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Old 04-19-2012, 08:39 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

Regid Ichira wrote:
> I had difficulties getting ssh(1)'s ESCAPE CHARACTERS to be recognized
> from within a login shell over ssh. In particular, sometimes the escape
> character was not recognized as such.

Can you provide an example? I have never had the ssh escape character
not be recognized. I often use it.

> I was able to find in gmane a similar issue for a Gentoo user from a
> few years ago. I don't have that gmane URL handy.
> Do you find the below patch acceptable?

> +With a login shell, one might issue a single new line character to prepare
> +the correct conditions for ssh to catch the escape character.

I find the existing sentence "The escape character must always follow
a newline to be interpreted as special." to be concise and
descriptive. It will be hard to improve upon it. Your addition here
seems to be "muddy". Plus third party phrasing "one might issue"
isn't in the same voice as the original.

But what is special about a login shell? There isn't anything special
about it that I can tell. Therefore I think the statement is wrong.

> +If the escape character is cought by the remote application, perhaps
> +it is echoed back by a login shell, then it will not affect the
> +underline ssh channel.

s/cought/caught/

Uhm, what? This is also incorrect. The escape character is consumed
by the ssh program and is not transmitted to the remote application.
The remote application won't read it. If the remote application does
read a tilde then it is only that the tilde was passed through
escaped in which case it was not an escape character.

> +Pressing the return key twice will close the command line after it
> +was started from a login shell.

Second, uhm, what? Please say a few more words about what you are
talking about here. I cannot understand it and it does not match how
ssh operates.

I think there must be some misunderstanding happening. Please
describe what you are seeing so that we can help work through it.

Bob
 
Old 04-19-2012, 11:22 PM
Jude DaShiell
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

Try hitting tilde followed by period and see what happens within an ssh
login shell. The tilde is the key to the left of the 1 key just
shifted.

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012, Regid Ichira wrote:

> I had difficulties getting ssh(1)'s ESCAPE CHARACTERS to be recognized
> from within a login shell over ssh. In particular, sometimes the escape
> character was not recognized as such. I was able to find in gmane a
> similar issue for a Gentoo user from a few years ago. I don't have
> that gmane URL handy.
> Do you find the below patch acceptable?
>
> --- a/usr/share/man/man1/ssh.1.gz 2012-04-19 21:47:00.933890166 +0300
> +++ b/usr/share/man/man1/ssh.1 2012-04-19 17:20:24.000000000 +0300
> @@ -866,6 +866,11 @@ A single tilde character can be sent as
> or by following the tilde by a character other than those described below.
> The escape character must always follow a newline to be interpreted as
> special.
> +With a login shell, one might issue a single new line character to prepare
> +the correct conditions for ssh to catch the escape character.
> +If the escape character is cought by the remote application, perhaps
> +it is echoed back by a login shell, then it will not affect the
> +underline ssh channel.
> The escape character can be changed in configuration files using the
> .Cm EscapeChar
> configuration directive or on the command line by the
> @@ -913,6 +918,8 @@ option is enabled in
> Basic help is available, using the
> .Fl h
> option.
> +Pressing the return key twice will close the command line after it
> +was started from a login shell.
> .It Cm ~R
> Request rekeying of the connection
> (only useful for SSH protocol version 2 and if the peer supports it).
>
>
>

----------------------------------------------------------------
Jude <jdashiel-at-shellworld-dot-net>
<http://www.shellworld.net/~jdashiel/nj.html>


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Old 04-20-2012, 08:34 AM
Darac Marjal
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

On Thu, Apr 19, 2012 at 07:22:17PM -0400, Jude DaShiell wrote:
> Try hitting tilde followed by period and see what happens within an ssh
> login shell. The tilde is the key to the left of the 1 key just
> shifted.

Maybe on YOUR keyboard it is. On mine, it's between the apostrophe key
(shift+' -> @) and Enter. On laptop keyboards, I suspect all bets are
off; it may be there, it might be tucked up at the top as a half-size
key, it might be only accessible as a Fn+something sequence.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 08:49 AM
Chris Davies
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

Jude DaShiell <jdashiel@shellworld.net> wrote:
> The tilde is the key to the left of the 1 key just shifted.

Not here, it isn't. It depends entirely on your keyboard and keyboard
map. Tilde is ~ and it has to be up to the OP to find where that is placed
(if at all).

Chris


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Old 04-20-2012, 10:11 AM
Lisi
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

On Friday 20 April 2012 00:22:17 Jude DaShiell wrote:
> Try hitting tilde followed by period and see what happens within an ssh
> login shell. *The tilde is the key to the left of the 1 key just
> shifted.

Not on my keyboard. To say where something is on a keyboard you need to
specify the keyboard. My guess would be USA, since I think that everyone
else would say. But even then, there are at least two, are there not?

Lisi


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Old 04-20-2012, 10:17 AM
Alberto Fuentes
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

I change often keyboard layouts between en and es...

the original keyboard layout of this machine is ES. If i try to press
the escape character while in EN, no matter if i press the original ES
positions or the new positions of ~ in EN, it does not work...


If I change to layout to the original of this computer (thats it, ES),
it works just fine...with the current positions of ES layout. i dont
really know what parts are implied in this problem, but maybe it helps
you to figure it out whats happening in your case


greets!
aL

On 19/04/12 21:50, Regid Ichira wrote:

I had difficulties getting ssh(1)'s ESCAPE CHARACTERS to be recognized
from within a login shell over ssh. In particular, sometimes the escape
character was not recognized as such. I was able to find in gmane a
similar issue for a Gentoo user from a few years ago. I don't have
that gmane URL handy.
Do you find the below patch acceptable?

--- a/usr/share/man/man1/ssh.1.gz 2012-04-19 21:47:00.933890166 +0300
+++ b/usr/share/man/man1/ssh.1 2012-04-19 17:20:24.000000000 +0300
@@ -866,6 +866,11 @@ A single tilde character can be sent as
or by following the tilde by a character other than those described below.
The escape character must always follow a newline to be interpreted as
special.
+With a login shell, one might issue a single new line character to prepare
+the correct conditions for ssh to catch the escape character.
+If the escape character is cought by the remote application, perhaps
+it is echoed back by a login shell, then it will not affect the
+underline ssh channel.
The escape character can be changed in configuration files using the
.Cm EscapeChar
configuration directive or on the command line by the
@@ -913,6 +918,8 @@ option is enabled in
Basic help is available, using the
.Fl h
option.
+Pressing the return key twice will close the command line after it
+was started from a login shell.
.It Cm ~R
Request rekeying of the connection
(only useful for SSH protocol version 2 and if the peer supports it).





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Old 04-20-2012, 10:42 AM
Alberto Fuentes
 
Default Working with ssh's escape character

On 20/04/12 12:17, Alberto Fuentes wrote:

I change often keyboard layouts between en and es...

the original keyboard layout of this machine is ES. If i try to press
the escape character while in EN, no matter if i press the original ES
positions or the new positions of ~ in EN, it does not work...


Ok, after skimming the docs a little, i noticed you have to press enter
before entering the escape character. It works with both layouts now


Also you can change the escape character to whatever you want in your
ssh_config very easily with EscapeChar ~


greets!
aL


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