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Old 05-22-2008, 05:13 PM
Steve Witt
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, 22 May 2008, andy wrote:


Hello

My / partition is some 12GB and I see that it is currently 97% full. How can
I clean this out without trashing important files? What should I be looking
for in terms of likely culprits that can be deep-sixed safely?




We'll need to know a little more about you machine's total partitioning
scheme. Where is /home and /var? These are the partitions that tend to
have storage of variable files in them and may need to have their own
paritition (depending upon the machine's use).







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Old 05-22-2008, 05:17 PM
Patrick Draper
 
Default 97% use of / system

andy wrote:

Hello

My / partition is some 12GB and I see that it is currently 97% full.
How can I clean this out without trashing important files? What should
I be looking for in terms of likely culprits that can be deep-sixed
safely?


Thanks

Andy



Run a du -Sx | sort -n | less to see what directory is holding the most
stuff. That reports directories separately, without subdirectory totals
included. The biggest ones are at the bottom.


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Old 05-22-2008, 05:17 PM
"Marcos Toro Oyarzo"
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 12:56 PM, andy <geek_show@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> Hello
>
> My / partition is some 12GB and I see that it is currently 97% full. How can
> I clean this out without trashing important files? What should I be looking
> for in terms of likely culprits that can be deep-sixed safely?
>
> Thanks
>
> Andy
>
> --
>
> "If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry
> about the answers." - Thomas Pynchon, "Gravity's Rainbow"
>
>
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>
>

try with this:

# apt-get clean

and then verify the free space with: df -h

cheers,

--
"Content precedes design. Design in the absence of content is not
design, it's decoration."
-- Jeffrey Zeldman


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Old 05-22-2008, 05:43 PM
Luke S Crawford
 
Default 97% use of / system

andy <geek_show@dsl.pipex.com> writes:
> My / partition is some 12GB and I see that it is currently 97%
> full. How can I clean this out without trashing important files? What
> should I be looking for in terms of likely culprits that can be
> deep-sixed safely?

cd /
du -h -s *

then drill down to the big directories and repeat.

If it's a server, pay special attention to /var/log but 12Gb is a lot of
logs, and it sounds like you are a desktop user, in which case the space is
probably movies or something in a home directory.


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Old 05-22-2008, 06:21 PM
"Steve Lamb"
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, May 22, 2008 10:16 am, Sam Leon wrote:
> andy wrote:
> Trying running "aptitude clean"

"aptitude autoclean" is a better suggestion. Clean removes all cached
deb files. Autoclean removes all old cached deb files while retaining
the most current cached files in case they're needed. Suggesting clean
might remove files they will need while suggesting will leave them with
those files while removing the files they most likely will not need.

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Old 05-22-2008, 09:17 PM
"Javier Barroso"
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 6:56 PM, andy <geek_show@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

Hello



My / partition is some 12GB and I see that it is currently 97% full. How can I clean this out without trashing important files? What should I be looking for in terms of likely culprits that can be deep-sixed safely?
If you are running a desktop computer, you could probe baobab program
 
Old 05-22-2008, 11:05 PM
Dave Sherohman
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 11:21:15AM -0700, Steve Lamb wrote:
> On Thu, May 22, 2008 10:16 am, Sam Leon wrote:
> > andy wrote:
> > Trying running "aptitude clean"
>
> "aptitude autoclean" is a better suggestion. Clean removes all cached
> deb files. Autoclean removes all old cached deb files while retaining
> the most current cached files in case they're needed. Suggesting clean
> might remove files they will need while suggesting will leave them with
> those files while removing the files they most likely will not need.

While that is accurate as far as it goes... How likely is the average
user to ever need the cached debs?

Personally, I've been running Debian continuously for nearly a decade
(that long already? sheesh...) and I have never had use for a cached
deb for anything except:

1) Installing to a second machine without redownloading (although,
really, I've been far more likely to just redownload on the second
machine)

2) Noticing that I messed up an option during the package install and
deciding to uninstall/reinstall rather than fixing the initial install

I also seem to recall seeing a thread recently which asked what the
cached debs are good for. Nobody suggested anything that didn't fall
into those two catgories.

Realistically, if you're not going to install to additional machines and
it's been more than a day or two since you installed a package (to
provide time to notice any install/configuration problems), the odds of
needing the deb again are pretty much nil. Using "clean" instead of
"autoclean" will be fine in the large majority of cases.

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Old 05-22-2008, 11:48 PM
Celejar
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, 22 May 2008 18:05:42 -0500
Dave Sherohman <dave@sherohman.org> wrote:

...

> Personally, I've been running Debian continuously for nearly a decade
> (that long already? sheesh...) and I have never had use for a cached
> deb for anything except:

...

> 2) Noticing that I messed up an option during the package install and
> deciding to uninstall/reinstall rather than fixing the initial install

Why not just dpkg-reconfigure, with the same priority used by the
installer? You'll get asked the same questions that you would get
asked in a reinstall.

Celejar
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Old 05-23-2008, 01:21 AM
"Sridhar M.A."
 
Default 97% use of / system

On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 06:05:42PM -0500, Dave Sherohman wrote:
>
> Realistically, if you're not going to install to additional machines and
> it's been more than a day or two since you installed a package (to
> provide time to notice any install/configuration problems), the odds of
> needing the deb again are pretty much nil. Using "clean" instead of
> "autoclean" will be fine in the large majority of cases.
>
For those cases where you need to install debs on machines which are
not connected to the net or have slow connection/limited bandwidth,
dpkg-repack is your friend.

I use it regularly and it is a whole lot easier than downloading
packages again.

Regards,

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Felson's Law:
To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism; to steal from
many is research.
 
Old 05-23-2008, 01:50 AM
Steve Lamb
 
Default 97% use of / system

Dave Sherohman wrote:
> While that is accurate as far as it goes... How likely is the average
> user to ever need the cached debs?

[ snippage ]

> Realistically, if you're not going to install to additional machines and
> it's been more than a day or two since you installed a package (to
> provide time to notice any install/configuration problems), the odds of
> needing the deb again are pretty much nil. Using "clean" instead of
> "autoclean" will be fine in the large majority of cases.

Y'know, I had a long reply here basically arguing one against the other,
one being safer than the other. Then I decided to test the theory on my own
machines since I had not done autoclean/clean in a while...

{grey@mania:~} du -sh /var/cache/apt/archives
732M /var/cache/apt/archives
root@mania:~# aptitude autoclean
Freed 0B of disk space

root@teleute:~# du -sh /var/cache/apt/archives
740M /var/cache/apt/archives
root@teleute:~# aptitude autoclean
Freed 0B of disk space

{grey@olethros:~} du -sh /var/cache/apt/archives
root@olethros:~# aptitude autoclean
Freed 0B of disk space
root@olethros:~#

Apparently cron.daily/apt is firing off autoclean by default as it is
because I haven't done it in quite a few days. Which means offering autoclean
as a first step is kinda pointless and nets nothing. Go fig. Carry on.

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PGP Key: 1FC01004 | And dream I do...
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