball time to return to its
resting position in advance of the next character
Larry Owens
>
>
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Old 05-31-2008, 12:27 AM
L.V.Gandhi
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

On Fri, May 30, 2008 at 8:57 PM, Osamu Aoki <osamu@debian.org> wrote:
> On Fri, May 30, 2008 at 05:56:43AM +0530, L.V.Gandhi wrote:
>> I have made a text file in Linux using echo and cat commands. When I
>> open the file in note pad, I find files are not having line break, but
>> having a character in place of line break. Is there any way in echo
>> and cat commands usage to put windows line break?
>
> I summarizes these tricks here:
>
> http://people.debian.org/~osamu/pub/getwiki/html/ch12.en.html#eolconversion
>

Thank you very much.

--
L.V.Gandhi
http://lvgandhi.tripod.com/
linux user No.205042


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Old 05-31-2008, 02:10 AM
"Douglas A. Tutty"
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

On Fri, May 30, 2008 at 12:35:41AM -0500, Russell L. Harris wrote:
> * Miles Fidelman <mfidelman@meetinghouse.net> [080529 23:28]:

> Back about 1967, the ASR33 was coveted by those of us whose only means
> of input and output was the 80-column punch card.
>
> "Output?", you say? Yes. For printed output, you put the deck of
> output cards into the card hopper of the line printer -- the chassis
> of which was a cube about four feet on a side. But inasmuch as the
> printer broke down on a daily basis, you quickly learned to read the
> holes in the cards.
>
> I speak of the days of Fortran-II running on an IBM 1620. Back then,
> it often was necessary to load the compiler (another deck of punched
> cards) before loading the application.
>

And with such computers, we went to the moon. I mean we generically: I
was a year old in 1967. However, I remember in high-school having
multiple-choice exams where we had to code punch cards with a 4B pencil.

By the time I needed to learn fortran, it was chaper to buy a new IBM
PS/2-70-A21 386 with 4 MB ram, OS/2, and Fortran than it was to buy the
computer time from the university; just barely. When I also had to do
AutoCad it was defintely cheaper even after buying AutoCad.

Of course, I'm typing this on my VT520.

Doug.


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Old 05-31-2008, 02:17 AM
"Douglas A. Tutty"
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

On Fri, May 30, 2008 at 06:54:42PM +1000, Adrian Levi wrote:
> 2008/5/30 Russell L. Harris :
> > I speak of the days of Fortran-II running on an IBM 1620. Back then,
> > it often was necessary to load the compiler (another deck of punched
> > cards) before loading the application.
>
> It must have been fun to watch someone play pickup 500 and put them
> all back in order again.

IIRC, each card had a sequence number. I don't know if they had
card-sorter machines.

That was the thing, every function to apply to a set of cards was a
different machine.

However, I'm of the opinion firmly that the lessons and skills learned
in those times which became the mainframe culture gives rise to a
different type of sysadmin than unix does. Even in the same company.
I've known IBM people and the AIX types are fundamentally different than
the (now) Z/OS types. Unfortunaly, I haven't collected enough quarters
[1] from them to join the ranks.

Doug.

[1] from the famous joke "here's a quarter kid, go buy yourself a real
computer".



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Old 05-31-2008, 02:25 AM
"Douglas A. Tutty"
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

On Fri, May 30, 2008 at 08:49:07AM -0700, owens@peak.org wrote:

> I also remember when one had to put two STOP bits at the end of each ASCII
> character transmitted to allow the print ball time to return to its
> resting position in advance of the next character
> Larry Owens
> >

Yeah, and it only took 5 bits per character (baudot) instead of 7 for ASCII or
now however-many for unicode. Progress. I wonder which would take less
room on disk: 1000 emails in baudot or in ascii after gziping?

Doug.


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Old 05-31-2008, 03:22 AM
John Hasler
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

Doug writes:
> IIRC, each card had a sequence number. I don't know if they had
> card-sorter machines.

Yes, of course we had sorters. Card sorting machines are much older than
computers: it's what punch cards were invented for. Ask Wikipedia to tell
you about Herman Hollerith. Don't you kids study history?
--
John Hasler


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Old 05-31-2008, 03:23 AM
John Hasler
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

Larry Owens wrote:
> I also remember when one had to put two STOP bits at the end of each ASCII
> character transmitted to allow the print ball time to return to its
> resting position in advance of the next character

That's not the reason for using two stop bits.
--
John Hasler


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Old 05-31-2008, 09:02 AM
Jabka Atu
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

Miles Fidelman wrote:
> Ron Johnson wrote:
>> On 05/29/08 19:35, Paul Johnson wrote:
>>
>>> On Thursday 29 May 2008 05:26:43 pm L.V.Gandhi wrote:
>>>
>>>> I have made a text file in Linux using echo and cat commands. When I
>>>> open the file in note pad, I find files are not having line break, but
>>>> having a character in place of line break. Is there any way in echo
>>>> and cat commands usage to put windows line break?
>>>>
>>> Windows happens to end lines in a way that's gratuitously different
>>> from the rest of the world. Check out the tofrodos package.
>>>
>>
>> Since 90% of all computers are DOS/Windows, and got that method from
>> CP/M, which did it that way back in 1976/77, your "gratuitously
>> different" comment is absurdly wrong.
>>
> Actually, it dates back further than that, to ASR33 teletype machines,
> where you needed to issue separate carriage return and line feed
> characters to end a line - to i) physically return the carriage to the
> beginning of the line, and ii) feed a line of paper (turn the
> platten). (Anybody else out there old enough to remember when ASR33s
> where THE standard i/o device? :-)
>
> CR+LF is also required in most Internet protocols.
> This is one of the surprising areas, where the Microsoft products get
> things right, and the Unix world messes up.
>
> There are some good historical references at:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newline
> http://www.rfc-editor.org/EOLstory.txt
> http://www.w3.org/TR/newline
>
> Miles Fidelman
>
>
maybe someone allready answerd but ...
unix default line brake is ASCII 10 and windows is 13.

You can use unix2dos or tofrodos to change it.

--
--
Could you at least use man ?
Jabka Atu (aka mha13/Mashrom Head) || bsh83.blogspot.com
--


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Old 05-31-2008, 11:02 AM
Miles Fidelman
 
Default text file from Linux to windows.

John Hasler wrote:

Doug writes:


IIRC, each card had a sequence number. I don't know if they had
card-sorter machines.



Yes, of course we had sorters. Card sorting machines are much older than
computers: it's what punch cards were invented for. Ask Wikipedia to tell
you about Herman Hollerith. Don't you kids study history?


or this one: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punched_card

now for extra credit: which came first, the punched card or paper tape?
(hint: search on Jacquard Loom and Basile Bouchon)



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