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Old 03-25-2012, 11:07 PM
Paul E Condon
 
Default how to increase space for tmpfs /tmp ... OT question

On 20120325_010923, Stan Hoeppner wrote:
> On 3/24/2012 4:02 PM, Javier Vasquez wrote:
> > 2012/3/24 shirish शिरीष <shirishag75@gmail.com>:
>
> >> # TMPFS_SIZE: maximum size for all tmpfs filesystems if no specific
> >> # size is provided. If no value is provided here, the kernel default
> >> # will be used.
> >> TMPFS_SIZE=20%
> >
> > See, this is as you wish. This particular setting is the maximum for
> > ALL of the tmpfs space. Kind of the default if nothing else is
> > specified. You might not touch this if you don't want. So I would
> > not be afraid of using 100% of RAM here.
>
> That's probably not a smart idea:
>
> http://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/filesystems/tmpfs.txt
> ...
> tmpfs has three mount options for sizing:
>
> size: The limit of allocated bytes for this tmpfs instance. The
> default is half of your physical RAM without swap. If you
> oversize your tmpfs instances the machine will deadlock
> since the OOM handler will not be able to free that memory.
> ...
>
> The OP would likely be far better off simply mounting /tmp on his root
> filesystem as was always done in the past. Application developers
> writing to /tmp aren't expecting memory speed transfers of such files
> because of the traditional placement of /tmp. And he'll have more than
> enough space, many times his RAM quantity.
>
> FWIW, my Squeeze servers are all upgrades going back to Sarge, IIRC.
> Here's my /tmp setup:
>
> $ df /tmp
> Filesystem Type Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
> /dev/sda2 ext2 33G 3.8G 28G 12% /
>
> I'm sure some/many of you will gasp at that fact I still use EXT2. If
> it ain't broke, don't "fix" it. The /boot and root filesystems are on
> EXT2, with all data storage on XFS. Never had problems with EXT2 in
> this setup, so it lives on, for now.
>
> --
> Stan
>
>
> --
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> Archive: http://lists.debian.org/4F6EB693.30009@hardwarefreak.com
>

OK, Stan,

I'm convinced by your argument, but I'm not ready to switch to XFS and
ext2. My root partition is ext3 and contains plenty of space (~50GB)
for /tmp. Also, I have been being bothered by running out of space for
intermediate files during 'sort' of largish files. So, ... how do I
shut down tmpfs? On my plain vanilla wheezy tmpfs seems also to be
involved in something called rootfs which is in use. Do I have to
reboot to get rid of the tmpfs mount of /tmp? On this machine, I have
a 60GB partition that I have been using with the -T option in sort to
make it work again, but I can't make that partition BE mounted as /tmp
until I have umount-ed the tmpfs mount at /tmp. At least that is what
I think my problem is.

TIA
--
Paul E Condon
pecondon@mesanetworks.net


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Old 03-26-2012, 01:24 AM
Henrique de Moraes Holschuh
 
Default how to increase space for tmpfs /tmp ... OT question

On Sun, 25 Mar 2012, Paul E Condon wrote:
> > I'm sure some/many of you will gasp at that fact I still use EXT2. If
> > it ain't broke, don't "fix" it. The /boot and root filesystems are on
> > EXT2, with all data storage on XFS. Never had problems with EXT2 in
> > this setup, so it lives on, for now.

You are, of course, aware of the term "bit rot"?

ext2 is mostly unused nowadays, and it gets little attention and testing.
It depends heavily on the VFS layer pagecache, and other areas of the kernel
to work well. But THOSE areas are not staying put. So, ext2 *will* bit
rot.

> I'm convinced by your argument, but I'm not ready to switch to XFS and
> ext2. My root partition is ext3 and contains plenty of space (~50GB)

I advise you to not switch anything to ext2. XFS is fine, it is actively
developed, regression-tested, and heavily used everywhere. ext2 is not
(anymore).

--
"One disk to rule them all, One disk to find them. One disk to bring
them all and in the darkness grind them. In the Land of Redmond
where the shadows lie." -- The Silicon Valley Tarot
Henrique Holschuh


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