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Old 02-09-2008, 09:25 PM
Zach
 
Default Archiving audio (high fidelity)?

I would like to transfer my collection of LPs (record albums) and
audio cassette tapes onto optical media for archival.

I have a high end CD player and a medium end LP player and wonder
precisely how I can transfer these to DVD?

I would like to maintain the highest possible fidelity so even dumping
to .WAV or .FLAC is fine with me.

I have audio cables with gold plated connectors and my CD player is
connected to a powered amplifier.

Also I want to remove any cracks or pops from the LPs (especially)
before archiving.

What settings should my amplifier have (or the sound card) when I do this?

I have a relatively cheap sound card so what sound card would you
recommend for this project (it must be Linux friendly)?

I saw this USB device (apparently it uses a custom USB board to do the
D/A conversion with claimed high fidelity) Xitel Import Deluxe device
at Radio Shack:
http://www.xitel.com/USA/prod_inportdl.htm

But it only seems to save to MP3 and comes with MS Windows software only.

If you can be as specific as possible that would really help
(hardware, software, procedures, tips, etc.)

Regards,
Zach


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Old 02-09-2008, 11:59 PM
"Douglas A. Tutty"
 
Default Archiving audio (high fidelity)?

On Sat, Feb 09, 2008 at 05:25:55PM -0500, Zach wrote:
> I would like to transfer my collection of LPs (record albums) and
> audio cassette tapes onto optical media for archival.
>
> I have a high end CD player and a medium end LP player and wonder
> precisely how I can transfer these to DVD?
>
> I would like to maintain the highest possible fidelity so even dumping
> to .WAV or .FLAC is fine with me.

Make standard CDs instead of MP3. If you have lots of storage space,
you can archive the .iso files. When you run out of space, its a good
excuse to go buy an LTO [Honest honey, I need to transfer the music
off of the 99 cent cassette tapes onto $40 LTO cassette tapes, but
they'll hold 146 tapes-worth so its a bargain (100 GB per LTO / 700 MB
per audio cassette)]. For treasured LPs that haven't been re-issued on
CD it may be a serious idea.

>
> I have audio cables with gold plated connectors and my CD player is
> connected to a powered amplifier.
>

Well, you won't need the amplifier really but since its hooked up, treat
the computer like a second tape drive. However, for the best sound
quality, you want an external sound box not an internal card.

> Also I want to remove any cracks or pops from the LPs (especially)
> before archiving.

Look at the gramophile package.

> What settings should my amplifier have (or the sound card) when I do this?
>

Just hook the computer up as a tape deck. Line out on the sound card to
line in (a.k.a. 'play') on the amp. Line in on the sound card to line
out (a.k.a. 'record') on the amp. Use high quality shielded cable.
If you use a built-in sound card, you'll need the 1/8" plug to RCA plug
adapter. Keep all sound wires away from any computer wires and away
from power cables. Ensure that the sound system and the computer are
on compatible circuits to prevent a ground-loop.

> I have a relatively cheap sound card so what sound card would you
> recommend for this project (it must be Linux friendly)?
>

An external box. The only ones I've seen (never used) are Roland.

> I saw this USB device (apparently it uses a custom USB board to do the
> D/A conversion with claimed high fidelity) Xitel Import Deluxe device
> at Radio Shack:
> http://www.xitel.com/USA/prod_inportdl.htm
>
> But it only seems to save to MP3 and comes with MS Windows software only.
>
> If you can be as specific as possible that would really help
> (hardware, software, procedures, tips, etc.)


Just like any piece of equipment, especially sound equipment, you get
what you pay for. Radio Shack will have stuff that will work for the
bebop croud who can't tell the difference between MP3 on ear buds and a
real Hi-Fi LP (which is better than CD). Check out Roland. Find an
audiophile store near you and see what they suggest.

AFAIK, the external sound boxes have a card that goes in the computer
like a sound card and connect to an external box with a data cable. The
external box presents the RCA sockets for audio patch and has all the
D/A converters in so that its digital data that goes to the card in the
computer. It would have to work with linux. The best way to determine
this, if the manufacturer doesn't say it does, is to google the item
name and include the term 'linux' and see what comes up.

Enjoy and good luck.

Doug.


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Old 02-10-2008, 03:36 AM
"Telaman Consultancies"
 
Default Archiving audio (high fidelity)?

>
>
>
>---- Original Message ----
>From: dtutty@porchlight.ca
>To: debian-user@lists.debian.org
>Subject: Re: Archiving audio (high fidelity)?
>Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2008 19:59:48 -0500
>
>>On Sat, Feb 09, 2008 at 05:25:55PM -0500, Zach wrote:
>>> I would like to transfer my collection of LPs (record albums) and
>>> audio cassette tapes onto optical media for archival.
>>>
>>> I have a high end CD player and a medium end LP player and wonder
>>> precisely how I can transfer these to DVD?
>>>
>>> I would like to maintain the highest possible fidelity so even
>dumping
>>> to .WAV or .FLAC is fine with me.

Just so it's all together:

Flac for archiving, Ogg for streaming.
>>
>>Make standard CDs instead of MP3. If you have lots of storage
>space,
>>you can archive the .iso files. When you run out of space, its a
>good
>>excuse to go buy an LTO [Honest honey, I need to transfer the
>music
>>off of the 99 cent cassette tapes onto $40 LTO cassette tapes, but
>>they'll hold 146 tapes-worth so its a bargain (100 GB per LTO / 700
>MB
>>per audio cassette)]. For treasured LPs that haven't been re-issued
>on
>>CD it may be a serious idea.
>>
>>>
>>> I have audio cables with gold plated connectors and my CD player
>is
>>> connected to a powered amplifier.
>>>
>>
>>Well, you won't need the amplifier really but since its hooked up,
>treat
>>the computer like a second tape drive. However, for the best sound
>>quality, you want an external sound box not an internal card.

Iuse a creative sound blasterplatinum ex.
The generation after that is available now.
Works fine with alsa.
automatic detection through the alsaconf interface.
>>
>>> Also I want to remove any cracks or pops from the LPs (especially)
>>> before archiving.
>>
>>Look at the gramophile package.

gramofile.
>>
>>> What settings should my amplifier have (or the sound card) when I
>do this?
>>>
>>
>>Just hook the computer up as a tape deck. Line out on the sound
>card to
>>line in (a.k.a. 'play') on the amp. Line in on the sound card to
>line
>>out (a.k.a. 'record') on the amp. Use high quality shielded cable.
>>If you use a built-in sound card, you'll need the 1/8" plug to RCA
>plug
>>adapter. Keep all sound wires away from any computer wires and away
>>from power cables. Ensure that the sound system and the computer
>are
>>on compatible circuits to prevent a ground-loop.
>>
>>> I have a relatively cheap sound card so what sound card would you
>>> recommend for this project (it must be Linux friendly)?
>>>
>>
>>An external box. The only ones I've seen (never used) are Roland.
>>
>>> I saw this USB device (apparently it uses a custom USB board to do
>the
>>> D/A conversion with claimed high fidelity) Xitel Import Deluxe
>device
>>> at Radio Shack:
>>> http://www.xitel.com/USA/prod_inportdl.htm
>>>
>>> But it only seems to save to MP3 and comes with MS Windows
>software only.

Avoid all of this.

>>>
>>> If you can be as specific as possible that would really help
>>> (hardware, software, procedures, tips, etc.)
>>
>>
>>Just like any piece of equipment, especially sound equipment, you
>get
>>what you pay for. Radio Shack will have stuff that will work for
>the
>>bebop croud who can't tell the difference between MP3 on ear buds
>and a
>>real Hi-Fi LP (which is better than CD). Check out Roland. Find an
>>audiophile store near you and see what they suggest.
>>
>>AFAIK, the external sound boxes have a card that goes in the
>computer
>>like a sound card and connect to an external box with a data cable.
>The
>>external box presents the RCA sockets for audio patch and has all
>the
>>D/A converters in so that its digital data that goes to the card in
>the
>>computer. It would have to work with linux. The best way to
>determine
>>this, if the manufacturer doesn't say it does, is to google the item
>>name and include the term 'linux' and see what comes up.
>>
>>Enjoy and good luck.
>>
>>Doug.
Regards,

David Palmer.
 
Old 02-10-2008, 08:16 PM
"A. F. Cano"
 
Default Archiving audio (high fidelity)?

On Sat, Feb 09, 2008 at 05:25:55PM -0500, Zach wrote:
> I would like to transfer my collection of LPs (record albums) and
> audio cassette tapes onto optical media for archival.

The other poster already gave good advice on various issues.
I tried to do that some time ago. It is a lot of work. I was
using a pretty good Audigy sound card and my stereo is pretty
good (NAD), but I got a ground loop somewhere, even when I plugged
the computer in the same power strip as the stereo. Did a few
test recordings, couldn't get rid of the hum and gave up.

It would be easier to buy the CD equivalents, unless of course
they don't exist. That way, the recording studio would do all
the work that you'll end up doing. I found that to get an optimum
recording, I had to digitize each song multiple times to adjust
volume levels to get the max dynamic range without clipping.
And then there was the ground loop, so I gave up. Maybe I'll
try again some time.

Definitely, record at least in CD-quality.

A.


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Old 02-10-2008, 09:57 PM
"Russell L. Harris"
 
Default Archiving audio (high fidelity)?

* A. F. Cano <afc@shibaya.lonestar.org> [080210 16:21]:
> On Sat, Feb 09, 2008 at 05:25:55PM -0500, Zach wrote:
> > I would like to transfer my collection of LPs (record albums) and
> > audio cassette tapes onto optical media for archival.
>
> The other poster already gave good advice on various issues.
> I tried to do that some time ago. It is a lot of work.
> ...

The recent advent of low-cost ($200 to $1000) high-resolution (16-bit
and 24-bit) digital flash recorders with USB output suddenly has made
most direct-to-computer recording obsolete. All the pitfalls of
electrical noise, drivers, and interface software can be avoided.
Digitize and record to flash in one operation, then transfer to the
computer via USB with a simple drag-and-drop operation.

Even if you insist upon recording directly to a computer drive, the
use of an external interface (connected to the computer via USB or
Firewire) typically is a far superior approach to the use of a PCI
soundcard.

Check out the apparatus which is available from a dealer such as
www.bswusa.com.

RLH


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Old 02-11-2008, 05:14 PM
David Brodbeck
 
Default Archiving audio (high fidelity)?

On Feb 9, 2008, at 4:59 PM, Douglas A. Tutty wrote:

An external box. The only ones I've seen (never used) are Roland.


The Griffin iMic is popular with the Mac crowd and has a Linux driver.



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