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lee 09-11-2012 03:26 PM

deprecated ( What Version To Install On iMac?)
 
Chris Bannister <cbannister@slingshot.co.nz> writes:

> On Mon, Sep 10, 2012 at 09:55:21PM +0200, lee wrote:
>>
>> "Disapproved" is as much an adjective as "deprecated".
>
> Not when I went to school. English is not your native language?

No, it isn't. Do you mean "disapprove" or really "disapproved"? If
"disapproved", why isn't that an adjective? Perhaps there's something I
don't understand at all ...

How about: "The administrator installed deprecated software. Since then,
many users have had trouble with the system and disapproved of the
administrator."

I can see that "disapproved" isn't an adjective here and get some idea
about why it is "disapproved of" and not just "disapproved". Now:

"The administrator installed disapproved software. Since then, many
users have had trouble with the system and the administrator became
deprecated."

"Disapproved" would now be an adjective, same as "deprecated". In both
cases, "deprecated" is an adjective. You could also say "... and
deprecated the administrator". What would that be?

Are you saying it's not possible to say that "the administrator
installed disapproved software" because "disapproved" cannot be used as
an adjective? Same as it won't be possible to say "... and deprecated
the administrator" because "deprecated" cannot be used transitively?

How do you call it when software or an administrator is being
deprecated, i. e. the process of deprecating something/making something
deprecated? Deprecation? Then you would have to say something like "The
users deprecated the administrator." or "The manufacturer of the system
deprecated the software the administrator installed.". Or is there
another word for this? (There's the possibility that disapproving of the
software doesn't make the software deprecated, like someone can
disapprove of libreoffice, which doesn't mean it's deprecated.)


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Chris Bannister 09-12-2012 11:44 PM

deprecated ( What Version To Install On iMac?)
 
On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 05:26:09PM +0200, lee wrote:
> "The administrator installed disapproved software. Since then, many

No. That would have got you a smack over the hand with a ruler. :)

> users have had trouble with the system and the administrator became
> deprecated."

Doesn't seem right. People don't become deprecated, not in common usage
anyway.

> "Disapproved" would now be an adjective, same as "deprecated". In both
> cases, "deprecated" is an adjective. You could also say "... and
> deprecated the administrator". What would that be?

That would be wrong, and another smack over the hand with a ruler, for
arguing with the "teacher" (not me, just imagining you sitting in your
chair with teacher standing over you with ruler.)


> Are you saying it's not possible to say that "the administrator
> installed disapproved software" because "disapproved" cannot be used as
> an adjective?

Yes.

> How do you call it when software or an administrator is being
> deprecated, i. e. the process of deprecating something/making something

I can only think of the word "redundant" (surplus to requirements) at
the moment. e.g. The administrator was made redundant because of
restructuring.

> software doesn't make the software deprecated, like someone can
> disapprove of libreoffice, which doesn't mean it's deprecated.)

True. I'm sure Lisi could explain it better, although it is getting way
off topic.

--
"If you're not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people
who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the
oppressing." --- Malcolm X


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Neal Murphy 09-13-2012 01:15 AM

deprecated ( What Version To Install On iMac?)
 
On Wednesday, September 12, 2012 07:44:03 PM Chris Bannister wrote:
> > How do you call it when software or an administrator is being
> > deprecated, i. e. the process of deprecating something/making something
>
> I can only think of the word "redundant" (surplus to requirements) at
> the moment. e.g. The administrator was made redundant because of
> restructuring.

I believe the idiom you are looking for is 'put out to pasture': it is no
longer needed in any way and serves no function, but remains until death and
the knacker has carted it off.


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Mark Allums 09-13-2012 03:24 AM

deprecated ( What Version To Install On iMac?)
 
On 9/12/2012 6:44 PM, Chris Bannister wrote:

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 05:26:09PM +0200, lee wrote:

Are you saying it's not possible to say that "the administrator
installed disapproved software" because "disapproved" cannot be used as
an adjective?


Yes


I would say, in American English* "the administrator installed
unapproved software", in the same situation, although that phrasing
seems less precise. "Unapproved" might imply "for now", meaning it
might still be approved at a later date. "Disapproved" might mean
"rejected", if it were otherwise grammatically correct.


Mark
[*] Please, let's not argue over the validity of the phrase "American
English". :)




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lee 09-13-2012 05:47 PM

deprecated ( What Version To Install On iMac?)
 
Chris Bannister <cbannister@slingshot.co.nz> writes:

> On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 05:26:09PM +0200, lee wrote:
>> "The administrator installed disapproved software. Since then, many
>
> No. That would have got you a smack over the hand with a ruler. :)

Then how do you say that?

>> users have had trouble with the system and the administrator became
>> deprecated."
>
> Doesn't seem right. People don't become deprecated, not in common usage
> anyway.

Ok, let's say "users had trouble with the system and (using) the system
became deprecated." and consider that it is not the best possible
example, so give it some leeway.

>> "Disapproved" would now be an adjective, same as "deprecated". In both
>> cases, "deprecated" is an adjective. You could also say "... and
>> deprecated the administrator". What would that be?
>
> That would be wrong, and another smack over the hand with a ruler, for
> arguing with the "teacher" (not me, just imagining you sitting in your
> chair with teacher standing over you with ruler.)

That teacher (not you) would find their ruler shoved up somewhere where
they probably won't like it very much because I don't let myself being
treated like that. I'm just trying to understand something. If I was
arguing, I might say that warding something off by prayer seems more
likely to work with humans than with machines or systems, so people
*can* be deprecated (much easier than machines or systems). It just
depends on the people whom you try to deprecate ... (Teacher might then
say I'm a smartass. I could live with that because I already know that
I'm smarter than the teacher:)

>> Are you saying it's not possible to say that "the administrator
>> installed disapproved software" because "disapproved" cannot be used as
>> an adjective?
>
> Yes.

Hm ok, so it's "deprecated software"? Is there a direct synonym for
"deprecated"? Hmm ... " 'disapproved of' software" maybe? Or
"discommended software"?[1]


[1]: http://thesaurus.com/browse/deprecate


>> How do you call it when software or an administrator is being
>> deprecated, i. e. the process of deprecating something/making something
>
> I can only think of the word "redundant" (surplus to requirements) at
> the moment. e.g. The administrator was made redundant because of
> restructuring.

Hm I wouldn't use that because it has a very different meaning for me
which goes more into the direction of [2]. Besides [2], the point with
redundancy is that it can be assumed as something actually useful to
decide whether a judgement is actually true or not. (See the being
smarter than the teacher thing as another bad example for redundancy;)

So the teacher (administrator) became "superfluous" or "unnecessary" ---
which won't be the same as deprecated: He might still be needed.


[2]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundancy_theory_of_truth


>> software doesn't make the software deprecated, like someone can
>> disapprove of libreoffice, which doesn't mean it's deprecated.)
>
> True. I'm sure Lisi could explain it better, although it is getting way
> off topic.

Yeah, I know --- I find it very interesting, though :)


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