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Old 12-16-2010, 10:06 AM
Juan Ignacio Gaudio
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Hello,
I broke my X (again) trying to install a graphics device driver on my Vostro 1000, so now I don't have video and the keyboard does not respond.
I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the previous xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do that before X crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a way of changing the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X startup during Linux boot process (some key combination or anything).

I'm running Debian Lenny.
Thanks!
 
Old 12-16-2010, 10:15 AM
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

You can instruct the OS to boot into a diffrent run level by editing the kernel line before you boot it in grub. It will affect only that boot.

I don't have the comand syntex infront of me, but a google for it should produce the info.

From: Juan Ignacio Gaudio <jgaudio@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2010 12:06:31 +0100To: <debian-user@lists.debian.org>Subject: Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process
Hello,
I broke my X (again) trying to install a graphics device driver on my Vostro 1000, so now I don't have video and the keyboard does not respond.
I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the previous xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do that before X crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a way of changing the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X startup during Linux boot process (some key combination or anything).

I'm running Debian Lenny.
Thanks!
 
Old 12-16-2010, 10:21 AM
Juan Ignacio Gaudio
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Hello,
I searched it and turned up to be pretty simple.
It's just needed to append the runlevel number to the kernel line, something like this example:

kernel*/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.30*root=/dev/sda2*ro*3

Thanks,Juan

2010/12/16 <teddieeb@tmo.blackberry.net>



You can instruct the OS to boot into a diffrent run level by editing the kernel line before you boot it in grub. It will affect only that boot.

I don't have the comand syntex infront of me, but a google for it should produce the info.


From: Juan Ignacio Gaudio <jgaudio@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2010 12:06:31 +0100To: <debian-user@lists.debian.org>Subject: Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Hello,
I broke my X (again) trying to install a graphics device driver on my Vostro 1000, so now I don't have video and the keyboard does not respond.

I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the previous xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do that before X crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a way of changing the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X startup during Linux boot process (some key combination or anything).


I'm running Debian Lenny.
Thanks!
 
Old 12-16-2010, 05:31 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Juan Ignacio Gaudio wrote:
> > I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the previous
> > xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do that before X
> > crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a way of changing
> > the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X startup during Linux boot
> > process (some key combination or anything).
>
> I searched it and turned up to be pretty simple.
>
> It's just needed to append the runlevel number to the kernel line, something
> like this example:
>
> kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.30 root=/dev/sda2 ro 3

Note that the above isn't going to boot without X on a default Debian
Lenny system unless you have changed it. By default on Debian all
runlevels are configured the same. There isn't anything magical about
runlevel 2 or 3 or 4 or 5. By default they are all the same.

You can as a local admin configure them to be different but unless you
have done so then booting runlevel 3 won't be any different than
booting the default runlevel 2. X will start the same.

The traditional solution would be to boot single user mode with S or
'single' and make corrections from there. Alternatively you can
disable gdm/kdm/xdm temporarily and then reboot to the full system
which will then be a text console.

Bob
 
Old 12-17-2010, 09:05 AM
Camaleón
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 12:06:31 +0100, Juan Ignacio Gaudio wrote:

> I broke my X (again) trying to install a graphics device driver on my
> Vostro 1000, so now I don't have video and the keyboard does not
> respond.
>
> I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the
> previous xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do
> that before X crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a
> way of changing the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X
> startup during Linux boot process (some key combination or anything).
>
> I'm running Debian Lenny.

In addition to all the good advice you got, remember that you could also
login into the machine via SSH (should you have it enabled) and make the
changes from there. X is crashing, not the whole system ;-)

Greetings,

--
Camaleón


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Old 12-17-2010, 10:48 AM
Juan Ignacio Gaudio
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Hello,
As Bob suggested, I was able to boot in single user mode and restore X config file from there.
Thanks for your help!
Juan.


2010/12/17 Camaleón <noelamac@gmail.com>

On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 12:06:31 +0100, Juan Ignacio Gaudio wrote:



> I broke my X (again) trying to install a graphics device driver on my

> Vostro 1000, so now I don't have video and the keyboard does not

> respond.

>

> I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the

> previous xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do

> that before X crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a

> way of changing the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X

> startup during Linux boot process (some key combination or anything).

>

> I'm running Debian Lenny.



In addition to all the good advice you got, remember that you could also

login into the machine via SSH (should you have it enabled) and make the

changes from there. X is crashing, not the whole system ;-)



Greetings,



--

Camaleón





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Old 12-19-2010, 02:53 PM
Lisi
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

On Thursday 16 December 2010 18:31:46 Bob Proulx wrote:
> Juan Ignacio Gaudio wrote:
> > > I just need to be able to change to a console tty and restore the
> > > previous xorg.conf. But as X starts automatically I can't manage to do
> > > that before X crashes and I lose the keyboard again... do you know of a
> > > way of changing the runlevel to just console (no X) or aborting X
> > > startup during Linux boot process (some key combination or anything).
> >
> > I searched it and turned up to be pretty simple.
> >
> > It's just needed to append the runlevel number to the kernel line,
> > something like this example:
> >
> > kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.30 root=/dev/sda2 ro 3
>
> Note that the above isn't going to boot without X on a default Debian
> Lenny system unless you have changed it. By default on Debian all
> runlevels are configured the same. There isn't anything magical about
> runlevel 2 or 3 or 4 or 5. By default they are all the same.
>
> You can as a local admin configure them to be different but unless you
> have done so then booting runlevel 3 won't be any different than
> booting the default runlevel 2. X will start the same.
>
> The traditional solution would be to boot single user mode with S or
> 'single' and make corrections from there. Alternatively you can
> disable gdm/kdm/xdm temporarily and then reboot to the full system
> which will then be a text console.

Once we are thinking in terms of run-level by number, why not just use "1"
(without the quotation marks!) which on a Debian system is the CLI? Or, of
course, choose single user in GRUB.

Lisi


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Old 12-19-2010, 05:46 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Lisi wrote:
> Bob Proulx wrote:
> > The traditional solution would be to boot single user mode with S or
> > 'single' and make corrections from there. Alternatively you can
> > disable gdm/kdm/xdm temporarily and then reboot to the full system
> > which will then be a text console.
>
> Once we are thinking in terms of run-level by number, why not just use "1"
> (without the quotation marks!) which on a Debian system is the CLI? Or, of
> course, choose single user in GRUB.

Runlevel 1 is almost universially used to implement single user mode.
When you ask why not use 1 instead of "single" the answer is that
there isn't any reason. I just think it more clear to ask for single
user mode directly and not jump to the runlevel that you know
implements it. But you can if you know that information. No reason
not to.

To see Debian's documentation on runlevels look here:

/usr/share/doc/sysv-rc/README.runlevels.gz

To look to see how different systems have implemented runlevels see
this Wikipedia page. I think it does a good job of capturing the
differences. I consider this information must know info for talking
about runlevels. Make sure you look at the Unix System V table
because that is the grandfather of all of the present systems.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runlevel

Bob

P.S.
The confusion that results from people looking today (as opposed to
twenty years ago) at runlevels is one of the reasons people want to
move to the new parallel boot process. Every system has implemented
these numbers slightly differently. There isn't consistency across
vendors. And I wouldn't want there to be! Because Debian has the
better system in this case and I wouldn't want it to be forced to
change to something worse such as one of the other vendor's offerings.
Which is what would happen if it were standardized. The new parallel
boot process sidesteps the issue entirely by moving to something
completely different.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 06:02 PM
Lisi
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

On Sunday 19 December 2010 18:46:18 Bob Proulx wrote:
> Runlevel 1 is almost universially used to implement single user mode.
> When you ask why not use 1 instead of "single" the answer is that
> there isn't any reason. *I just think it more clear to ask for single
> user mode directly and not jump to the runlevel that you know
> implements it. *But you can if you know that information. *No reason
> not to.

If I want to boot into single user from a cold start, I do it via GRUB. But
if I am in a GUI and I want to actually change (rather than just bring up a
tty) I use "init 1". I don't think that "init s" would work - but you are
probably about to tell me that it would. ;-)

Lisi


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Old 12-19-2010, 06:09 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default Spontaneously aborting X startup during Linux boot process

Lisi wrote:
> If I want to boot into single user from a cold start, I do it via GRUB. But
> if I am in a GUI and I want to actually change (rather than just bring up a
> tty) I use "init 1". I don't think that "init s" would work - but you are
> probably about to tell me that it would. ;-)

Yes. I am going to say, "It should work." :-)

Personally I wouldn't move from multiuser to single user directly. I
would always reboot first and then boot into single user mode. Then
when leaving single user mode reboot into multiple user mode. That
way is very well tested. Doing other things /should/ work but I
wouldn't be surprised to find interesting corner cases. It is
definitely the road less well traveled.

Bob
 

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