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Old 03-03-2011, 04:42 PM
Jason Hsu
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall and servers, including SSH.

I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A. How do I use Computer B to clone Computer A? So far, I've only been able to clone Computer A by booting up a live CD on Computer A and running PartImage.

--
Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com>


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Old 03-03-2011, 05:05 PM
Camaleón
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 11:42:02 -0600, Jason Hsu wrote:

> Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall and servers,
> including SSH.
>
> I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A. How do I use
> Computer B to clone Computer A? So far, I've only been able to clone
> Computer A by booting up a live CD on Computer A and running PartImage.

I already replied to this:

http://lists.debian.org/debian-user/2011/02/msg02929.html

Did you by with rsync-ing it into another PC?

Greetings,

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Camaleón


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Old 03-03-2011, 05:30 PM
Klistvud
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

Dne, 03. 03. 2011 18:42:02 je Jason Hsu napisal(a):
Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall and servers,
including SSH.


I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A. How do I use
Computer B to clone Computer A? So far, I've only been able to clone
Computer A by booting up a live CD on Computer A and running
PartImage.




I assume that by "use Computer B" to clone Computer A you mean "how do
I clone A to B over the network". One solution would be piping dd
through ssh, as was explained somewhere on this very list several days
ago (apparently, dd can copy between hosts). A less "daring" approach
would be to simply use rsync. It is capable of resuming broken
downloads, and uses compression to save bandwidth. You should create
and mount the target partition on the remote server in advance. I've
cloned (actually, rsynced) data partitions with rsync and recently I've
successfully cloned my /home subtree over my LAN with


rsync -turboSzxpvg /home remoteserver:/destination_dir

Caveats: rsync has a very complex set of command line options. You
should study the man page in detail if you want things such as hard
links and ownership/permissions preserved. You may need to allow root
login in the remote ssh daemon, and then run rsync as root in order to
copy your / partition with the correct ownership/permissions. I'm not
sure how the "virtual" subtrees will behave though (/proc, /sys and the
like); and I don't know whether, for the / partition, it can be done
live. The other partitons should probably be OK.


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Cheerio,

Klistvud
http://bufferoverflow.tiddlyspot.com
Certifiable Loonix User #481801 Please reply to the list, not to
me.



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Old 03-04-2011, 08:18 AM
Yuriy Kuznetsov
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

Hi,

If you need to do it frequently I would recommend to look at clonezilla(http://clonezilla.org/). It's very easy to set up and can be used in different scenarios: one to one, one to many, only certain partitions on HDD, whole HDD, completely remote access(I was cloning different labs with different images remotely at the same time)...


It comes very handy for sys admin type of work.

Hope it helps.

Kind regards,
Yuriy.

On Thu, Mar 3, 2011 at 6:30 PM, Klistvud <quotations@aliceadsl.fr> wrote:

Dne, 03. 03. 2011 18:42:02 je Jason Hsu napisal(a):


Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall and servers, including SSH.



I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A. *How do I use Computer B to clone Computer A? *So far, I've only been able to clone Computer A by booting up a live CD on Computer A and running PartImage.






I assume that by "use Computer B" to clone Computer A you mean "how do I clone A to B over the network". One solution would be piping dd through ssh, as was explained somewhere on this very list several days ago (apparently, dd can copy between hosts). A less "daring" approach would be to simply use rsync. It is capable of resuming broken downloads, and uses compression to save bandwidth. You should create and mount the target partition on the remote server in advance. I've cloned (actually, rsynced) data partitions with rsync and recently I've successfully cloned my /home subtree over my LAN with




rsync -turboSzxpvg /home remoteserver:/destination_dir



Caveats: rsync has a very complex set of command line options. You should study the man page in detail if you want things such as hard links and ownership/permissions preserved. You may need to allow root login in the remote ssh daemon, and then run rsync as root in order to copy your / partition with the correct ownership/permissions. I'm not sure how the "virtual" subtrees will behave though (/proc, /sys and the like); and I don't know whether, for the / partition, it can be done live. The other partitons should probably be OK.




--

Cheerio,



Klistvud * * * * * * * * * * * * * * http://bufferoverflow.tiddlyspot.com

Certifiable Loonix User #481801 * * *Please reply to the list, not to me.





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Old 03-04-2011, 11:07 AM
Klaus Wolf
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

Hi,

if the clone really is a clone its the easy way to
copy the harddisk with gparted.
o.K. - so it is my way.

So long and a nice day

klaus

Am Freitag, den 04.03.2011, 09:18 +0000 schrieb Yuriy Kuznetsov:
> Hi,
>
> If you need to do it frequently I would recommend to look at
> clonezilla(http://clonezilla.org/). It's very easy to set up and can
> be used in different scenarios: one to one, one to many, only certain
> partitions on HDD, whole HDD, completely remote access(I was cloning
> different labs with different images remotely at the same time)...
>
> It comes very handy for sys admin type of work.
>
> Hope it helps.
>
> Kind regards,
> Yuriy.
>
> On Thu, Mar 3, 2011 at 6:30 PM, Klistvud <quotations@aliceadsl.fr>
> wrote:
> Dne, 03. 03. 2011 18:42:02 je Jason Hsu napisal(a):
>
> Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall
> and servers, including SSH.
>
> I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A.
> How do I use Computer B to clone Computer A? So far,
> I've only been able to clone Computer A by booting up
> a live CD on Computer A and running PartImage.
>
>
>
> I assume that by "use Computer B" to clone Computer A you mean
> "how do I clone A to B over the network". One solution would
> be piping dd through ssh, as was explained somewhere on this
> very list several days ago (apparently, dd can copy between
> hosts). A less "daring" approach would be to simply use rsync.
> It is capable of resuming broken downloads, and uses
> compression to save bandwidth. You should create and mount the
> target partition on the remote server in advance. I've cloned
> (actually, rsynced) data partitions with rsync and recently
> I've successfully cloned my /home subtree over my LAN with
>
> rsync -turboSzxpvg /home remoteserver:/destination_dir
>
> Caveats: rsync has a very complex set of command line options.
> You should study the man page in detail if you want things
> such as hard links and ownership/permissions preserved. You
> may need to allow root login in the remote ssh daemon, and
> then run rsync as root in order to copy your / partition with
> the correct ownership/permissions. I'm not sure how the
> "virtual" subtrees will behave though (/proc, /sys and the
> like); and I don't know whether, for the / partition, it can
> be done live. The other partitons should probably be OK.
>
> --
> Cheerio,
>
> Klistvud
> http://bufferoverflow.tiddlyspot.com
> Certifiable Loonix User #481801 Please reply to the list,
> not to me.
>
>
> --
> To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to
> debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.orgwith a subject of
> "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
> Archive: http://lists.debian.org/1299177051.22428.1@compax
>
>



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Old 03-04-2011, 03:14 PM
Hal Vaughan
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

On Mar 3, 2011, at 12:42 PM, Jason Hsu wrote:

> Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall and servers, including SSH.
>
> I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A. How do I use Computer B to clone Computer A? So far, I've only been able to clone Computer A by booting up a live CD on Computer A and running PartImage.

I'm not clear if you want to clone A to B, or if you're planning on using A as an image for later installs. In other words, by cloning A, it could be your intent to take the cloned image and install it in other computers along the way. By "use Computer B to clone Computer A," it sounds to me like you want to create a cloned image of Computer A that can be stored on Computer B. That's what leads me to wonder if the intent is to create an image of A, and it would seem a most likely use of that image would be to use to create new systems easily and quickly.

If that is your purpose, I just went through that in creating an image for embedded systems (specifically a Soekris Net5501).

There's one issue nobody's mentioned here: now Debian (and a lot of distros) keeps track of drives and partitions with UUIDs since people are using portable RAM drives now. This effects GRUB2 and /etc/fstab. So if you clone A to an image or to B, be sure to be aware of the issues with UUIDs. This can also create a problem with MAC addresses, too.

When using a cloned image moved from one set of hardware to another, I had to update /boot/grub/grub.cfg for the first boot, but also edit /etc/default/grub and make sure, after that first boot, that I ran update-grub and regenerated /boot/grub/grub.cfg (it's also possible to stick the UUID in /boot/grub/grub.cfg if you have a cloned image where you can edit the files).

The other problem that is easy to run into if you are, by chance, cloning the image to a computer without a keyboard or monitor, is that unless it has an assigned IP address, you won't know where it is on the LAN. I solved this by writing a simple two-part program that makes it easy to find the new computers that use the cloned image I'm using.

I have an image I generated for use on the embedded system I mentioned and it has a Perl script that makes the needed modifications to get the image working on other hardware. It also had the Perl scripts I used to make that system easily locatable on an LAN at http://halblog.com/SqueezeOnSoekris.html. The Perl script that handles updating the image is pretty easy and if you look through it, you'll see all the changes it makes to the cloned image to make it easy to install on a new system without duplicating things like the host name.

While this covers more than what you asked, I hope it helps since these are issues that you'll run into these days when you run a cloned system on hardware other than that which the source of the clone runs on.




Hal

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Old 03-04-2011, 05:56 PM
Joseph Brenner
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

I think people are assuming identical hardware, and if that's not the
case, you need to be careful about just doing an "rsync" between the
boxes. Even getting a list of debs from one machine and trying to
bulk install them on the other can bet tricky... as I remember it
there are some packages that are specific for 64bit architectures, and
some for 32.


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Old 03-04-2011, 11:32 PM
Scott Ferguson
 
Default How do I clone Computer A from Computer B?

On 05/03/11 10:38, Hal Vaughan wrote:
>
> On Mar 4, 2011, at 6:09 PM, Scott Ferguson wrote:
>
>> On 05/03/11 03:14, Hal Vaughan wrote:
>>>
>>> On Mar 3, 2011, at 12:42 PM, Jason Hsu wrote:
>>>
>>>> Computer A is running minimal Debian with a firewall and servers, including SSH.
>>>>
>>>> I can use Computer B to ssh my way into Computer A. How do I use Computer B to clone Computer A? So far, I've only been able to clone Computer A by booting up a live CD on Computer A and running PartImage.
>>>
>>> I'm not clear if you want to clone A to B, or if you're planning on using A as an image for later installs. In other words, by cloning A, it could be your intent to take the cloned image and install it in other computers along the way. By "use Computer B to clone Computer A," it sounds to me like you want to create a cloned image of Computer A that can be stored on Computer B. That's what leads me to wonder if the intent is to create an image of A, and it would seem a most likely use of that image would be to use to create new systems easily and quickly.
>>>
>>> If that is your purpose, I just went through that in creating an image for embedded systems (specifically a Soekris Net5501).
>>>
>>> There's one issue nobody's mentioned here: now Debian (and a lot of distros) keeps track of drives and partitions with UUIDs since people are using portable RAM drives now. This effects GRUB2 and /etc/fstab. So if you clone A to an image or to B, be sure to be aware of the issues with UUIDs. This can also create a problem with MAC addresses, too.
>>>
>>> When using a cloned image moved from one set of hardware to another, I had to update /boot/grub/grub.cfg for the first boot, but also edit /etc/default/grub and make sure, after that first boot, that I ran update-grub and regenerated /boot/grub/grub.cfg (it's also possible to stick the UUID in /boot/grub/grub.cfg if you have a cloned image where you can edit the files).
>>>
>>> The other problem that is easy to run into if you are, by chance, cloning the image to a computer without a keyboard or monitor, is that unless it has an assigned IP address, you won't know where it is on the LAN. I solved this by writing a simple two-part program that makes it easy to find the new computers that use the cloned image I'm using.
>>>
>>> I have an image I generated for use on the embedded system I mentioned and it has a Perl script that makes the needed modifications to get the image working on other hardware. It also had the Perl scripts I used to make that system easily locatable on an LAN at http://halblog.com/SqueezeOnSoekris.html. The Perl script that handles updating the image is pretty easy and if you look through it, you'll see all the changes it makes to the cloned image to make it easy to install on a new system without duplicating things like the host name.
>>>
>>> While this covers more than what you asked, I hope it helps since these are issues that you'll run into these days when you run a cloned system on hardware other than that which the source of the clone runs on.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Hal
>>>
>>
>>
>> ?? I think you've missposted that ;-p
>>
>> Does the poster even have identical hardware on A and B?
>>
>> Good luck with that one.
>
> Do you have NOTHING to do other than to respond to my post to D-U with any critical comment you can think of?
>
> Actually, he emailed me off-list and was very appreciative of my response and said that it's pretty much on target for what he's looking at doing.

? See the comment. Take a breath.

>
> So, see, sometimes looking at the bigger issue and offering thoughts and suggestions that aren't a direct answer are exactly what helps the poster.
>
>
>
> Hal

Misspost means - *you posted to me*, *not* the list, which you obviously
intended to do.

sigh

Cheers


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