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Old 05-09-2011, 09:57 AM
Tony van der Hoff
 
Default Disk Space Issues

On 09/05/11 10:48, Daniel Linux wrote:

What you would do after you found a full filesystem? It is just a
general question that was asked in my class of operating systems and
nobody had an answer.


This is the only full solution:
sudo rm -rf /


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Old 05-09-2011, 10:05 AM
Andrew McGlashan
 
Default Disk Space Issues

Hi Lisi,

Lisi wrote:

On Monday 09 May 2011 09:48:44 Daniel Linux wrote:

What you would do after you found a full filesystem? It is just a general
question that was asked in my class of operating systems and nobody had an
answer.


I currently have this problem on two of my disks. As I see it, I have 3
realistic choices: delete enough stuff to free up a realistic percentage if
the disks; buy myself 2 new larger disks; and copy a large chunk of stuff I
want to keep, but only need rarely, onto another (external?) disk. I am
trying the last first, and have bought an external drive. But I haven't yet
done it, and may not succeed in moving enough!


Don't count on an external drive surviving. If the data is important to
you, then you might want multiple external drives and have one of them
off-site -- perhaps swap with a family member or colleague?


Data is usually best on some form of protective RAID (not striping
unless mirrored as well) -- I am preferring RAID6 if I have enough
drives [6+ makes it worthwhile], RAID1 next and as a third choice,
RAID5. But don't forget ... RAID in itself is *NOT* a backup, it simply
protects against single [up to 2 drives with RAID6] drive failure.


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AndrewM

Andrew McGlashan
Broadband Solutions now including VoIP


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Old 05-09-2011, 10:15 AM
Andrew McGlashan
 
Default Disk Space Issues

Hi,

Daniel Linux wrote:

Can anybody tell me the steps to troubleshoot disk space issues.


Depending on the size of the file system to start with, you cold use
find as follows to locate larger files for consideration.


# find /home -size +10M -ls

Generally, larger files once identified can give you a good start.

However, that's just a start ... as others have said, a better
predefinition of the problem would help.


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Old 05-09-2011, 11:04 AM
Darac Marjal
 
Default Disk Space Issues

On Mon, May 09, 2011 at 04:59:40AM -0400, Brad Alexander wrote:
> Depends. Best case, you built your system using LVM and have reserved
> space. You can check this using the df command. If your filesystems start
> with /dev/mapper, then you are using LVM. You can check for free space
> using the vgdisplay command (as root):
>
> # vgdisplay
> ...Snip...
> * Alloc PE / Size****** 96637 / 377.49 GiB
> * Free* PE / Size****** 80065 / 312.75 GiB
>
> The free PE/Size line shows you the available space. You could then extend
> the filesystem that is having issues:
>
> # lvextend -L+10G /dev/VG00/foo

You probably want to add '-r' to that command to resize the filesystem
on the device, or else you'll need to also run
resize2fs/resize_reiserfs/xfs_growfs as appropriate.
 
Old 05-09-2011, 11:39 AM
Brad Alexander
 
Default Disk Space Issues

Yeah, good idea. Answering questions at 5am before coffee is contraindicated.

--b

On Mon, May 9, 2011 at 7:04 AM, Darac Marjal <mailinglist@darac.org.uk> wrote:

On Mon, May 09, 2011 at 04:59:40AM -0400, Brad Alexander wrote:

> * *Depends. Best case, you built your system using LVM and have reserved

> * *space. You can check this using the df command. If your filesystems start

> * *with /dev/mapper, then you are using LVM. You can check for free space

> * *using the vgdisplay command (as root):

>

> * *# vgdisplay

> * *...Snip...

> * ** Alloc PE / Size****** 96637 / 377.49 GiB

> * ** Free* PE / Size****** 80065 / 312.75 GiB

>

> * *The free PE/Size line shows you the available space. You could then extend

> * *the filesystem that is having issues:

>

> * *# lvextend -L+10G /dev/VG00/foo



You probably want to add '-r' to that command to resize the filesystem

on the device, or else you'll need to also run

resize2fs/resize_reiserfs/xfs_growfs as appropriate.
 
Old 05-09-2011, 01:56 PM
Lisi
 
Default Disk Space Issues

On Monday 09 May 2011 10:57:55 Tony van der Hoff wrote:
> On 09/05/11 10:48, Daniel Linux wrote:
> > What you would do after you found a full filesystem? It is just a
> > general question that was asked in my class of operating systems and
> > nobody had an answer.
>
> This is the only full solution:
> sudo rm -rf /

:-)

You don't think that that solution might bring other, worse problems in on its
tail?? ;-)

Lisi


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Old 05-09-2011, 03:41 PM
godo
 
Default Disk Space Issues

On 2011-05-09 10:48, Daniel Linux wrote:

What you would do after you found a full filesystem? It is just a
general question that was asked in my class of operating systems and
nobody had an answer.

Thanks,



Hi,
I'm not expert at all, but I will first check which directory is to large.
For example var can be to large because old logs or because something
create them rapidly. That happens to me and kernel and sys log was ~6GB
each!

Check tmp directory (system and user's); clean all garbage.

If everything is ok run to shop and by bigger hdd :-)

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Goran Dobosevic
Hrvatski: www.dobosevic.com
English: www.dobosevic.com/en/
Registered Linux User #503414


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Old 05-09-2011, 05:34 PM
Gilles Mocellin
 
Default Disk Space Issues

Le lundi 09 mai, Michiel Piscaer écrivit :

> Op 9-5-2011 10:48, Daniel Linux schreef:
> >What you would do after you found a full filesystem? It is just a
> >general question that was asked in my class of operating systems
> >and nobody had an answer.
> >
> >Thanks,
> >
> >On Mon, May 9, 2011 at 4:43 AM, Tom Grace
> ><lists-in@deathbycomputers.co.uk
> ><mailto:lists-in@deathbycomputers.co.uk>> wrote:
> >
> > On 09/05/11 09:40, Daniel Linux wrote:
> >
> > Yes, I need generic steps. After running df -h I know what
> > filesystem is almost full. What should I do?
> >
> > du -h /fullfilesystem is a good start, possibly with --max-depth
> > to limit the output.
> >
> >
> With # du -h --max-depth=1 you can find what directory is taking all
> of the space. Next is take the right action, by emtying / deleting
> the file, or moving the directory to an new disk.
[...]

Just to mention a useful ncurses tool to show and track space usage :
ncdu.
 
Old 05-10-2011, 07:28 AM
Tony van der Hoff
 
Default Disk Space Issues

On 09/05/11 15:56, Lisi wrote:

On Monday 09 May 2011 10:57:55 Tony van der Hoff wrote:

On 09/05/11 10:48, Daniel Linux wrote:

What you would do after you found a full filesystem? It is just
a general question that was asked in my class of operating
systems and nobody had an answer.


This is the only full solution: sudo rm -rf /


:-)

You don't think that that solution might bring other, worse problems
in on its tail?? ;-)



Sure, but that wasn't the question. This guy wants us to do his study
assignment for him, the correct answer to which is probably expected to
be at least one side of A4, and requires some thinking about.


I've made one simple suggestion; if he presents it to his prof, he'll
get all the marks he deserves



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Old 05-10-2011, 12:11 PM
"S.Allen"
 
Default Disk Space Issues

On Mon, May 09, 2011 at 07:34:56PM +0200, Gilles Mocellin wrote:
>
> Just to mention a useful ncurses tool to show and track space usage :
> ncdu.

Cool, thanks!



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