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Old 08-15-2012, 03:52 AM
"Weaver"
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

Greetings all,

What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed
from my ISP?

I want to log and then print out, so I can then forward the information
with an ultimatum.
I can't fail in a contract if they have, repeatedly, first.
It's been going on for a year and I'm sick of being ripped off and having
my intelligence insulted by entities that haven't out-grown their acne,
that know no more of the situation than quoting their prepared lines from
help-desk school at me.

Thanks for any time and trouble you may care to take.
Regards,

Weaver.

--
"I invite you to name a society that created a secret prison
system, outside the rule of law, where torture takes place,
that sooner or later didn't turn the abuse against it's own
citizens. -- Naomi Wolf - October 11, 2007


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Old 08-15-2012, 06:07 AM
Bonno Bloksma
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

Hi Weaver,

> What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed from my ISP?

> I want to log and then print out, so I can then forward the information with an ultimatum.
> I can't fail in a contract if they have, repeatedly, first.
> It's been going on for a year and I'm sick of being ripped off and having my intelligence insulted by entities
> that haven't out-grown their acne, that know no more of the situation than quoting their
> prepared lines from help-desk school at me.
>
> Thanks for any time and trouble you may care to take.

I use munin to keep track of a lot of hardware related issues on my Linux machine, including ethX traffic info.
If you want to track the router stats and your router supports SNMP then you might also have a look at mrtg.
Both tools make graphs for daily, weekly, monthly and yearly data.

Yours sincerely,
Bonno Bloksma
senior systemadministrator

tio
university of applied sciences
julianalaan*9 / 7553 ab**hengelo
t*+31 (0)74-255 06 10 / f*+31 (0)74-255 06 11
The Netherlands
b.bloksma@tio.nl*/*www.tio.nl

Follow us at*Twitter*/*Facebook*/*Hyves*/*YouTube
 
Old 08-15-2012, 06:19 AM
Mihamina Rakotomandimby
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

On 08/15/2012 06:52 AM, Weaver wrote:

What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed
from my ISP?


To achieve this, you will have to load continuously your connection in
order to get the max reached.
- If you do this (load test) on your gateway, your poor LAN users wont
even be able to use the link.
- If you wait for your users to benchload the link, that means you dont
have QoS, then you'll have very bad end-result and very bad user
feeling, because a minority will eat the bandwidth up. And at night,
when no one is in the office, all computers off, you wont log anything...
- If you ever test from one location (say one dedicated server to your
gateway), you also will have to assume the server is not bandwidth
overloaded, and has guaranteed bandwidth. If you cant assume that, your
ISP will say "it's not me, your server is not bandwidth garanteed".



So, to me there is not real solution, but just complain in time when you
need the bandwith and dont get it.


--
RMA.


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Old 08-15-2012, 11:19 AM
Darac Marjal
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 09:19:06AM +0300, Mihamina Rakotomandimby wrote:
> On 08/15/2012 06:52 AM, Weaver wrote:
> >What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed
> >from my ISP?
>
> To achieve this, you will have to load continuously your connection
> in order to get the max reached.

I'm not entirely sure this is true. If your router has a statistics page
(or a telnet interface providing such information), it's possible to use
a package such as munin to log[1] the sync rate of your line periodically.
This can be graphed for evidential purposes.

The sync rate of the line should be sufficient information in most
cases. If you're synchronised at, say 8Mb down and 1Mb up, then that
should be close to what you can achieve. You can expect a little below
that due to overheads, but if you're experiencing significantly worse
throughput than that, then there's a problem somewhere in the network.

I probably ought to point out, though, that most ISPs advertise their
broadband as "up to X meg", and you may find that anything between
56kpbs and that figure are legally acceptable (any slower and it's
not broadband).

[1] I'll leave it up to the reader to work out how to screen scrape
their router's statistics page.
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:51 PM
Camaleón
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

On Tue, 14 Aug 2012 20:52:59 -0700, Weaver wrote:

> What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed
> from my ISP?

Well, there are online tests that you can run to measure your (up/down)
link speed:

http://www.speedtest.net/
http://www.ookla.com/demo-custom.php

> I want to log and then print out, so I can then forward the information
> with an ultimatum.

He, he... welcome to the club and good luck with your documented
complaint. At least here in Spain, ISPs do what they want and users are
only a PITA that pays a monthy bill but has little rights :-P

> I can't fail in a contract if they have, repeatedly, first. It's been
> going on for a year and I'm sick of being ripped off and having my
> intelligence insulted by entities that haven't out-grown their acne,
> that know no more of the situation than quoting their prepared lines
> from help-desk school at me.

You can also find more useful about your connection quality and other
technical measures from your DSL router itself. Depending on the model
you'll can find a precise activity log that will tell you the speed your
line is synced with the central telephone exchange and also when DSL
status is going down/up or about PPPoE errors.

Greetings,

--
Camaleón


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Old 08-15-2012, 10:19 PM
hvw59601
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

Camaleón wrote:

On Tue, 14 Aug 2012 20:52:59 -0700, Weaver wrote:


What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed
from my ISP?


Well, there are online tests that you can run to measure your (up/down)
link speed:


http://www.speedtest.net/
http://www.ookla.com/demo-custom.php


I want to log and then print out, so I can then forward the information
with an ultimatum.


He, he... welcome to the club and good luck with your documented
complaint. At least here in Spain, ISPs do what they want and users are
only a PITA that pays a monthy bill but has little rights :-P




Here in Mexico my only right is to pay the bill and take what they give
me, like it ot not.


Hugo



I can't fail in a contract if they have, repeatedly, first. It's been
going on for a year and I'm sick of being ripped off and having my
intelligence insulted by entities that haven't out-grown their acne,
that know no more of the situation than quoting their prepared lines
from help-desk school at me.


You can also find more useful about your connection quality and other
technical measures from your DSL router itself. Depending on the model
you'll can find a precise activity log that will tell you the speed your
line is synced with the central telephone exchange and also when DSL
status is going down/up or about PPPoE errors.


Greetings,




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Old 08-16-2012, 01:18 PM
"Weaver"
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

> Camaleón wrote:
>> On Tue, 14 Aug 2012 20:52:59 -0700, Weaver wrote:
>>
>>> What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic
>>> speed
>>> from my ISP?
>>
>> Well, there are online tests that you can run to measure your (up/down)
>> link speed:
>>
>> http://www.speedtest.net/
>> http://www.ookla.com/demo-custom.php
>>
>>> I want to log and then print out, so I can then forward the information
>>> with an ultimatum.
>>
>> He, he... welcome to the club and good luck with your documented
>> complaint. At least here in Spain, ISPs do what they want and users are
>> only a PITA that pays a monthy bill but has little rights :-P
>>
>
> Here in Mexico my only right is to pay the bill and take what they give
> me, like it ot not.
>
> Hugo
>
>
>>> I can't fail in a contract if they have, repeatedly, first. It's been
>>> going on for a year and I'm sick of being ripped off and having my
>>> intelligence insulted by entities that haven't out-grown their acne,
>>> that know no more of the situation than quoting their prepared lines
>>> from help-desk school at me.
>>
>> You can also find more useful about your connection quality and other
>> technical measures from your DSL router itself. Depending on the model
>> you'll can find a precise activity log that will tell you the speed your
>> line is synced with the central telephone exchange and also when DSL
>> status is going down/up or about PPPoE errors.

O.K., thanks one and all.
That should give me enough to work on for a while.
Regards and thanks,

Weaver.
--
"I invite you to name a society that created a secret prison
system, outside the rule of law, where torture takes place,
that sooner or later didn't turn the abuse against it's own
citizens. -- Naomi Wolf - October 11, 2007


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Old 08-20-2012, 08:37 PM
"Weaver"
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

> On Tue, 14 Aug 2012 20:52:59 -0700, Weaver wrote:
>
>> What's the best programme to employ with regard to logging traffic speed
>> from my ISP?
>
> Well, there are online tests that you can run to measure your (up/down)
> link speed:
>
> http://www.speedtest.net/
> http://www.ookla.com/demo-custom.php
>
>> I want to log and then print out, so I can then forward the information
>> with an ultimatum.
>
> He, he... welcome to the club and good luck with your documented
> complaint. At least here in Spain, ISPs do what they want and users are
> only a PITA that pays a monthy bill but has little rights :-P
>
>> I can't fail in a contract if they have, repeatedly, first. It's been
>> going on for a year and I'm sick of being ripped off and having my
>> intelligence insulted by entities that haven't out-grown their acne,
>> that know no more of the situation than quoting their prepared lines
>> from help-desk school at me.
>
> You can also find more useful about your connection quality and other
> technical measures from your DSL router itself. Depending on the model
> you'll can find a precise activity log that will tell you the speed your
> line is synced with the central telephone exchange and also when DSL
> status is going down/up or about PPPoE errors.

Just to clarify on this situation:

I have a cable connection that is rated at 100MB/s at full capacity.
I specifically asked what the lowest speed would be, that I could expect
to experience, when I took it on from an ADSL2+ connection that I tracked
at 8 BYTES/s at one stage, and they said 100Kb/s (really!).

I regularly log 40-47Kb/s on updates..
Cheers,

Weaver.

--
"I invite you to name a society that created a secret prison
system, outside the rule of law, where torture takes place,
that sooner or later didn't turn the abuse against it's own
citizens. -- Naomi Wolf - October 11, 2007


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Old 08-21-2012, 01:53 PM
Camaleón
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 13:37:43 -0700, Weaver wrote:

> Just to clarify on this situation:
>
> I have a cable connection that is rated at 100MB/s at full capacity. I
> specifically asked what the lowest speed would be, that I could expect
> to experience, when I took it on from an ADSL2+ connection that I
> tracked at 8 BYTES/s at one stage, and they said 100Kb/s (really!).

We also have a fast link at the office (FTTH) rated at 100/10 Mbits and
while the overall usual browsing is noticeabily faster, true is that when
you are downloading a big file from a host the speed can vary a lot from
one server to another.

For instance, using the fiber link to go out, I can get a suitanable rate
of 8 Mbits when downloading VirtualBox (~80 MiB) from Oracle servers
while that speed slow downs as soon as I get a different file from a
different host. Meaning: link speed matters but also does the capability
of the server where you get the files because most of them limit the
speed to avoid being collapsed :-)

> I regularly log 40-47Kb/s on updates.. Cheers,

That's very litte even for a plain ADSL2+ line but the problem can be
located at the server side not the client (you/your ISP network). Try
with a different mirror to compare speeds or use Oracle servers -which
are really fast- to get a random file, that will provide you with a more
"real sense" about you line capabilities.

Greetings,

--
Camaleón


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Old 08-21-2012, 07:28 PM
Rick Thomas
 
Default Logging ISP Download Speed.

On Aug 21, 2012, at 6:53 AM, Camaleón wrote:


On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 13:37:43 -0700, Weaver wrote:



I regularly log 40-47Kb/s on updates.. Cheers,



And so do we all... The problem here is not the network bandwidth,
it's that some parts of the update process have to download a lot of
small files (a few KiB each). Each file involves a negotiation
process that needs several round-trips and one or more file-directory
lookups on the part of both the server and the client. The round-
trips may be on the order of hundreds of milliseconds, so the time to
retrieve a 4 KiB file can be on the order of a half second or more.
That translates to 8KiB/s for that particular file. Sad, but it's a
fact of life on a global-scale packet switched network.


Look at the reported speed when downloading a large package. Here you
have the opportunity to take full advantage of a big pipe and large
windows on each end to fill the pipe. Your limiting rate here is more
likely to be the ability of the server to get your file off its disk
at the same time as it's getting other files for other clients off the
same disk.


For example, I find that getting security updates is much slower
(factor of 4 or 5, often) than getting new packages from one of the
big mirrors. The "security.debian.org" server seems to be a
bottleneck. There's a design trade-off here -- between getting
security stuff posted and available quickly (in favor of a single
server or at most a small number of servers), and getting it out at
high bandwidth (in favor of mirroring it to lots of servers with the
attendant polling delays) the Debian folks have opted to get security
stuff available quickly but at a lower bandwidth, and regular package
updates available with some delay but at higher bandwidth.


Hope this helps to understand what you're seeing.

Rick

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