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Old 09-19-2012, 01:34 AM
Kumar Appaiah
 
Default EXIM in Debian

On Tue, Sep 18, 2012 at 08:46:55PM -0400, Mark Robinson wrote:
> I know it might not be in the right group but is related mostly with
> Debian.
> There is Exim 4.72 under Debian with split configuration files.
> I need to remove header and I know how to do in Exim. In section
> remote_smtp add remove_headers=blablabla.
>
> How I can do in Debian Exim with split configuration?

The exim4-config includes the man page exim4-config_files for standard
changes. I'd suggest that you have a look at the files in
/etc/exim4/conf.d, make your changes as needed, and run
update-exim4.conf to write them to generate the configuration.

Kumar
--
Intel engineering seem to have misheard Intel marketing strategy. The phrase
was "Divide and conquer" not "Divide and cock up"
(By iialan@www.linux.org.uk, Alan Cox)


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Old 09-19-2012, 02:17 PM
Camaleón
 
Default EXIM in Debian

On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 20:46:55 -0400, Mark Robinson wrote:

(please, no html posts, thanks...)

> I know it might not be in the right group but is related mostly with
> Debian.

Nah, this group is perfect but you may also be interested in:

http://lists.alioth.debian.org/mailman/listinfo/pkg-exim4-users

> There is Exim 4.72 under Debian with split configuration files.

Splitting is optional, it depend on how you first configured it.

> I need to remove header and I know how to do in Exim. In section
> remote_smtp add remove_headers=blablabla.
>
> How I can do in Debian Exim with split configuration?

The basics of Exim in Debian are documented here:

http://pkg-exim4.alioth.debian.org/README/README.Debian.html
http://wiki.debian.org/PkgExim4UserFAQ

Anyhow, consider using the transport macros configuration files where
this setting belongs to.

Greetings,

--
Camaleón


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Old 09-20-2012, 12:47 PM
Jon Dowland
 
Default EXIM in Debian

Do you need split configuration? Are you wedded to it? My advice would be to
copy /var/lib/exim4/config.autogenerated to /etc/exim4.conf, at which point the
Debian exim configuration is overridden, and just edit that one file instead.


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Old 09-20-2012, 05:10 PM
Martin Steigerwald
 
Default EXIM in Debian

Am Donnerstag, 20. September 2012 schrieb Jon Dowland:
> Do you need split configuration? Are you wedded to it? My advice would
> be to copy /var/lib/exim4/config.autogenerated to /etc/exim4.conf, at
> which point the Debian exim configuration is overridden, and just edit
> that one file instead.

I think its better to configure exim4 for single configuration file by
whatever means is described in the wiki page Camaleón linked to, likely an

dpkg-reconfigure exim4something

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Old 09-21-2012, 03:48 PM
Mark Robinson
 
Default EXIM in Debian

No, I am not, but it is principal.

On Sep 20, 2012 8:48 AM, "Jon Dowland" <jmtd@debian.org> wrote:
Do you need split configuration? Are you wedded to it? My advice would be to

copy /var/lib/exim4/config.autogenerated to /etc/exim4.conf, at which point the

Debian exim configuration is overridden, and just edit that one file instead.





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Old 09-21-2012, 04:58 PM
Jon Dowland
 
Default EXIM in Debian

On Thu, Sep 20, 2012 at 07:10:18PM +0200, Martin Steigerwald wrote:
> I think its better to configure exim4 for single configuration file by
> whatever means is described in the wiki page Camaleón linked to, likely an
>
> dpkg-reconfigure exim4something

We differ in our opinion.

In my opinion, for anything but the simplest of deployments, the
Debian packaging introduces more complexity than it hides from you.
If you have to modify an exim configuration file by hand, and need
to know exim syntax, then you might as well do away with the Debian
framework. It just adds another layer that you need to understand,
with its own foibles and problems.

I've been running exim on Debian for a long time and this was the best
piece of advice I was ever given on the matter.


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Old 09-22-2012, 09:48 PM
Ross Boylan
 
Default EXIM in Debian

On Fri, 2012-09-21 at 17:58 +0100, Jon Dowland wrote:
> On Thu, Sep 20, 2012 at 07:10:18PM +0200, Martin Steigerwald wrote:
> > I think its better to configure exim4 for single configuration file by
> > whatever means is described in the wiki page Camaleón linked to, likely an
> >
> > dpkg-reconfigure exim4something
>
> We differ in our opinion.
>
> In my opinion, for anything but the simplest of deployments, the
> Debian packaging introduces more complexity than it hides from you.
> If you have to modify an exim configuration file by hand, and need
> to know exim syntax, then you might as well do away with the Debian
> framework. It just adds another layer that you need to understand,
> with its own foibles and problems.
>
> I've been running exim on Debian for a long time and this was the best
> piece of advice I was ever given on the matter.
>
I find the split configuration more convenient. For one thing, if one
of the pieces gets updated your customizations will be unaffected. I'm
not sure that's true with the monolithic configuration.

Second, it is unclear to me what the OP was trying to do. If the goal
is to remove a header field from messages then you need to find the
appropriate router in /etc/exim4/conf.d/router and add a header_delete
directive. If you want to do it for all routers you can probably create
a router that appears before the others, e.g. name the file
050_local_delete, and have the router delete the header and pass the
message on (I don't recall the exact commands, but I think they exist).

Another possible issue is that you may have trouble figuring out which
router is active. If that is the case, your issue may be understanding
the prebuilt config that comes with debian, rather than whether it is
split or not.

The package has a very useful README.Debian intended as a jumping off
point for the documentation,
e.g. /usr/share/doc/exim4-config/README.Debian.gz.

Third, I'm a bit puzzled by Jon's remarks quoted above. Martin
recommends using a single, aka monolothic configuration file. Jon says
"I disagree" but then suggests doing away with the debian framework.

Anyway, you can choose any of 3 approaches to configuration:
1. Use the split config in conjunction with the package management tools
(debconf) to configure exim.

2. Like 1, but use the monolithic config file. It's not clear to if
changes you make in debconf, or that the package might make on upgrade,
will get integrated in to the monolithic file in this case.

3. Don't use the Debian config stuff, and the exim4-config package, at
all and just write your own configuration file. Presumably you'd borrow
from an existing one.

If your needs are relatively simple and fit well into one of the types
of setups the Debian configuration file is meant to support, that favors
1. As they get more complex, the balance may shift down the list, and
is also just a matter of personal preference.


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Old 09-23-2012, 09:16 AM
Joe
 
Default EXIM in Debian

On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 14:48:38 -0700
Ross Boylan <ross@biostat.ucsf.edu> wrote:

>
> Anyway, you can choose any of 3 approaches to configuration:
> 1. Use the split config in conjunction with the package management
> tools (debconf) to configure exim.
>
> 2. Like 1, but use the monolithic config file. It's not clear to if
> changes you make in debconf, or that the package might make on
> upgrade, will get integrated in to the monolithic file in this case.
>

Exim4 separated from debconf itself between, I think, etch and lenny.
Any debconf material left in the configuration file then caused the
installation of the new exim4 during the upgrade to die horribly, in a
way that even dpkg couldn't fix. Guess who fell into that one. That was
a mandatory 'use package maintainer's configuration', but I hadn't seen
that coming, and made the wrong choice when it was offered.

The exim4 dpkg configuration questionnaire now produces macro constants
which are interpreted within the configuration file(s), so anything
done here will generally be preserved across upgrades. With the single
file, it is encouraged to make further customisations in terms of macro
constants, and set these in exim.conf.localmacros, and if it is
necessary to add new code, to do it in new files in the conf.d
structure, having switched to 'split-file'. The ultimate aim is to
leave the original configuration file/files untouched, with all user
modifications made in user-created files, so that user customisations
are completely untouched by upgrades (at least so far as no functional
changes occur). I can appreciate the desire for this, having had to go
through the old and new configuration files line by line to ensure
sensible translation, after the problem I had during the upgrade.

While I have not actually done a concatenation of the as-supplied split
files and compared them to the monolithic one, nothing I have ever seen
leads me to believe they would be different, apart from some comments.
The section names and numbers in the monolithic file should allow a
given bit of code to be found among the split files. The user macros
are handled slightly differently, as exim.conf.localmacros is not used,
but it shouldn't be hard to see how.

I have to admit to using the single file, as I haven't yet had the
enthusiasm to go through my old (sarge?) and heavily-customised one to
break it into the bite-sized conf.d chunks. I've done a bit of it,
removing my list of banned TLDs and placing it in a separate file,
referred to by macro expansion. But there's a lot more to go, and if
it ain't broke...

--
Joe


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Old 09-23-2012, 05:10 PM
lee
 
Default EXIM in Debian

Joe <joe@jretrading.com> writes:

> I have to admit to using the single file, as I haven't yet had the
> enthusiasm to go through my old (sarge?) and heavily-customised one to
> break it into the bite-sized conf.d chunks.

Just stay with your own configuration file. Split configurations are evil.


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Old 09-23-2012, 05:45 PM
Jon Dowland
 
Default EXIM in Debian

On Sat, Sep 22, 2012 at 02:48:38PM -0700, Ross Boylan wrote:
> Third, I'm a bit puzzled by Jon's remarks quoted above. Martin
> recommends using a single, aka monolothic configuration file. Jon says
> "I disagree" but then suggests doing away with the debian framework.

Martin was replying to me. My message suggested moving away from Debian's
framework. Martin replied suggesting that instead of doing that, you should
move to a monolithic file, controlled by Debian's framework. I replied
because I felt my point was missed: you can use split or monolithic with
the Debian framework or without.

> 2. Like 1, but use the monolithic config file. It's not clear to if
> changes you make in debconf, or that the package might make on upgrade,
> will get integrated in to the monolithic file in this case.

They are.

> 3. Don't use the Debian config stuff, and the exim4-config package, at
> all and just write your own configuration file. Presumably you'd borrow
> from an existing one.

In the recipe I gave, the existing one you'd be basing it on is the one
generated by the Debian framework: so incorporating all the specifics that
were generated from your answers to the debconf questions.


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