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Old 11-05-2011, 05:51 PM
T o n g
 
Default special device does not exist

Hi,

I'm having a very weird problem.

% mount /dev/sdb7 /mnt/tmp
mount: special device /dev/sdb7 does not exist

I.e., my sdb7 is not in my system's device list. But the partition does
exist:

$ fdisk -l /dev/sdb | grep sdb7
/dev/sdb7 15300 17848 20474842 83 Linux

And this is from 'cfdisk /dev/sdb'

Name Flags Part Type FS Type [Label] Size (MB)
-----------------------------------------------------
. . .
sdb7 NC Logical Linux 20966.24
sdb8 NC Logical Linux ext3 [os21] 6292.34
sdb9 NC Logical Linux ext3 [os22] 6292.34
. . .

Actually, it is not only sdb7 that is missing from my system's device
list but many others as well, including sdb8 & sdb9, which all show fine
in fdisk, sfdisk, or cfdisk. Just that they are not there:

$ ls -l /dev/sdb?
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 17 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb1
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 18 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb2
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 21 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb5
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 22 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb6

This is after I'll issued the 'udevadm trigger' for udev to update my
system's device list.

I've tried to recreate the device myself:

mknod -m 660 /dev/sdb7 b 8 23

$ ls -l /dev/sdb*
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 16 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 17 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb1
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 27 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb11
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 29 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb13
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 30 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb14
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 31 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb15
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 18 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb2
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 21 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb5
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 22 2011-11-05 14:10 /dev/sdb6
brw-r--r-- 1 root root 8, 23 2011-11-05 14:14 /dev/sdb7

But somehow it is not working:

% mkfs.ext3 -v /dev/sdb7
mke2fs 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)
mkfs.ext3: No such device or address while trying to determine filesystem
size

Please help.

Thanks

--
Tong (remove underscore(s) to reply)
http://xpt.sourceforge.net/techdocs/
http://xpt.sourceforge.net/tools/


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Old 11-05-2011, 07:22 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default special device does not exist

T o n g wrote:
> I.e., my sdb7 is not in my system's device list. But the partition does
> exist:

Did you recently change the partition table on that device? That will
sometimes cause the kernel to be out of sync with the device.

You can trigger the Linux kernel to re-read the partition tables by
using a few different tools. One of them is partprobe from the parted
package.

# apt-get install parted

# partprobe /dev/sdb

Bob
 
Old 11-06-2011, 01:35 AM
T o n g
 
Default special device does not exist

On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 14:22:22 -0600, Bob Proulx wrote:

>> I.e., my sdb7 is not in my system's device list. But the partition does
>> exist:
>
> Did you recently change the partition table on that device? That will
> sometimes cause the kernel to be out of sync with the device.

Bingo!

I remember it was a "long" time ago that I changed the partition. But
apparently it is not long enough to beat my last reboot:

$ uptime
22:12:19 up 72 days, 23:22, 18 users, load average: 0.47, 0.35, 0.31

The box has been running steady for so long that I've forgot which one
came first.

Thanks for the answer. AOK now.

--
Tong (remove underscore(s) to reply)
http://xpt.sourceforge.net/techdocs/
http://xpt.sourceforge.net/tools/


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Old 11-06-2011, 06:40 AM
Chen Wei
 
Default special device does not exist

On Sun, Nov 06, 2011 at 02:35:57AM +0000, T o n g wrote:
> > Did you recently change the partition table on that device? That will
> > sometimes cause the kernel to be out of sync with the device.
>
> Bingo!
>
> I remember it was a "long" time ago that I changed the partition. But
> apparently it is not long enough to beat my last reboot:
>
I found UUID makes life easier.


--
Chen Wei


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Old 11-06-2011, 06:56 AM
Bob Proulx
 
Default special device does not exist

Chen Wei wrote:
> T o n g wrote:
> > Bob Proulx wrote:
> > > Did you recently change the partition table on that device? That will
> > > sometimes cause the kernel to be out of sync with the device.
> >
> > Bingo!
> >
> > I remember it was a "long" time ago that I changed the partition. But
> > apparently it is not long enough to beat my last reboot:
>
> I found UUID makes life easier.

UUIDs have nothing to do with the Linux kernel being in sync with the
device's partition table. The UUIDs come into action afterward.

Bob
 
Old 11-06-2011, 06:27 PM
Doug
 
Default special device does not exist

On 11/06/2011 02:56 AM, Bob Proulx wrote:

Chen Wei wrote:

T o n g wrote:

Bob Proulx wrote:

Did you recently change the partition table on that device? That will
sometimes cause the kernel to be out of sync with the device.


Bingo!

I remember it was a "long" time ago that I changed the partition. But
apparently it is not long enough to beat my last reboot:


I found UUID makes life easier.


UUIDs have nothing to do with the Linux kernel being in sync with the
device's partition table. The UUIDs come into action afterward.

Bob

Is there a Unix/Linux command to determine the uuids of your devices?
--doug

--
Blessed are the peacemakers...for they shall be shot at from both sides.
--A. M. Greeley



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Old 11-06-2011, 06:38 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default special device does not exist

Doug wrote:
> Is there a Unix/Linux command to determine the uuids of your devices?

The standard command is:

# blkid

The blkid command needs root since by default it (annoyingly) caches
information in /etc/blkid.tab. (Cache info should go into /var/cache.)

You can use ls (as a normal user) to poke around in the /dev/disk/
filesystem to get the information directly.

$ ls -log /dev/disk/by-*

Bob
 

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