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Stephen Powell 10-02-2011 12:09 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 19:22:31 -0400 (EDT), Lisi wrote:
> On Saturday 01 October 2011 23:23:10 Liam O'Toole wrote:
>> On 2011-10-01, Ralf Mardorf <ralf.mardorf@alice-dsl.net> wrote:
>>> Sorry, I was pissed.
>>
>> In the British or the American sense? It's hard to tell.
>
> I didn't know that the American sense existed.

And I didn't know that the British sense existed.

Amazing, isn't it? Two cultures divided by a common language.

A sign seen at a restaurant in England says, "Football coaches
not admitted unless booked in advance". What does that mean?
An American who sees that sign scratches his head and thinks,
"What do these people have against Joe Paterno?" He doesn't
realize that "football coach" means "soccer bus". Even when we
use the same words, they mean different things. In England,
"tea" means a full meal. An American thinks that "tea" must
be the British equivalent of a coffee break, except that they
drink tea instead of coffee.

By the way "really mad" to an American means "really angry",
not "really crazy", just in case you didn't know.

--
.'`. Stephen Powell
: :' :
`. `'`
`-


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Lisi 10-02-2011 12:44 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sunday 02 October 2011 01:09:16 Stephen Powell wrote:
> In England,
> "tea" means a full meal.

Sorry to contradict you, but this is inaccurate. I don't know how the numbers
pan out percentage-wise, since the use of tea in that sense is both regional
and class based. (Yes, that terrible British class system.)

In the middle classes in the south, and the upper classes everywhere in
England, tea means a cup of tea in the afternoon, perhaps with biscuits
and/or cake etc. Cream tea means, I think everywhere in England, a pot of
tea and scones with cream and strawberry jam, consumed in the afternoon.

In offices and certainly some factories, we have a tea break in the afternoon
and a coffee break in the morning.

I simply don't know how this pans out in Scotland, Wales and Ireland, but you
rescued me from needing to know by specifically speaking of England! I am
not quibbling - there are distinct cultural differences between the nations.

I just asked my granddaughter what meal she would mean by tea and she
said "What meal? There isn't a meal called tea." So it hasn't yet changed
and is still used as I have described above.

Sorry - language fascinates me!

Lisi


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Weaver 10-02-2011 12:51 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sat, 1 Oct 2011 20:09:16 -0400 (EDT)
Stephen Powell <zlinuxman@wowway.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 19:22:31 -0400 (EDT), Lisi wrote:
> > On Saturday 01 October 2011 23:23:10 Liam O'Toole wrote:
> >> On 2011-10-01, Ralf Mardorf <ralf.mardorf@alice-dsl.net> wrote:
> >>> Sorry, I was pissed.
> >>
> >> In the British or the American sense? It's hard to tell.
> >
> > I didn't know that the American sense existed.
>
> And I didn't know that the British sense existed.
>
> Amazing, isn't it? Two cultures divided by a common language.
>
> A sign seen at a restaurant in England says, "Football coaches
> not admitted unless booked in advance". What does that mean?
> An American who sees that sign scratches his head and thinks,
> "What do these people have against Joe Paterno?" He doesn't
> realize that "football coach" means "soccer bus". Even when we
> use the same words, they mean different things. In England,
> "tea" means a full meal. An American thinks that "tea" must
> be the British equivalent of a coffee break, except that they
> drink tea instead of coffee.
>
> By the way "really mad" to an American means "really angry",
> not "really crazy", just in case you didn't know.
>

This issue gets revisited on this list from time to time.
It's all rather simple really!
English is a language and 'American English' is a dialect.
Dialects, from time to time, have a way of becoming possessed of
delusions of grandeur and, believing that there is an opportunity for
world domination, create initiatives such as making it the default for
Operating System installations and ongoing processing.

The truly learned, educated and experienced sit back in their
observations and smile fondly at this adolescent symptomology,
understanding that the personalities involved will, in time, return
to their roots once the first signs of identity crisis set in.

Be assured that we will be waiting patiently for that occasion and will
welcome the prodigal's return with open arms and the requisite
re-education process.
Regards,

Weaver.

--
"In a world without walls and fences,
what need have we for Windows or Gates?"
-Anon.


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Stephen Powell 10-02-2011 01:17 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 20:44:41 -0400 (EDT), Lisi wrote:
> On Sunday 02 October 2011 01:09:16 Stephen Powell wrote:
>> In England, "tea" means a full meal.
>
> Sorry to contradict you, but this is inaccurate.
> ...

Hmm. Maybe that's Australia I was thinking of and I got
the two countries mixed up. Anyway, though I was mistaken
on one point, you proved my larger point. The same words
sometimes mean different things to different countries,
or even to sub-cultures within a country, even though all
involved claim to speak "English".

P.S. Don't ask for a napkin at a restaurant in Australia.
You'll get very strange looks! Ask for a serviette.
To them, a napkin is, um, well, never mind.

--
.'`. Stephen Powell
: :' :
`. `'`
`-


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Weaver 10-02-2011 01:39 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sat, 1 Oct 2011 21:17:08 -0400 (EDT)
Stephen Powell <zlinuxman@wowway.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 20:44:41 -0400 (EDT), Lisi wrote:
> > On Sunday 02 October 2011 01:09:16 Stephen Powell wrote:
> >> In England, "tea" means a full meal.
> >
> > Sorry to contradict you, but this is inaccurate.
> > ...
>
> Hmm. Maybe that's Australia I was thinking of and I got
> the two countries mixed up. Anyway, though I was mistaken
> on one point, you proved my larger point. The same words
> sometimes mean different things to different countries,
> or even to sub-cultures within a country, even though all
> involved claim to speak "English".
>
> P.S. Don't ask for a napkin at a restaurant in Australia.
> You'll get very strange looks! Ask for a serviette.
> To them, a napkin is, um, well, never mind.
>

Not too far out.
The different teas are: morning tea, which is mid-morning; afternoon
tea - mid-afternoon; Devonshire tea, which is usually with whipped
cream rather than the original Devonshire clotted cream, because it's
not available elsewhere and can be had at any time of day; and
'high-tea' which is a formal tea and in association with a light
meal predominated by cakes and pastries. I believe this latter to be
a translation of the german Kaffeklatszche (spelling?) that was
introduced through Prince Albert and his chefs.
Regards,

Weaver.

--
"In a world without walls and fences,
what need have we for Windows or Gates?"
-Anon.


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Weaver 10-02-2011 01:41 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sun, 2 Oct 2011 11:39:29 +1000
Weaver <weaver@riseup.net> wrote:

> On Sat, 1 Oct 2011 21:17:08 -0400 (EDT)
> Stephen Powell <zlinuxman@wowway.com> wrote:
>
> > On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 20:44:41 -0400 (EDT), Lisi wrote:
> > > On Sunday 02 October 2011 01:09:16 Stephen Powell wrote:
> > >> In England, "tea" means a full meal.
> > >
> > > Sorry to contradict you, but this is inaccurate.
> > > ...
> >
> > Hmm. Maybe that's Australia I was thinking of and I got
> > the two countries mixed up. Anyway, though I was mistaken
> > on one point, you proved my larger point. The same words
> > sometimes mean different things to different countries,
> > or even to sub-cultures within a country, even though all
> > involved claim to speak "English".
> >
> > P.S. Don't ask for a napkin at a restaurant in Australia.
> > You'll get very strange looks! Ask for a serviette.
> > To them, a napkin is, um, well, never mind.
> >
>
> Not too far out.
> The different teas are: morning tea, which is mid-morning; afternoon
> tea - mid-afternoon; Devonshire tea, which is usually with whipped
> cream rather than the original Devonshire clotted cream, because it's
> not available elsewhere and can be had at any time of day; and
> 'high-tea' which is a formal tea and in association with a light
> meal predominated by cakes and pastries. I believe this latter to be
> a translation of the german Kaffeklatszche (spelling?) that was
> introduced through Prince Albert and his chefs.
> Regards,
>
> Weaver.
>

The jam with Devonshire teas is also raspberry, not strawberry.

--
"In a world without walls and fences,
what need have we for Windows or Gates?"
-Anon.


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Tom Furie 10-02-2011 02:10 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sun, Oct 02, 2011 at 01:44:41AM +0100, Lisi wrote:
> On Sunday 02 October 2011 01:09:16 Stephen Powell wrote:
> > In England, "tea" means a full meal.
>
> Sorry to contradict you, but this is inaccurate. I don't know how the
> numbers pan out percentage-wise, since the use of tea in that sense is
> both regional and class based. (Yes, that terrible British class
> system.)

> I simply don't know how this pans out in Scotland, Wales and Ireland,

Up here, north of the border, it also varies by region and class. In
this "neck of the woods" the meals I might have in a day are breakfast
in the morning, lunch around noon, dinner in the evening and supper as a
snack before bed. In other areas the evening meal might be referred to
as supper or tea.

When I was living in the north of England those meals would have been
referred to as breakfast, dinner, tea and supper.

Cheers,
Tom

--
Sex is like air. It's only a big deal if you can't get any.

Ralf Mardorf 10-02-2011 03:06 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sun, 2011-10-02 at 01:44 +0100, Lisi wrote:
> On Sunday 02 October 2011 01:09:16 Stephen Powell wrote:
> > In England,
> > "tea" means a full meal.
>
> Sorry to contradict you, but this is inaccurate. I don't know how the numbers
> pan out percentage-wise, since the use of tea in that sense is both regional
> and class based. (Yes, that terrible British class system.)
>
> In the middle classes in the south, and the upper classes everywhere in
> England, tea means a cup of tea in the afternoon, perhaps with biscuits
> and/or cake etc. Cream tea means, I think everywhere in England, a pot of
> tea and scones with cream and strawberry jam, consumed in the afternoon.
>
> In offices and certainly some factories, we have a tea break in the afternoon
> and a coffee break in the morning.
>
> I simply don't know how this pans out in Scotland, Wales and Ireland, but you
> rescued me from needing to know by specifically speaking of England! I am
> not quibbling - there are distinct cultural differences between the nations.
>
> I just asked my granddaughter what meal she would mean by tea and she
> said "What meal? There isn't a meal called tea." So it hasn't yet changed
> and is still used as I have described above.
>
> Sorry - language fascinates me!
>
> Lisi

"1) To be extremely angry

2) To be heavily intoxicated with alcohol to the point of not knowing
where you are." http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pissed

I had more than just one beer, no tea ;), but I did know where I were. I
was extremely angry. Anyway, I misbehaved, but I should switch back to
Thunderbird aka Icedove ASAP.

Sorry again,

Ralf





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Ralf Mardorf 10-02-2011 04:23 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
On Sun, 2011-10-02 at 11:39 +1000, Weaver wrote:
> Kaffeklatszche (spelling?)

The spelling is Kaffeeklatsch, it should be an English word too
http://www.dict.cc/?s=Kaffeeklatsch

Btw.
http://www.dict.cc/?s=Rucksack
and
http://www.dict.cc/?s=Kindergarten
are some German words that are part of the English language.

1 Kind
2 Kinder
and not 2 Kinders

1 child
2 children
and not to childs or childrens

but it's common that Germans say "Kinders"


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Ralf Mardorf 10-02-2011 04:31 AM

British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)
 
-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: Ralf Mardorf <ralf.mardorf@alice-dsl.net>
To: Weaver <weaver@riseup.net>
Subject: Re: [OT] British vs. American English (was Re: Wow, Evolution
left me with eggs in my face)
Date: Sun, 02 Oct 2011 06:14:15 +0200

On Sun, 2011-10-02 at 10:51 +1000, Weaver wrote:

> This issue gets revisited on this list from time to time.
> It's all rather simple really!
> English is a language and 'American English' is a dialect.
> Dialects, from time to time, have a way of becoming possessed of
> delusions of grandeur and, believing that there is an opportunity for
> world domination, create initiatives such as making it the default for
> Operating System installations and ongoing processing.

I suspect that it becomes default for OS is related to the two companies
"Apfel" and "Winzigweich" that are from the USA. Germans learn British
English, just for kids it's cool to use US English, but since it's not
our native language, we're mixing both English + adding some German
habits.


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