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Old 07-14-2010, 04:59 AM
Nils Kassube
 
Default file permissions

Gryllida wrote:
> The issue is that the new files that I create do not have the other
> Windows users of that machine on permissions list.
> As far as I got, these lines do not do anything about users different
> from me.

I think you got it right. If you change file permissions to 777,
everybody may read / write / execute those files IF it is a Unix (Linux)
environment. But what everybody seems to be missing is that you are
talking about Windows permissions on a Windows share which has nothing
to do with Unix permissions. Therefore the suggested chmod command isn't
very useful in your case.

> Probably I don't understand something, if so please explain
> - and how do I allow the other Windows users to edit the files I
> create on that shared location?

Sorry, I can't help you there - I don't use Windows shares. Isn't there
someone who knows how Windows permissions work with CIFS / SAMBA (not
sure which one is used here)?


Nils

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Old 07-14-2010, 05:02 PM
Martin Webster
 
Default file permissions

On Wed, 2010-07-14 at 06:59 +0200, Nils Kassube wrote:

> Gryllida wrote:

> > The issue is that the new files that I create do not have the other
> > Windows users of that machine on permissions list.
> > As far as I got, these lines do not do anything about users
> > different from me.

> I think you got it right. If you change file permissions to 777,
> everybody may read / write / execute those files IF it is a Unix
> (Linux) environment. But what everybody seems to be missing is that
> you are talking about Windows permissions on a Windows share which has
> nothing to do with Unix permissions. Therefore the suggested chmod
> command isn't very useful in your case.
>
> > Probably I don't understand something, if so please explain - and
> > how do I allow the other Windows users to edit the files I create on
> > that shared location?
>
> Sorry, I can't help you there - I don't use Windows shares. Isn't
> there someone who knows how Windows permissions work with CIFS / SAMBA
> (not sure which one is used here)?

SAMBA allows you to interact with Windows file and print services.
Consequently, you shouldn't have to change "Windows" file permissions
using chmod. Indeed, permission are controlled through SAMBA.

I've set-up my daughter's laptop (which runs Vista) to emulate your
scenario. I created a new file from my Ubuntu 10.04 netbook and then
successfully deleted it from the other machine. I conclude that your
SAMBA set-up needs checking/ tweaking.

It would be helpful if you explain how you connect to the remote
computer. Do you browse using Nautilus or mount the networked folder on
your local file system? How did you authenticate to the remote folder,
i.e. workgroup, id etc?

--
As ever,
.artin

Martin Webster • Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/martinwebster
AOL: martinjwebster • Wordpress: http://martinwebster.info/
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Old 07-14-2010, 07:02 PM
chris
 
Default file permissions

On Wed, 2010-07-14 at 06:59 +0200, Nils Kassube wrote:
> Gryllida wrote:
> > The issue is that the new files that I create do not have the other
> > Windows users of that machine on permissions list.
> > As far as I got, these lines do not do anything about users different
> > from me.
>
> I think you got it right. If you change file permissions to 777,
> everybody may read / write / execute those files IF it is a Unix (Linux)
> environment. But what everybody seems to be missing is that you are
> talking about Windows permissions on a Windows share which has nothing
> to do with Unix permissions. Therefore the suggested chmod command isn't
> very useful in your case.
>
> > Probably I don't understand something, if so please explain
> > - and how do I allow the other Windows users to edit the files I
> > create on that shared location?
The file on the windows partition need to be archive. It sounds as if
they are read only which will prevent them being written to.

you would need to access them from windows, and using explorer or
similar change the attribute to archive.

cheers the kiwi


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Old 03-10-2012, 05:45 PM
Robert Spangler
 
Default File permissions

Hello,

I need to know if there is something I am missing about file permission as I
believe I am seeing some strange stuff on my system. I have a directory as
follows:

drwxrwxrwx 7 root root 4096 Mar 10 13:35 temp

In this directory I have a file:

-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 137 Oct 30 02:16 208-109-248-33test

As a normal user should I be able to rename this file? I believe that only
root should be able to modify this file but as a normal user I am able to
rename it without elevated privileges as so:

temp $ mv 208-109-248-33test 208-109-248-33-mv

[Sat Mar 10 13:41:05] /temp

temp $ lt 208*
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 137 Oct 30 02:16 208-109-248-33-mv

How is this possible? If it is possible what am I missing or not
understanding? Thnx.


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Robert

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Old 03-10-2012, 05:52 PM
Lamar Owen
 
Default File permissions

On Saturday, March 10, 2012 01:45:19 PM Robert Spangler wrote:
> drwxrwxrwx 7 root root 4096 Mar 10 13:35 temp
...
> temp $ lt 208*
> -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 137 Oct 30 02:16 208-109-248-33-mv
>
> How is this possible? If it is possible what am I missing or not
> understanding? Thnx.

You have write permissions to the directory; renaming a file needs write on the directory, not on the file.
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Old 03-10-2012, 07:09 PM
Woodchuck
 
Default File permissions

On Sat, Mar 10, 2012 at 01:45:19PM -0500, Robert Spangler wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I need to know if there is something I am missing about file permission as I
> believe I am seeing some strange stuff on my system. I have a directory as
> follows:
>
> drwxrwxrwx 7 root root 4096 Mar 10 13:35 temp
>
> In this directory I have a file:
>
> -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 137 Oct 30 02:16 208-109-248-33test
>
> As a normal user should I be able to rename this file? I believe that only
> root should be able to modify this file but as a normal user I am able to
> rename it without elevated privileges as so:
>
> temp $ mv 208-109-248-33test 208-109-248-33-mv
>
> [Sat Mar 10 13:41:05] /temp
>
> temp $ lt 208*
> -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 137 Oct 30 02:16 208-109-248-33-mv
>
> How is this possible? If it is possible what am I missing or not
> understanding? Thnx.

As Mr Owen remarks, nothing is broken. To get the mode ("permissions")
semantics that you might be expecting, set the "sticky bit" of the
directory.

<root> # chmod +t temp

Then the mode will appear as "drwxrwxrwt" ( 1777 in octal).

Notice that this is the same as the mode for /tmp.

"In Unix, everything is a file." Directories are files, too.

Dave
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Old 03-10-2012, 10:48 PM
"Les Bell"
 
Default File permissions

Robert Spangler <mlists@zoominternet.net> wrote:

>>
How is this possible? If it is possible what am I missing or not
understanding? Thnx.
<<

Lamar Owen nailed it in his post: renaming a file means updating its
directory entry and hence requires write permission on the directory, not
the file - which you have as a result of the "other" permissions on the
directory:

drwxrwxrwx 7 root root 4096 Mar 10 13:35 temp

If you want the full story, I have an article on my web site (part of a
magazine series I wrote, years ago) which explains permissions in detail:

http://www.lesbell.com.au/Home.nsf/web/Controlling+Access+to+Files?OpenDocument

(Other articles are at http://www.lesbell.com.au/Home.nsf/Linux?OpenView)

Best,

--- Les Bell
[http://www.lesbell.com.au]
Tel: +61 2 9451 1144


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Old 03-11-2012, 01:48 PM
Robert Spangler
 
Default File permissions

On Saturday 10 March 2012 13:45, the following was written:

Thnx everyone. I was under the impression that even though you had access to
the directory you still could not touch a file that you were not part of the
owner or group unless the bits were set.


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Regards
Robert

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Old 03-11-2012, 03:12 PM
Les Mikesell
 
Default File permissions

On Sun, Mar 11, 2012 at 9:48 AM, Robert Spangler
<mlists@zoominternet.net> wrote:
> On Saturday 10 March 2012 13:45, the following was written:
>
> Thnx everyone. *I was under the impression that even though you had access to
> the directory you still could not touch a file that you were not part of the
> owner or group unless the bits were set.

You can't affect the contents of the file, but the name is a directory
entry which is a separate thing. Note that with hard links you can
have multiple names that might be in different directories pointing to
the same contents.

--
Les Mikesell
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