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Old 10-12-2012, 03:30 PM
"Stephen P. Molnar"
 
Default Several Installation Problems

I have just converted my 64 bit Linux computer to Debian 6.0.5/KDE 4.4.5
(retaining the Gnome desktop) and have several problems with which I
really need help. Although i have been using Linux since about 1993, I
am neither a software nor hardware person, but rather a user. Hence, I
would ask the readers forbearance.


I had been using openSUSE for quite a few years, but the v 12 series
don't support some of my major computational chemistry software.


I had successfully installed Debian on a separate HD from my openSUSE
installation and the first problem involves the grub menu.list (which no
longer exists in grub-pc which is used by Debian). The distributions
currently in the splash screen are:


openSUSE (this is 12.2 resulting from an upgrade of 12.1)
Advance options for openSUSE
openSUSE 12.1 (x86_64)
Advance options for openSUSE 12.1 (86_64)
Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.5)
Advanced options for Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.5)
Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.4)
Advanced options for Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.4)

Now for some reason, even though, I used the Debian 6.0.6 iso DVD for
the reinstallation of 6.0.5, because of a very stupid attempt on my part
to change the video drivers to nVidia which resulted in a degradation of
the monitor resolution and the introduction of a really ugly font).
Trial and error showed me that I want to boot into the 6.0.4 version
(where that version number came from I don't have the faintest clue) to
get the new installation which has the resolution and font that I want.
Of course the default is the first entry in the menu list. So, the
first question is (finally) how do I change the default order of booting
to the one that I want?


Next problem. After I selected the primary master HD for the new
installation, the installer only found the one HD and ignored the others
on the system. The default fstab is:


# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
# / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=c9ff872d-eec5-46ad-824c-fc6d3de57494 / ext3
errors=remount-ro 0 1

# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=812fdf37-0af0-4b52-8bc2-7e58135fd801 none swap
sw 0 0

/dev/scd0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
/dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

However, according to fdisk -l I have:


Disk /dev/sda: 120.0 GB, 120034123776 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14593 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0008c38c

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 13997 112429056 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 13998 14594 4789249 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 13998 14594 4789248 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sdb: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 77545 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 77545 39082648+ 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdc: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0000c04d

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 * 1 1947 15630336 83 Linux
/dev/sdc2 1947 4866 23450624 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdd: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x000b733b

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 * 1 29649 238152704 83 Linux
/dev/sdd2 29649 30402 6043649 5 Extended
/dev/sdd5 29649 30402 6043648 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sde: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0003d403

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sde1 1 2611 20972826 83 Linux
/dev/sde2 2612 60801 467411175 83 Linux

Now, if I hadn't been gun shy before about modifying the OS before, I
certainly am now.


My second question is that I would like comments about how I think
(dangerous that) I should edit fstab:


The entries that are already there I would leave alone. I did check and
there are entries in /dev for the other partitions on the HD's


/dev/sdb1 /sdb1 ext3 defaults 0 2
/dev/sdc1 /sdc1 ext4 defaults 0 2
/dev/sdc2 /sdc2 ext4 defaults 0 2
/dev/sdd1 /sdd1 reiserfs defaults 0 2
/dev/sdd2 /sdd2 reiserfs defaults 0 2
/dev/sdd5 /sdd5 reiserfs defaults 0 2
/dev/sde1 /sde1 ext4 defaults 0 2
/dev/sde2 /sde2 ext4 defaults 0 2

I'm particularly not sure about the last two entries on each of the new
lines.


With apologies for my long windiness, I will appreciate the help that
I'm sure that I'll be receiving.


Thanks in advance.

--
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D. Life is a fuzzy set
Foundation for Chemistry Stochastic and multivariate
www.FoundationForChemistry.com
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1


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Archive: 50783789.8090104@sbcglobal.net">http://lists.debian.org/50783789.8090104@sbcglobal.net
 
Old 10-12-2012, 04:15 PM
Darac Marjal
 
Default Several Installation Problems

On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 11:30:17AM -0400, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
> I have just converted my 64 bit Linux computer to Debian 6.0.5/KDE
> 4.4.5 (retaining the Gnome desktop) and have several problems with
> which I really need help. Although i have been using Linux since
> about 1993, I am neither a software nor hardware person, but rather
> a user. Hence, I would ask the readers forbearance.

Not a problem. Many people who use Debian do so because they want to be
able to fiddle about with it, but it'd not be a Universal Operating
System if it didn't cater for those who just want to get going and just
USE it.

>
> I had been using openSUSE for quite a few years, but the v 12 series
> don't support some of my major computational chemistry software.
>
> I had successfully installed Debian on a separate HD from my
> openSUSE installation and the first problem involves the grub
> menu.list (which no longer exists in grub-pc which is used by
> Debian). The distributions currently in the splash screen are:
>
> openSUSE (this is 12.2 resulting from an upgrade of 12.1)
> Advance options for openSUSE
> openSUSE 12.1 (x86_64)
> Advance options for openSUSE 12.1 (86_64)
> Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.5)
> Advanced options for Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.5)
> Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.4)
> Advanced options for Debian/GNU/Linux (6.0.4)
>
> Now for some reason, even though, I used the Debian 6.0.6 iso DVD
> for the reinstallation of 6.0.5, because of a very stupid attempt on
> my part to change the video drivers to nVidia which resulted in a
> degradation of the monitor resolution and the introduction of a
> really ugly font). Trial and error showed me that I want to boot
> into the 6.0.4 version (where that version number came from I don't
> have the faintest clue) to get the new installation which has the
> resolution and font that I want. Of course the default is the first
> entry in the menu list. So, the first question is (finally) how do
> I change the default order of booting to the one that I want?

Grub2 uses a more complicated configuration than Grub1 did. So much so,
that it's no longer recommended to modify that directly yourself any
more. Instead, the file (grub.cfg) is generated by invoking
"update-grub" which will read: /etc/default/grub (for general
configuration parameters), /etc/grub.d/* (for generating the various
menu entries) and the output of the "os-prober" command (for discovering
other operating systems on your system).

I'm also not sure why you have entries for Debian 6.0.5 and Debian 6.0.4
in your menu, if you have only one Debian install, but it might be
os-prober being over-eager in its detection. If you can live with a
little clutter, the extra entry does you no harm.

Changing the ORDER of booting in Grub2 is difficult, but can be done if
you need it. As an alternative, though, I can offer the ability to
change which menu entry is the default? For that, look in
/etc/default/grub. Change the "GRUB_DEFAULT" entry to the number of the
entry you want to boot by default (bearing in mind that counting starts
from zero).

>
> Next problem. After I selected the primary master HD for the new
> installation, the installer only found the one HD and ignored the
> others on the system. The default fstab is:
>
[cut]
>
> Now, if I hadn't been gun shy before about modifying the OS before,
> I certainly am now.
>
> My second question is that I would like comments about how I think
> (dangerous that) I should edit fstab:
>
> The entries that are already there I would leave alone. I did check
> and there are entries in /dev for the other partitions on the HD's
>
> /dev/sdb1 /sdb1 ext3 defaults 0 2
> /dev/sdc1 /sdc1 ext4 defaults 0 2
> /dev/sdc2 /sdc2 ext4 defaults 0 2
> /dev/sdd1 /sdd1 reiserfs defaults 0 2
> /dev/sdd2 /sdd2 reiserfs defaults 0 2
> /dev/sdd5 /sdd5 reiserfs defaults 0 2
> /dev/sde1 /sde1 ext4 defaults 0 2
> /dev/sde2 /sde2 ext4 defaults 0 2
>
> I'm particularly not sure about the last two entries on each of the
> new lines.

They all look fine to me, assuming that you're happy with the naming of
those mount points. You might want to create, say /opensuse-root,
/opensuse-usr or whatever to make it easier to find things.

You might also want to consider "defaults,noauto" or "defaults,ro" as a
safety measure, if these have other operating systems installed on them.
But it does depend on what you plan to do with them.

>
> With apologies for my long windiness, I will appreciate the help
> that I'm sure that I'll be receiving.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
 

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