FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Debian > Debian User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 06-18-2012, 05:56 PM
Glenn English
 
Default wordpress/apache

On Jun 18, 2012, at 11:16 AM, Camaleón wrote:

> If you're using Debian stock Wordpress package there has to be
> information for its setting up under the usual path "/usr/share/doc/
> wordpress/README.Debian" :-?

I got the WordPress PHP going with an alias config in /etc/apache2/conf.d
and was at the point of adding debugging prints to figure out why the PHP
files were aborting without making any pixels. It looks like the 'setup-mysql'
did something that made the PHP start working. I still don't understand,
but thanks very much!

--
Glenn English
hand-wrapped from my Apple Mail




--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: 9D4E9797-0213-4D5B-8CCA-DBCF66A85BDD@slsware.com">http://lists.debian.org/9D4E9797-0213-4D5B-8CCA-DBCF66A85BDD@slsware.com
 
Old 06-18-2012, 06:10 PM
Chris Davies
 
Default wordpress/apache

Glenn English <ghe@slsware.com> wrote:
> I've installed the squeeze Apache, PHP, MySQL, and Wordpress
> packages and there's nothing there when I point a browser at it.

> I see the PHP info. I think I need something to get Apache to run
> the index.php (and its friends) file in /usr/share/wordpress. How do
> I do this?

I think what I did when trying this out the other day was this:
cd /var/www && sudo ln -s /usr/share/wordpress

Then reference the Wordpress stuff via http://localhost/wordpress/

I remember scratching my head of this and then shrugging my shoulders,
as usually Debian packages "just work" (or nearly so). There is an
/etc/wordpress/htaccess file that looks like it is supposed to end up
being modified as /var/www/.htaccess, but I couldn't see how that would
work with Wordpress as a subdirectory. If you want http://localhost/
to be your Wordpress system then I'd look at changing the definitions
related to the Document Root in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default

Chris


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: uh74b9xf9p.ln2@news.roaima.co.uk">http://lists.debian.org/uh74b9xf9p.ln2@news.roaima.co.uk
 
Old 06-18-2012, 08:22 PM
Glenn English
 
Default wordpress/apache

On Jun 18, 2012, at 12:10 PM, Chris Davies wrote:

> I think what I did when trying this out the other day was this:
> cd /var/www && sudo ln -s /usr/share/wordpress

I did that part by copying to a file called wp.conf in /etc/apache2/conf.d
from /usr/share/doc/wordpress/examples/apache.conf. The edited version contains:

> Alias /blog /usr/share/wordpress
> <Directory /usr/share/wordpress>
> Options FollowSymLinks
> AllowOverride Limit Options FileInfo
> DirectoryIndex index.php
> </Directory>

And I made a directory called 'blog' in /var/www. That makes Apache think
the stuff in /usr/share/wordpress is in /var/www/blog. According to my
Apache2 book, this is better than a soft link (don't remember why).

Then the problem became that setup-mysql hurled because it couldn't ping
interface.slsware.com, the server WP is on. All it could get to was the 1918
DMZ net IP -- like it's supposed to. A secondary IP on eth0 fixed that, and it
seems to be running now.

WordPress is *not* trivial to set up, as it advertises. Not from the Debian
package and trying for some security, anyway. I had to do a lot that I
never needed before, some of which I've been told never to do on the
Internet. I'm glad I have a dedicated server for it, so I'll have a better
chance at keeping the badGuys away from it.

There are always a million things to get right before something works. But with
this, there was very little, except a blank screen, to give me a hint of what
was still bent.

I don't understand Debian's thinking on this. It's nice that they put the config
files in /etc, and the README was helpful. But when apt's finished installing, it
doesn't work. It's a long way from working. I don't ever remember seeing that before
in a .deb package.

--
Glenn English
hand-wrapped from my Apple Mail




--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: E63BB77E-A3B5-4235-B8FD-1FC24FEA2FE1@slsware.com">http://lists.debian.org/E63BB77E-A3B5-4235-B8FD-1FC24FEA2FE1@slsware.com
 
Old 06-18-2012, 10:19 PM
Chris Davies
 
Default wordpress/apache

Glenn English <ghe@slsware.com> wrote:
> Then the problem became that setup-mysql hurled because it couldn't
> ping interface.slsware.com, the server WP is on. All it could get to
> was the 1918 DMZ net IP -- like it's supposed to. A secondary IP on
> eth0 fixed that, and it seems to be running now.

I think an entry in /etc/hosts would have been my choice, but I can see
that a secondary IP would work pretty well. What about putting it on lo
rather than eth0, though?


> WordPress is *not* trivial to set up, as it advertises. Not from the
> Debian package and trying for some security, anyway.

It was (a little) easier from the "official" tarball. But how secure
the resulting installation is, I don't know. At least it's still only
on my laptop ;-)

Chris


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: u4m4b9x43u.ln2@news.roaima.co.uk">http://lists.debian.org/u4m4b9x43u.ln2@news.roaima.co.uk
 
Old 06-18-2012, 11:36 PM
Glenn English
 
Default wordpress/apache

On Jun 18, 2012, at 4:19 PM, Chris Davies wrote:

> I think an entry in /etc/hosts would have been my choice, but I can see
> that a secondary IP would work pretty well. What about putting it on lo
> rather than eth0, though?

I hadn't thought of that -- the program said it couldn't ping a FQDN. I
assumed it was using the IP, but I can see how that might be a much better
solution. I'll give it a try. Thanks.

> It was (a little) easier from the "official" tarball. But how secure
> the resulting installation is, I don't know. At least it's still only
> on my laptop ;-)

I tried several different installs, including the factory recommendation.
I thought it was easier too, but I wanted the Debian update process behind
it. And I think your 'hosts' trick will make it more secure -- there's nobody
responding to the IP given out by DNS. Not on the DMZ, anyway...

--
Glenn English
hand-wrapped from my Apple Mail




--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: 6E41C07A-EF2B-4345-8B42-CF51DE719983@slsware.com">http://lists.debian.org/6E41C07A-EF2B-4345-8B42-CF51DE719983@slsware.com
 
Old 06-19-2012, 01:00 AM
Tony Baldwin
 
Default wordpress/apache

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 07:10:38PM +0100, Chris Davies wrote:
> Glenn English <ghe@slsware.com> wrote:
> > I've installed the squeeze Apache, PHP, MySQL, and Wordpress
> > packages and there's nothing there when I point a browser at it.
>
> > I see the PHP info. I think I need something to get Apache to run
> > the index.php (and its friends) file in /usr/share/wordpress. How do
> > I do this?
>
> I think what I did when trying this out the other day was this:
> cd /var/www && sudo ln -s /usr/share/wordpress
>
> Then reference the Wordpress stuff via http://localhost/wordpress/
>
> I remember scratching my head of this and then shrugging my shoulders,
> as usually Debian packages "just work" (or nearly so). There is an
> /etc/wordpress/htaccess file that looks like it is supposed to end up
> being modified as /var/www/.htaccess, but I couldn't see how that would
> work with Wordpress as a subdirectory. If you want http://localhost/
> to be your Wordpress system then I'd look at changing the definitions
> related to the Document Root in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default
>
> Chris

As far as "just work", this is generally the case for a lot of stuff,
but for a web application, you have to consider that not everyone wants
to use only wordpress as their webroot, which is why such things are
left to the user to configure, rather than automagical.
Your wordpress will install in /usr/share/wordpress, but you have to
tell apache where it is, of course, which, as indicate above, is
generally done by adding a vhost file in /etc/apache2/sites-available/
(and symlinking that in ../sites-enabled), or just in the
/etc/apache2/httpd.conf or apache2.conf

Frankly, I tried to install wp from the debian pkg before, and it was a
headache. Most web applications I install from upstream sources, even
when there are debian packages (dokuwiki, wordpress, gallery, and others
I do this way), sometimes especially if the app has a git repo, which
renders keeping them more up-to-date easier.
I just install them where I want them somewhere in the webroot
(/var/www/somesubdir).
I always run Stable on servers, and packages can end up two years old,
as you likely know, and for some stuff, a lot can happen in two years.
But, if you, say, install dokuwiki from the debian package, and then
update it via the built-in updater thingy, you may have problems.
This is why I just install from the upstream sources and use the
package's own updating mechanisms, in general, now.
It's funny, I stick with stable for the server os, but run apps on the
bleeding development edge from git repos all the time, now. Perhaps
that seems contradictory. Of course, when you're contributing to a
project in git, you want to run the latest code, anyway, at least if not
on a production server, somewhere on a test server, perhaps.

Just one thing I recommend: don't go to #wordpress @freenode looking for
help. While #debian (and #tcl and #dokuwiki and many other chans) are
full of kind, compassionate, helpful people, if you go to #wordpress
expecting such treatment, you will be sorely disappointed.
All you're likely to get there is, first "don't use Debian packages"
(okay, I say the same thing, shame on me), and second,"I'll help you for
$80/hour". Seriously.
Of course, I don't begrudge anyone a living, but it just seems terribly
mercenary in there. (I might add, I've been permanently banned from that
channel...so maybe I'm biased)

tony
--
http://www.tonybaldwin.me
all tony, all the time!
3F330C6E
 
Old 06-19-2012, 09:18 AM
Chris Davies
 
Default wordpress/apache

Tony Baldwin <tony@tonybaldwin.org> wrote:
> As far as "just work", this is generally the case for a lot of stuff,
> but for a web application, you have to consider that not everyone wants
> to use only wordpress as their webroot, which is why such things are
> left to the user to configure, rather than automagical.

I agree with you that it's good that Debian doesn't constrain my
solution space. What threw me (although I can't speak for the OP)
was my expectation from other web related packages that there would be
something like "http://localhost//wordpress/" ready and waiting for me
to customise. Yes, it's easy to add but when someone is unfamiliar with
an application, the easier the better. ("/wordpress/" is clearly not the
best of choices for a production installation, but who in their right
mind would install Wordpress - or any other complex application for
that matter - into a production instance without having first learned
at least something about it?)


> Most web applications I install from upstream sources [...]
> I just install them where I want them somewhere in the webroot
> (/var/www/somesubdir).

I tend to install under /home/www/vHost/docroot/ rather than under
/var/www, as it means I get to keep my log files near my vHosts (/logs
instead of /docroot) and I can transfer the vHost in its entirely fairly
cleanly to another host. Re upstream sources vs Debian, I tend to prefer
the Debian approach as it fits with my system(s) cleanly. But there is
always a place for a vanilla upstream install. I run Debian's Apache,
MySQL, Perl, and PHP for instance, as they work. But I customise the
Apache configuration within individual vHosts quite heavily.


> I always run Stable on servers, and packages can end up two years old,

Likewise, except I often add backports for newer features that I really
want.


> It's funny, I stick with stable for the server os, but run apps on the
> bleeding development edge from git repos all the time, now.

Not really. One just hurts if it breaks, and the other is potentially
professional stupidity. You have restorable backups, of course...?

Thanks for the tips
Chris


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: sos5b9x88c.ln2@news.roaima.co.uk">http://lists.debian.org/sos5b9x88c.ln2@news.roaima.co.uk
 
Old 06-20-2012, 07:40 PM
Tony Baldwin
 
Default wordpress/apache

On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 10:18:52AM +0100, Chris Davies wrote:
> Tony Baldwin <tony@tonybaldwin.org> wrote:
> > As far as "just work", this is generally the case for a lot of stuff,
> > but for a web application, you have to consider that not everyone wants
> > to use only wordpress as their webroot, which is why such things are
> > left to the user to configure, rather than automagical.
>
> I agree with you that it's good that Debian doesn't constrain my
> solution space. What threw me (although I can't speak for the OP)
> was my expectation from other web related packages that there would be
> something like "http://localhost//wordpress/" ready and waiting for me
> to customise. Yes, it's easy to add but when someone is unfamiliar with
> an application, the easier the better. ("/wordpress/" is clearly not the
> best of choices for a production installation, but who in their right
> mind would install Wordpress - or any other complex application for
> that matter - into a production instance without having first learned
> at least something about it?)
>
>
> > Most web applications I install from upstream sources [...]
> > I just install them where I want them somewhere in the webroot
> > (/var/www/somesubdir).
>
> I tend to install under /home/www/vHost/docroot/ rather than under
> /var/www, as it means I get to keep my log files near my vHosts (/logs
> instead of /docroot) and I can transfer the vHost in its entirely fairly
> cleanly to another host. Re upstream sources vs Debian, I tend to prefer
> the Debian approach as it fits with my system(s) cleanly. But there is
> always a place for a vanilla upstream install. I run Debian's Apache,
> MySQL, Perl, and PHP for instance, as they work. But I customise the
> Apache configuration within individual vHosts quite heavily.
>

Yes, some stuff I install somewhere in /home (often creating distinct
users for this), but I then symlink them in /var/www.
I don't think it's necessarily better, but works for me.
I will do this when, for instance, I have a test server here at home
that used to be a desktop. The /home partition is a lot bigger than the
/root (some 150gb hdd, with like 20gb / and 120ish /home), so there's
more space for stuff.

Also, I do use the debian packages for apache, mysql and php,
just stuff like wiki, blog, etc. (dokuwiki, wordpress, whatever),
I often find are easilier installed and managed from the upstream
sources (and stay more uptodate, although you do have to be careful
about incompatibilitlies with our older pkgs, like php, or whatever).

> > I always run Stable on servers, and packages can end up two years old,
>
> Likewise, except I often add backports for newer features that I really
> want.
>
>
> > It's funny, I stick with stable for the server os, but run apps on the
> > bleeding development edge from git repos all the time, now.
>
> Not really. One just hurts if it breaks, and the other is potentially
> professional stupidity. You have restorable backups, of course...?

always have backups!

./tony
--
http://www.tonybaldwin.me
all tony, all the time!
3F330C6E
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 10:41 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org