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Old 10-02-2011, 04:58 PM
Stephen Powell
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 10:58:01 -0400 (EDT), consul tores wrote:
>
> United States of America. Does "of" tell you something?
>
> i am from El Salvador of America, but we do not take "America" only
> for us; maybe it is related to common sense! or maybe low knowledge of
> Geography. it is the same with North America without Mexico.

You're right. United States of America is the full name of
the country. But we tend to be lazy and shorten it. USA
is shorter still. But it does not lend itself to alternate
forms. For example, would I tell someone that I am an USAian?
It doesn't work. American flows off the tongue much better.
But taking America in the larger sense, meaning North America,
Central America, and South America combined, you are, in that
sense, an American also.

You can say you are an El Salvadorian. But what can I say that
I am? A United States of American? It just doesn't flow at all.
It's quite awkward. So what do I call myself then? Calling
ourselves Americans is not technically correct, using the larger
sense of the word American, but it's apparently the best we
can come up with.

--
.'`. Stephen Powell
: :' :
`. `'`
`-


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Old 10-02-2011, 05:17 PM
Camaleón
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 12:58:16 -0400, Stephen Powell wrote:

> On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 10:58:01 -0400 (EDT), consul tores wrote:
>>
>> United States of America. Does "of" tell you something?
>>
>> i am from El Salvador of America, but we do not take "America" only for
>> us; maybe it is related to common sense! or maybe low knowledge of
>> Geography. it is the same with North America without Mexico.
>
> You're right. United States of America is the full name of the country.
> But we tend to be lazy and shorten it. USA is shorter still. But it
> does not lend itself to alternate forms. For example, would I tell
> someone that I am an USAian? It doesn't work. American flows off the
> tongue much better. But taking America in the larger sense, meaning
> North America, Central America, and South America combined, you are, in
> that sense, an American also.
>
> You can say you are an El Salvadorian. But what can I say that I am? A
> United States of American? It just doesn't flow at all. It's quite
> awkward. So what do I call myself then? Calling ourselves Americans is
> not technically correct, using the larger sense of the word American,
> but it's apparently the best we can come up with.

:-)

The mess comes from the gentilic we (Spanish speaking users) use for
"American" people (i.e., United States inhabitants). The proper way to
call them in Spanish is "estadounidenses" (plural form), which refers
specifically to the country, not the whole continent.

But it seems that in English the correct demonym for USA people is indeed
"Americans".

Greetings,

--
Camaleón


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Old 10-02-2011, 07:02 PM
Doug
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On 10/02/2011 04:34 AM, Terence wrote:

On 2 October 2011 01:44, Lisi<lisi.reisz@gmail.com> wrote:


I just asked my granddaughter what meal she would mean by tea and she
said "What meal? There isn't a meal called tea." So it hasn't yet changed
and is still used as I have described above.

Sorry - language fascinates me!


And me. Down here in Devon "Tea" as a meal is as you say, with such
food as bread and butter, scones and cream, sandwiches etc.. "High
tea", on the other hand consists of a hot course, but of a lesser
quantity than a dinner or a supper meal. Perhaps soup, baked beans or
sardines on toast, or even ham and eggs. I remember fondly high tea
with my great aunt with fresh cod roe on toast.....

/snip/


Another interesting thing (at least to me) is the distinction between
"dinner" and "supper". Does one dine or sup in the evening (I am
assuming that no one on the list would have "dinner" mid-day!). In my
experience it would seem that the usage depends on the formality of
the occasion, with dinner being the more formal.



When I was a child in the US, my mother, who was descended from the
folks who landed here in the 1700s, insisted on having Sunday
dinner at about 1PM. I never knew anyone else who did that, but
I never knew anyone else who was descended from the colonists.
(One of my ancestors almost became the second Vice-President.)

--doug

/snip/


--
Blessed are the peacemakers...for they shall be shot at from both sides. --A. M. Greeley


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Old 10-02-2011, 09:02 PM
Terence
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On 2 October 2011 20:02, Doug <dmcgarrett@optonline.net> wrote:

> When I was a child in the US, my mother, who was descended from the
> folks who landed here in the 1700s, insisted on having Sunday
> dinner at about 1PM. *I never knew anyone else who did that, but
> I never knew anyone else who was descended from the colonists.
> (One of my ancestors almost became the second Vice-President.)

That would probably be a tradition based upon UK habit of the time. It
would follow the normal practice of morning church service followed by
a full family meal so those who had miles to walk home could do so in
daylight. Here in Devon it can still take a time to get to church even
in the age of mechanised transport!

BTW what is/was the second vice?

Terence


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Old 10-02-2011, 09:48 PM
Eike Lantzsch
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On Sunday 02 October 2011 12:19:26 Lisi wrote:
> On Sunday 02 October 2011 15:58:01 consul tores wrote:
> > i am from El Salvador of America, but we do not take "America" only
> > for us; maybe it is related to common sense! or maybe low knowledge of
> > Geography. it is the same with North America without Mexico.
>
> I agree, consul tores and try to remember to say either the USofA or the
> USA when meaning that country. But I have never found an acceptable way
> for saying that someone is a native of that country. Citizen of the USofA
> perhaps?? Maybe we should coin an adjective. USian perhaps?
>
> Lisi
> (Who once spent 6 weeks in America, but has never been to the USA.)
6 weeks - you're tough! Or was it Canada?

Well, there is "estadounidense" as being part of "americano". That is a
courteous way of discerning them - as opposed to "yankee", which isn't polite
and striclty speaking does not apply to, lets say e.g. Texans.
Here for conciseness, Spanish got it.
Funny when I hear "when I go to America ..." - hey, you ARE in America, just
on the southern part of the continent. Mentioning it gets me blank stares -
mostly. South-Americans however do grin.

Eike

--
Eike Lantzsch ZP6CGE
Casilla de Correo 1519
1209 Asuncion / Paraguay




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Old 10-02-2011, 10:09 PM
Hilco Wijbenga
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On 2 October 2011 08:47, consul tores <consultores1@gmail.com> wrote:
> Canadians use "native" and USians "indians" i think; we say
> "indigenous"; and in general American natives or ancestors.

Actually, no, we (Canadians) call them "First Nations" (or, at least,
that's the PC term). It does have a nice ring to it. And it makes more
sense than "native" since humans aren't really native to any place
(check your history books for how humans spread across the globe).

And in the US (nowadays), it's "Native Americans". Calling them
Indians was always silly as Indians live in India. :-)

My, my, the things discussed on this list... :-)


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Old 10-02-2011, 10:40 PM
Lisi
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On Sunday 02 October 2011 17:35:05 consul tores wrote:
> yes, i understood it in that way, but i add it for the list.

Ah. Sorry! Wise of you I think.

Lisi


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Old 10-02-2011, 11:51 PM
Liam O'Toole
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On 2011-10-02, Camaleón <noelamac@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 12:58:16 -0400, Stephen Powell wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 10:58:01 -0400 (EDT), consul tores wrote:
>>>
>>> United States of America. Does "of" tell you something?
>>>
>>> i am from El Salvador of America, but we do not take "America" only for
>>> us; maybe it is related to common sense! or maybe low knowledge of
>>> Geography. it is the same with North America without Mexico.
>>
>> You're right. United States of America is the full name of the country.
>> But we tend to be lazy and shorten it. USA is shorter still. But it
>> does not lend itself to alternate forms. For example, would I tell
>> someone that I am an USAian? It doesn't work. American flows off the
>> tongue much better. But taking America in the larger sense, meaning
>> North America, Central America, and South America combined, you are, in
>> that sense, an American also.
>>
>> You can say you are an El Salvadorian. But what can I say that I am? A
>> United States of American? It just doesn't flow at all. It's quite
>> awkward. So what do I call myself then? Calling ourselves Americans is
>> not technically correct, using the larger sense of the word American,
>> but it's apparently the best we can come up with.
>
>:-)
>
> The mess comes from the gentilic we (Spanish speaking users) use for
> "American" people (i.e., United States inhabitants). The proper way to
> call them in Spanish is "estadounidenses" (plural form), which refers
> specifically to the country, not the whole continent.
>
> But it seems that in English the correct demonym for USA people is indeed
> "Americans".
>

Yes, that is the common usage in English. Much to the irritation of
Canadians, Mexicans, and many others.

--
Liam O'Toole
Cork, Ireland


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Old 10-03-2011, 05:16 AM
consul tores
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

2011/10/2 Hilco Wijbenga <hilco.wijbenga@gmail.com>:
> On 2 October 2011 08:47, consul tores <consultores1@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Canadians use "native" and USians "indians" i think; we say
>> "indigenous"; and in general American natives or ancestors.
>
> Actually, no, we (Canadians) call them "First Nations" (or, at least,
> that's the PC term). It does have a nice ring to it. And it makes more
> sense than "native" since humans aren't really native to any place
> (check your history books for how humans spread across the globe).
>
> And in the US (nowadays), it's "Native Americans". Calling them
> Indians was always silly as Indians live in India. :-)
>
> My, my, the things discussed on this list... :-)

Yes, it is absolutely correct, "Fist Nations", seems for me the most
appropriated term; thanks.


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Old 10-03-2011, 10:45 AM
Ralf Mardorf
 
Default British vs. American English (was Wow, Evolution left me with eggs in my face)

On Sun, 2011-10-02 at 08:43 -0400, Stephen Powell wrote:
> On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 05:56:57 -0400 (EDT), Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> >
> > I'm not sure what M$ does mean , but I'm sure "Winzigweich" is the
> > same as M$ .
>
> M$ means Microsoft. Microsoft is often abbreviated as MS, such as in
> the term "MS-DOS". You can probably guess why the $ is sometimes
> substituted for the S.

I was kidding , since I'm a dino I know "MS-DOS", on my Atari ST 80286
hardware emulater I used "DR-DOS" instead of the M$ thingy.

- Ralf



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