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Old 02-28-2011, 06:47 PM
Jason Hsu
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise desktop? My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.

What features/characteristics are needed for an enterprise desktop computer that aren't needed for a home desktop computer?

Are there companies or organizations that use Linux Mint? Linux Mint is the distro I recommend to Windows users. Linux Mint has a Windows-like feel, and I find it more user-friendly than Ubuntu. Since Mint is based on Ubuntu, most of the help out there for Ubuntu also applies for Mint.

For those of you who have helped a company or organization migrate from Windows to Linux or from one Linux distro to another, what is your preference?

--
Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com>


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Old 02-28-2011, 06:56 PM
Chris Brennan
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 2:47 PM, Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com> wrote:


Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise desktop? *My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.



http://distrowatch.com/*is probably what you want.--


Did you know...
If you play a Windows 2000 CD backwards, you hear satanic messages,
but what's worse is when you play it forward....
...it installs Windows 2000
-- Alfred Perlstein on chat at freebsd.org





*
 
Old 02-28-2011, 07:09 PM
Slicky Johnson
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Mon, 28 Feb 2011 14:56:07 -0500
Chris Brennan <xaero@xaerolimit.net> wrote:

> On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 2:47 PM, Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the
> > enterprise desktop? My guess is that the most popular enterprise
> > desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.
> >
>
> http://distrowatch.com/ is probably what you want.
>

Well I think their stats are not the greatest. I'm sure most people
know that every 15 year old kid has downloaded Ubuntu no less than
about a thousand times. Same kid has no idea about the rolling upgrade
process and wait's so patiently until the official release party has
said, yes it's done.. All the while LOUDLY proclaiming that it can't be
found by pointing a source list at the newest and lamest project. Even
more the reason they are all surprised how developers actually have
access to 11.04 or whatever and they wait for /. to announce where to
'find' a beta build or whatever..

distrowatch is like counting the miles of a car tire stuck in snow.


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Old 02-28-2011, 07:34 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 21:47, Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com> wrote:
> Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise desktop? *My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.
>
> What features/characteristics are needed for an enterprise desktop computer that aren't needed for a home desktop computer?
>
> Are there companies or organizations that use Linux Mint? *Linux Mint is the distro I recommend to Windows users. *Linux Mint has a Windows-like feel, and I find it more user-friendly than Ubuntu. *Since Mint is based on Ubuntu, most of the help out there for Ubuntu also applies for Mint.
>
> For those of you who have helped a company or organization migrate from Windows to Linux or from one Linux distro to another, what is your preference?
>

This is easy: RHEL or it's twin CentOS. It is widely deployed on
servers, probably on par with or more than Debian in my anecdotal
dealings. It is also often found as a enterprise desktop OS, the only
one that really competes with Suse. Other than RHEL/CentOS and Suse,
you won't find anything on an enterprise desktop. I'm donning the
fireproof undies now... Gentlemen: flame me with your Debian
enterprise desktop experience please!


--
Dotan Cohen

http://gibberish.co.il
http://what-is-what.com


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Old 02-28-2011, 07:42 PM
"John A. Sullivan III"
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Mon, 2011-02-28 at 22:34 +0200, Dotan Cohen wrote:
> On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 21:47, Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com> wrote:
> > Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise desktop? My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.
> >
> > What features/characteristics are needed for an enterprise desktop computer that aren't needed for a home desktop computer?
> >
> > Are there companies or organizations that use Linux Mint? Linux Mint is the distro I recommend to Windows users. Linux Mint has a Windows-like feel, and I find it more user-friendly than Ubuntu. Since Mint is based on Ubuntu, most of the help out there for Ubuntu also applies for Mint.
> >
> > For those of you who have helped a company or organization migrate from Windows to Linux or from one Linux distro to another, what is your preference?
> >
>
> This is easy: RHEL or it's twin CentOS. It is widely deployed on
> servers, probably on par with or more than Debian in my anecdotal
> dealings. It is also often found as a enterprise desktop OS, the only
> one that really competes with Suse. Other than RHEL/CentOS and Suse,
> you won't find anything on an enterprise desktop. I'm donning the
> fireproof undies now... Gentlemen: flame me with your Debian
> enterprise desktop experience please!
<snip>
I've been following this with interest as we are about to deploy what we
hope will be very many enterprise desktops. We had originally planned
on Ubuntu until we realized their understanding of long term support was
very different from our understanding.

We are very big RedHat fans as they really seem to walk the walk when it
comes to open source and so considered both CentOS/RHEL and Fedora. The
intentionally short support cycles for Fedora were the showstopper there
while CentOS/RHEL tend to lag too far behind for a desktop as opposed to
a server distribution.

That is ultimately what led us to Debian. It has been our first major
experience with Debian and we have been quite pleased with it as the
best balance for a desktop OS thus far when we combine stable,
backports, and occasional bits from testing with a well designed
preferences file. Very, very interested in other thoughts - John


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Old 02-28-2011, 07:48 PM
"Boyd Stephen Smith Jr."
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Monday 28 February 2011 13:47:23 Jason Hsu wrote:
> For those of you who have helped a company or organization migrate from
> Windows to Linux or from one Linux distro to another, what is your
> preference?

The only time I've been involved in such a project it was from a hetrogenous
AIX/HP-UX/NCR(legacy) environment to a hetrogenous AIX/HP-UX/NCR(legacy)/SLES
environment.

I would have recommended Debian instead, but I wasn't consulted. SLES allows
them to mostly operate in the same manner, as they were previously, though. A
shift to Debian would have required them to take a more active role in OS
issue diagnosis and remediation, but they have sufficient technical staff to
do so.
--
Boyd Stephen Smith Jr. ,= ,-_-. =.
bss@iguanasuicide.net ((_/)o o(\_))
ICQ: 514984 YM/AIM: DaTwinkDaddy `-'(. .)`-'
http://iguanasuicide.net/ \_/
 
Old 02-28-2011, 07:48 PM
Thierry Chatelet
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Monday 28 February 2011 20:47:23 Jason Hsu wrote:
> Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise
> desktop? My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are
> Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.

Maybe one of us should go and replace you whenyou go for your consulting job?
Thierry


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Old 02-28-2011, 08:07 PM
Miles Fidelman
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

Dotan Cohen wrote:

On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 21:47, Jason Hsu<jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com> wrote:


Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise desktop? My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.


This is easy: RHEL or it's twin CentOS. It is widely deployed on
servers, probably on par with or more than Debian in my anecdotal
dealings. It is also often found as a enterprise desktop OS, the only
one that really competes with Suse. Other than RHEL/CentOS and Suse,
you won't find anything on an enterprise desktop. I'm donning the
fireproof undies now... Gentlemen: flame me with your Debian
enterprise desktop experience please!

And, if you include US Government (particularly DoD), RedHat is probably
the primary form of Linux that you'll find. They've pretty much
established themselves in the procurement channels.


Miles Fidelman


--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
In<fnord> practice, there is. .... Yogi Berra



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Old 02-28-2011, 08:20 PM
"Boyd Stephen Smith Jr."
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Monday 28 February 2011 14:42:41 John A. Sullivan III wrote:
> That is ultimately what led us to Debian. It has been our first major
> experience with Debian and we have been quite pleased with it as the
> best balance for a desktop OS thus far when we combine stable,
> backports, and occasional bits from testing with a well designed
> preferences file. Very, very interested in other thoughts - John

I run multiple Debian systems that have stable/testing/unstable/experimental
and all the add-ons volatile/backports/security/updates/proposed updates. I
use a preference file that keeps me with stable+security+volatile/updates
mostly and for the times when I want something out of one of the other
repositories tracks upgrades so that I get security updates in a timely
manner.

I use unattanded-upgrades with a lightly massaged configuration, one custom
one-line cronjob, logcheck plus a tiny bit of custom logcheck rules, and a
good tripwire policy to keep them up-to-date and provide baseline reporting.
It would take some effort, but not much, to extend this to 100 systems. At
that point, a new stable release would take a lot of effort to manage.

Throw in nagios and a bunch of custom rules, determine a process for managing
the stable upgrade including more automation, tie all of that into a ticketing
system that includes a mass of scripts to pre-analyze the reports and will
reduce communication overhead (since you'll need more that 3 administrators at
that point) and you can probably scale to 1000, maybe more depending on how
similar the systems are. Administrators will be remote for virtually all of
these systems, have a plan for accessing each system when it's primary network
connectivity is down and going no-site if absolutely necessary.

Beyond that point, the number of administrators gets too large, and you'll
certainly start running to to too many slightly different configurations /
configuration sets. Specialization and division of responsibility are key
here, and SELinux or AppArmor should be added to the environment to enforce
divisions of responsibility so no one team is stepping on another. Debian
security is good, but your organization likely has quite a large vulnerability
cross section; your own security team should be doing active penetration
testing on your own systems, monitoring disclosures, and helping the Debian
security team, particularly testing fixes to see if they introduce regressions
and testing exploits to see if they affect (your) Debian systems.

At all stages, particularly when using Debian, your administration staff needs
to be encouraged to interact with the community around issues they encounter
and to contribute as much as possible so that your system diverge as little as
possible from the well-tested releases. Even if your business is software, it
is unlikely to be providing a UNIX-like OS; whatever "IP" is produced by your
administration stuff is not a competitive advantage in your market, so it is
better to share and integrate it than it is to maintain it on your own. Many
FLOSS projects are slightly averse to breaking someone's working setup if they
know it exists and contributors will often provide backwards compatibility
and/or detailed migration instructions if they know there's a need for it.
--
Boyd Stephen Smith Jr. ,= ,-_-. =.
bss@iguanasuicide.net ((_/)o o(\_))
ICQ: 514984 YM/AIM: DaTwinkDaddy `-'(. .)`-'
http://iguanasuicide.net/ \_/
 
Old 02-28-2011, 08:27 PM
shawn wilson
 
Default Best and most popular distros for the enterprise desktop

On Feb 28, 2011 3:35 PM, "Dotan Cohen" <dotancohen@gmail.com> wrote:

>

> On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 21:47, Jason Hsu <jhsu802701@jasonhsu.com> wrote:

> > Are there any rankings of the most popular Linux distros for the enterprise desktop? *My guess is that the most popular enterprise desktop distros are Ubuntu, RedHat, and SUSE.

> >

> > What features/characteristics are needed for an enterprise desktop computer that aren't needed for a home desktop computer?

> >

> > Are there companies or organizations that use Linux Mint? *Linux Mint is the distro I recommend to Windows users. *Linux Mint has a Windows-like feel, and I find it more user-friendly than Ubuntu. *Since Mint is based on Ubuntu, most of the help out there for Ubuntu also applies for Mint.


> >

> > For those of you who have helped a company or organization migrate from Windows to Linux or from one Linux distro to another, what is your preference?

> >

>

> This is easy: RHEL or it's twin CentOS. It is widely deployed on

> servers, probably on par with or more than Debian in my anecdotal

> dealings. It is also often found as a enterprise desktop OS, the only

> one that really competes with Suse. Other than RHEL/CentOS and Suse,

> you won't find anything on an enterprise desktop. I'm donning the

> fireproof undies now... Gentlemen: flame me with your Debian

> enterprise desktop experience please!

>

I can say that unless I *know* that I will be available to support the system for the full life span of the current hardware (I generally estimate at 4yr from new to trash) I recommend centos. The thing with cent is that redhat will immediately support it as long as the version isn't eol as soon as you buy maintenance for it.



While ubuntu, Oracle, IBM, Novell and others might have *nix support, it is either pricey, shitty, or untested by me. Besides redhat has an office in Va, a mile from me if I ever have serious issues. I seriously doubt they take walk ins, all the same - I know where they live.



So, even though I think I smell dog shit on the bottom of my shoes every time I type rpm or yum, I will still recommend them for corporate use just because I know support will be there if I'm not.


Ps - as much as I dislike redhat, sles takes the cake for the worst corporate *nix imo.
 

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