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Old 10-09-2012, 10:41 PM
Wally Lepore
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

Hi Debian users.

I have downloaded the netinst iso file and verified the file using
MD5SUM and it passed. I burned the netinst iso image to a CD
successfully, booted to the CD and I am currently installing Debian
Squeeze. I will be installing debian to its own hard disk in a dual
boot set-up.

I have an 80 gig Western Digital Hard disk with Windows installed. The
windows disk has been backed up and the jumper is set as 'Master'. I
am not installing or changing anything on this 'windows' disk. I will
install Debian squeeze 'netinst' to a separate 80 gig Western Digital
Hard disk. The jumper is set as 'Slave'. Both disks are on the same
ribbon cable and plugged into the primary IDE slot on my motherboard.

I am at the critical point in the installation process known as the
partition set-up. I have chosen 'manual' set-up for the partitions and
have arrived at the part where its asking me to partition the 2nd hard
disk (sdb). I have not advanced through this section therefore I do
not know what questions will arrive next. I don't want to mess this
up. I will be installing debian-squeeze to its own hard disk (sdb) in
a dual boot set-up.

An interesting side note: Both identical drives are 'Enhanced IDE'
drives (EIDE). However for some reason during the debian set-up, the
installer identified them as SCSI drives and labeled them as follows

SCSI1 (0,0,0) (sda) -80.0 GB ATA WDC [serial number]
SCSI1 (0,1,0) (sdb) -80.0 GB ATA WDC [serial number]

Question #1 please:
Is this SCSI labeling something I can ignore? I continued on and moved
forward to the partition section (where I'm at now) with no issues.

I am primarily utilizing the set-up instructions for debian squeeze here:
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/

and currently reading:
Section 6.3.3. titled, 'Partitioning and Mount Point Selection'
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/ch06s03.html.en

I will also be utilizing this set-up for dual boot utilizing two
separate hard disks:
page 1: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23/dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7-on-a-computer-with-2-hard-drives/
page 2: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23/dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7-on-a-computer-with-2-hard-drives/2/

I will install the /boot directory to the 2nd hard disk (sdb). Doing
so, will allow me to view a menu at start-up asking which operating
system I want to boot (Windows or Debian). This will be accomplished
by changing the boot order in my BIOS to boot the 2nd hard disk (sdb).
I already tested this procedure using two hard disks each with windows
installed. With the boot order (in BIOS) changed as previously
described, I successfully booted to the 2nd hard disk (sdb). This 2nd
hard disk (sdb) is set to 'slave' on the same 40 pin ribbon cable as
the 1st hard disk (sda).

My partition scheme (that I have not set-up yet and based somewhat on
the above link) will be as follows:

1st Partition -- Boot Partition
/boot -- Type: Primary -- 500MB -- Ext4 journaling file system --
Location: Beginning

Second Partition -- Root Partition
/ -- Type: Logical -- 15000MB -- Ext4 journaling file system
-- Location: Beginning

3rd Partition -- Home Partition
/home -- Type: Logical -- 60000MB -- Ext4 journaling file system --
Location: Beginning

SWAP Area
Swap -- Type: Logical -- 2000MB -- Ext4 journaling file system --
Location: Beginning

Question #2 please:
Is this an acceptable partition set-up? Based on a disk capacity of 80
gigs, are the allotted partition sizes acceptable? Any suggestions
please ?

I am also 'meticulously' reading the debian install instructions as
well and Debian mentions other available directories such as:
dev, lib, opt, var, usr, sys --- etc. Please see the list of
additional directories:
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs02.html.en

Question #3 please:
I am not sure if I need to include 'any' of these additional
directories (listed above) in my partition scheme. I am also studying
the following programming languages: 'C' then C++ and Object 'C' and
would like to know if I need to include any additional
directories/partitions (from the list above) for my 'programming'
needs.

System specs:

iWill DVD266R motherboard
'Dual' Pentium III cpu's (1 GHz each) Total: 2 GHz
1 gig DDR memory
CD-R/RW
DVD - R/RW

Thank you very much
wally


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Old 10-09-2012, 10:53 PM
Wally Lepore
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 6:41 PM, Wally Lepore <wallylepore@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I have downloaded the netinst iso file and verified the file using
> MD5SUM and it passed.

I forgot to add this additional information. I am installing Debian
netinst file titled: debian-6.0.6-i386-netinst.iso (32 bit)

> System specs:
>
>W iWill DVD266R motherboard
> 'Dual' Pentium III cpu's (1 GHz each) Total: 2 GHz
> 1 gig DDR memory
> CD-R/RW
> DVD - R/R

Also, amended system specs:

W iWill DVD266R motherboard
'Dual' Pentium III cpu's (1 GHz each) Total: 2 GHz
1 gig DDR memory
CD-R/RW
DVD - R/R
USB - 2 ports

Thank you


On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 6:41 PM, Wally Lepore <wallylepore@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Debian users.
>
> I have downloaded the netinst iso file and verified the file using
> MD5SUM and it passed. I burned the netinst iso image to a CD
> successfully, booted to the CD and I am currently installing Debian
> Squeeze. I will be installing debian to its own hard disk in a dual
> boot set-up.
>
> I have an 80 gig Western Digital Hard disk with Windows installed. The
> windows disk has been backed up and the jumper is set as 'Master'. I
> am not installing or changing anything on this 'windows' disk. I will
> install Debian squeeze 'netinst' to a separate 80 gig Western Digital
> Hard disk. The jumper is set as 'Slave'. Both disks are on the same
> ribbon cable and plugged into the primary IDE slot on my motherboard.
>
> I am at the critical point in the installation process known as the
> partition set-up. I have chosen 'manual' set-up for the partitions and
> have arrived at the part where its asking me to partition the 2nd hard
> disk (sdb). I have not advanced through this section therefore I do
> not know what questions will arrive next. I don't want to mess this
> up. I will be installing debian-squeeze to its own hard disk (sdb) in
> a dual boot set-up.
>
> An interesting side note: Both identical drives are 'Enhanced IDE'
> drives (EIDE). However for some reason during the debian set-up, the
> installer identified them as SCSI drives and labeled them as follows
>
> SCSI1 (0,0,0) (sda) -80.0 GB ATA WDC [serial number]
> SCSI1 (0,1,0) (sdb) -80.0 GB ATA WDC [serial number]
>
> Question #1 please:
> Is this SCSI labeling something I can ignore? I continued on and moved
> forward to the partition section (where I'm at now) with no issues.
>
> I am primarily utilizing the set-up instructions for debian squeeze here:
> http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/
>
> and currently reading:
> Section 6.3.3. titled, 'Partitioning and Mount Point Selection'
> http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/ch06s03.html.en
>
> I will also be utilizing this set-up for dual boot utilizing two
> separate hard disks:
> page 1: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23/dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7-on-a-computer-with-2-hard-drives/
> page 2: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23/dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7-on-a-computer-with-2-hard-drives/2/
>
> I will install the /boot directory to the 2nd hard disk (sdb). Doing
> so, will allow me to view a menu at start-up asking which operating
> system I want to boot (Windows or Debian). This will be accomplished
> by changing the boot order in my BIOS to boot the 2nd hard disk (sdb).
> I already tested this procedure using two hard disks each with windows
> installed. With the boot order (in BIOS) changed as previously
> described, I successfully booted to the 2nd hard disk (sdb). This 2nd
> hard disk (sdb) is set to 'slave' on the same 40 pin ribbon cable as
> the 1st hard disk (sda).
>
> My partition scheme (that I have not set-up yet and based somewhat on
> the above link) will be as follows:
>
> 1st Partition -- Boot Partition
> /boot -- Type: Primary -- 500MB -- Ext4 journaling file system --
> Location: Beginning
>
> Second Partition -- Root Partition
> / -- Type: Logical -- 15000MB -- Ext4 journaling file system
> -- Location: Beginning
>
> 3rd Partition -- Home Partition
> /home -- Type: Logical -- 60000MB -- Ext4 journaling file system --
> Location: Beginning
>
> SWAP Area
> Swap -- Type: Logical -- 2000MB -- Ext4 journaling file system --
> Location: Beginning
>
> Question #2 please:
> Is this an acceptable partition set-up? Based on a disk capacity of 80
> gigs, are the allotted partition sizes acceptable? Any suggestions
> please ?
>
> I am also 'meticulously' reading the debian install instructions as
> well and Debian mentions other available directories such as:
> dev, lib, opt, var, usr, sys --- etc. Please see the list of
> additional directories:
> http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs02.html.en
>
> Question #3 please:
> I am not sure if I need to include 'any' of these additional
> directories (listed above) in my partition scheme. I am also studying
> the following programming languages: 'C' then C++ and Object 'C' and
> would like to know if I need to include any additional
> directories/partitions (from the list above) for my 'programming'
> needs.
>
> System specs:
>
>W iWill DVD266R motherboard
> 'Dual' Pentium III cpu's (1 GHz each) Total: 2 GHz
> 1 gig DDR memory
> CD-R/RW
> DVD - R/R
>
> Thank you very much
> wally


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Old 10-09-2012, 11:31 PM
Wally Lepore
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

Hi

In order to be sure that Debian installs successfully, I also have a
USB stick that has the required debian firmware files loaded in the
event the debian installer asks for it during set-up.

Debian said:
If any of the hardware in your system requires non-free firmware to be
loaded with the device driver, you can use one of the tarballs of
common firmware packages or download an non official image including
these non-free firmwares. Instructions how to use the tarballs and
general information about loading firmware during an installation can
be found in the Installation Guide (see Documentation below).

source: http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/debian-installer/

The firmware files were downloaded from:
http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/non-free/firmware/squeeze/current/

Thank you
Wally


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Old 10-09-2012, 11:48 PM
Wolf Halton
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

Wally,

looks like an ok partitioning scheme. Having /home on its own partition means you can keep its contents even if you change the linux installed.

Personally, I don't use a /boot partition; I just use / and /home.


Wolf Halton

http://sourcefreedom.com

Apache developer:

wolfhalton@apache.org

On Oct 9, 2012 7:32 PM, "Wally Lepore" <wallylepore@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi



In order to be sure that Debian installs successfully, I also have a

USB stick that has the required debian firmware files loaded in the

event the debian installer asks for it during set-up.



Debian said:

If any of the hardware in your system requires non-free firmware to be

loaded with the device driver, you can use one of the tarballs of

common firmware packages or download an non official image including

these non-free firmwares. Instructions how to use the tarballs and

general information about loading firmware during an installation can

be found in the Installation Guide (see Documentation below).



source: http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/debian-installer/



The firmware files were downloaded from:

http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/non-free/firmware/squeeze/current/



Thank you

Wally





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Old 10-10-2012, 12:46 AM
Wolf Halton
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

The sizes look sane.

2*ram=swap If your machine hibernates, all the contents of ram goes to swap.

15GB / plenty of space.

.5GB Boot partition.* Safe enough, but every 3 months or so, check capacity with df -h as the drive can fill up with old Linux images.

The rest for home files makes sense as well.


Wolf


PS make sure you Reply All or your email goes off-list.


Wolf Halton

http://sourcefreedom.com

Apache developer:

wolfhalton@apache.org

On Oct 9, 2012 8:13 PM, "Wally Lepore" <wallylepore@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 7:48 PM, Wolf Halton <wolf.halton@gmail.com> wrote:

> Wally,

> looks like an ok partitioning scheme. Having /home on its own partition

> means you can keep its contents even if you change the linux installed.

> Personally, I don't use a /boot partition; I just use / and /home.



Hi Wolf,



Ok thanks. I guess I'm 'okay to go'. What do you think about how much

space I have allocated to each partition? As you can see I have an 80

gig drive (total) that I'm installing debian too. Should I leave some

'free space' in the event I want to add another directory in the

future?



Thank you for your support.

Wally



>

> Wolf Halton

> http://sourcefreedom.com

> Apache developer:

> wolfhalton@apache.org

>

> On Oct 9, 2012 7:32 PM, "Wally Lepore" <wallylepore@gmail.com> wrote:

>>

>> Hi

>>

>> In order to be sure that Debian installs successfully, I also have a

>> USB stick that has the required debian firmware files loaded in the

>> event the debian installer asks for it during set-up.

>>

>> Debian said:

>> If any of the hardware in your system requires non-free firmware to be

>> loaded with the device driver, you can use one of the tarballs of

>> common firmware packages or download an non official image including

>> these non-free firmwares. Instructions how to use the tarballs and

>> general information about loading firmware during an installation can

>> be found in the Installation Guide (see Documentation below).

>>

>> source: http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/debian-installer/

>>

>> The firmware files were downloaded from:

>>

>> http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/non-free/firmware/squeeze/current/

>>

>> Thank you

>> Wally

>>

>>

>> --

>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org

>> with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact

>> listmaster@lists.debian.org

>> Archive:

>> http://lists.debian.org/CALDXikooWbA=f_VoQzjwY9dzN9gEbihREby5FpeKVpOLurUDY Q@mail.gmail.com


>>

>
 
Old 10-10-2012, 12:55 AM
Wally Lepore
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 7:48 PM, Wolf Halton <wolf.halton@gmail.com> wrote:
> Wally,
> looks like an ok partitioning scheme. Having /home on its own partition
> means you can keep its contents even if you change the linux installed.
> Personally, I don't use a /boot partition; I just use / and /home.

Hi Wolf,

Ok thanks. I guess I'm 'okay to go'. What do you think about how much
space I have allocated to each partition? As you can see I have an 80
gig drive (total) that I'm installing debian too. Should I leave some
'free space' in the event I want to add another directory in the
future?

Also read about some other recommended partitioning schemes in the
'short' debian partitioning appendix here:

Appendix C. Partitioning for Debian
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apc.html.en

Specifically these sub-sections (very short in length) titled:

C.1. Deciding on Debian Partitions and Sizes
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs01.html.en

C.2. The Directory Tree
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs02.html.en

C.3. Recommended Partitioning Scheme
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs03.html.en

Thank you for your support.
Wally


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Old 10-10-2012, 01:22 AM
Wally Lepore
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 8:46 PM, Wolf Halton <wolf.halton@gmail.com> wrote:
> The sizes look sane.
> 2*ram=swap If your machine hibernates, all the contents of ram goes to swap.
> 15GB / plenty of space.
> .5GB Boot partition. Safe enough, but every 3 months or so, check capacity
> with df -h as the drive can fill up with old Linux images.
> The rest for home files makes sense as well.

Hi Wolf,

I have 1 gig of DDR RAM. Thus your suggesting I make the swap 2 gigs?
I do let my system hibernate. Also, if I set the swap to 2 gigs, then
the Appendix section 'C3' says,

On some 32-bit architectures (m68k and PowerPC), the maximum size of a
swap partition is 2GB. That should be enough for nearly any
installation. However, if your swap requirements are this high, you
should probably try to spread the swap across different disks (also
called “spindles”) and, if possible, different SCSI or IDE channels.
The kernel will balance swap usage between multiple swap partitions,
giving better performance. -end-

Not sure if this applies to me and my system?

Not to get 'over-partitioned' here but after reading the appendix
section titled,
C.3. Recommended Partitioning Scheme
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs03.html.en

and specifically in Appendix section 'C3' where it says,

"For multi-user systems or systems with lots of disk space, it's best
to put /usr, /var, /tmp, and /home each on their own partitions
separate from the / partition." -end-

I'm now thinking I should set something up like this:

/boot
/
/usr
/var
/home
/tmp
Swap

The section Appendix 'C3' also says,

"You might need a separate /usr/local partition if you plan to install
many programs that are not part of the Debian distribution. If your
machine will be a mail server, you might need to make /var/mail a
separate partition. Often, putting /tmp on its own partition, for
instance 20–50MB, is a good idea. If you are setting up a server with
lots of user accounts, it's generally good to have a separate, large
/home partition. In general, the partitioning situation varies from
computer to computer depending on its uses." -end-

Based on the above, can a directory/partition be named /usr/local ?
and /var/mail ? I thought a directory can have only one name (i.e.
/usr -or- /local -or- /var -or- /mail).

Thank you
Wally


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Old 10-10-2012, 06:17 AM
Linux-Fan
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

On 10/10/2012 03:22 AM, Wally Lepore wrote:
> On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 8:46 PM, Wolf Halton <wolf.halton@gmail.com> wrote:
>> The sizes look sane.
>> 2*ram=swap If your machine hibernates, all the contents of ram goes to swap.
>> 15GB / plenty of space.
>> .5GB Boot partition. Safe enough, but every 3 months or so, check capacity
>> with df -h as the drive can fill up with old Linux images.
>> The rest for home files makes sense as well.
>
> Hi Wolf,
>
> I have 1 gig of DDR RAM. Thus your suggesting I make the swap 2 gigs?
> I do let my system hibernate. Also, if I set the swap to 2 gigs, then
> the Appendix section 'C3' says,
>
> On some 32-bit architectures (m68k and PowerPC), the maximum size of a
> swap partition is 2GB. That should be enough for nearly any
> installation. However, if your swap requirements are this high, you
> should probably try to spread the swap across different disks (also
> called “spindles”) and, if possible, different SCSI or IDE channels.
> The kernel will balance swap usage between multiple swap partitions,
> giving better performance. -end-
>
> Not sure if this applies to me and my system?

I think having more swap is not a problem. The only problem occurs if
you are going to use this swap because you run out of ram. Then the
system will slow down a lot.


> Not to get 'over-partitioned' here but after reading the appendix
> section titled,
> C.3. Recommended Partitioning Scheme
> http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs03.html.en
>
> and specifically in Appendix section 'C3' where it says,
>
> "For multi-user systems or systems with lots of disk space, it's best
> to put /usr, /var, /tmp, and /home each on their own partitions
> separate from the / partition." -end-
>
> I'm now thinking I should set something up like this:
>
> /boot
> /
> /usr
> /var
> /home
> /tmp
> Swap

The system I am currently running uses only two partitions: "/" and
Swap. Therefore it should also be ok to put everything on a single
partition or (as you originally planned) to separate "/home" in order to
be able to re-install the system without deleting your user-files.

> The section Appendix 'C3' also says,
>
> "You might need a separate /usr/local partition if you plan to install
> many programs that are not part of the Debian distribution. If your
> machine will be a mail server, you might need to make /var/mail a
> separate partition. Often, putting /tmp on its own partition, for
> instance 20–50MB, is a good idea. If you are setting up a server with
> lots of user accounts, it's generally good to have a separate, large
> /home partition. In general, the partitioning situation varies from
> computer to computer depending on its uses." -end-
>
> Based on the above, can a directory/partition be named /usr/local ?
> and /var/mail ? I thought a directory can have only one name (i.e.
> /usr -or- /local -or- /var -or- /mail).

You can have /var on your "main" partition (which also contains "/") and
mount another partition in the subdirectory "/var/mail".

> Thank you
> Wally


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Old 10-10-2012, 07:00 AM
Lisi
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

On Tuesday 09 October 2012 23:41:40 Wally Lepore wrote:
> An interesting side note: Both identical drives are 'Enhanced IDE'
> drives (EIDE). However for some reason during the debian set-up, the
> installer identified them as SCSI drives and labeled them as follows
>
> SCSI1 (0,0,0) (sda) -80.0 GB ATA WDC [serial number]
> SCSI1 (0,1,0) (sdb) -80.0 GB ATA WDC [serial number]

Yes, that it is now policy: all hard/dvdrw drives are sdx, even IDE ones. I
can't remember whether that came in with Squeeze or Lenny.

Lisi

sending from KMail! o/


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Old 10-10-2012, 08:41 AM
Brian
 
Default Partition Scheme for installing Debian Squeeze

On Tue 09 Oct 2012 at 18:41:40 -0400, Wally Lepore wrote:

[Snip]

> I will also be utilizing this set-up for dual boot utilizing two
> separate hard disks:
> page 1: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23/dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7-on-a-computer-with-2-hard-drives/
> page 2: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23/dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7-on-a-computer-with-2-hard-drives/2/
>
> I will install the /boot directory to the 2nd hard disk (sdb). Doing
> so, will allow me to view a menu at start-up asking which operating
> system I want to boot (Windows or Debian). This will be accomplished
> by changing the boot order in my BIOS to boot the 2nd hard disk (sdb).
> I already tested this procedure using two hard disks each with windows
> installed. With the boot order (in BIOS) changed as previously
> described, I successfully booted to the 2nd hard disk (sdb). This 2nd
> hard disk (sdb) is set to 'slave' on the same 40 pin ribbon cable as
> the 1st hard disk (sda).

You will want to be sure you are partitioning the correct drive. Usually
it is easy to distinguish between them because the drive containing
Windows will probably have an NTFS filesystem on it. You should also
double-check what the drive designation for Debian is (sda or sdb) when
you finalise partitioning.

At the GRUB install stage you will be told what other operating systems
have been detected and that GRUB will be installed to the MBR of the
first hard drive. What it actually means is that GRUB will be installed
to the MBR of /dev/sda. You will only say yes to this if Debian is on
/dev/sda.

[Snip]

> Question #2 please:
> Is this an acceptable partition set-up? Based on a disk capacity of 80
> gigs, are the allotted partition sizes acceptable? Any suggestions
> please ?

Nice planning. There is sufficient room on /. I'd do without the boot
partition but it does no harm.

> I am also 'meticulously' reading the debian install instructions as
> well and Debian mentions other available directories such as:
> dev, lib, opt, var, usr, sys --- etc. Please see the list of
> additional directories:
> http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/apcs02.html.en
>
> Question #3 please:
> I am not sure if I need to include 'any' of these additional
> directories (listed above) in my partition scheme. I am also studying
> the following programming languages: 'C' then C++ and Object 'C' and
> would like to know if I need to include any additional
> directories/partitions (from the list above) for my 'programming'
> needs.

For the use you will put the OS to I'd stick to your plan. It has the
benefit of simplicity and ease of implementation.


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