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Old 02-02-2008, 09:53 AM
Jan Willem Stumpel
 
Default fsck.ext3

After converting my file system to ext3, I thought there would be
no more lengthy fsck's every 20 or so boot-ups. But they still
happen.

Some Googling revealed different opinions; some people say "ext3
does not need periodic fsck's", others say "even with ext3, it is
best to fsck every N boots, because PC hardware is cr*p". And
there are also several different methods (apparently) for
disabling periodic fsck's.

Is there a "standard Debian doctrine" or "standard Debian
practice" for this?

Regards, Jan


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Old 02-02-2008, 10:28 AM
Brad Rogers
 
Default fsck.ext3

On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 11:53:46 +0100
Jan Willem Stumpel <jstumpel@planet.nl> wrote:

Hello Jan,

> After converting my file system to ext3, I thought there would be
> no more lengthy fsck's every 20 or so boot-ups. But they still
> happen.

Even with ext3, I get checks between 30 and 35 boots per partition. It
can, under certain circumstances, mean an fsck run on four consecutive
boots. Having said that, it's really only noticeable on the /home
partition, as that is far and away the largest, at 120GB.

--
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/ ) "The blindingly obvious is
/ _)rad never immediately apparent"

Where will you be when the bodies burn?
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Old 02-02-2008, 10:51 AM
Sven Joachim
 
Default fsck.ext3

On 2008-02-02 11:53 +0100, Jan Willem Stumpel wrote:

> After converting my file system to ext3, I thought there would be
> no more lengthy fsck's every 20 or so boot-ups. But they still
> happen.

You can increase the number of mounts between checks with "tune2fs -c",
see tune2fs(8).

> Some Googling revealed different opinions; some people say "ext3
> does not need periodic fsck's", others say "even with ext3, it is
> best to fsck every N boots, because PC hardware is cr*p". And
> there are also several different methods (apparently) for
> disabling periodic fsck's.

The tune2fs manpage recommends to check filesystems at least
ocasionally, so you should not use _both_ "tune2fs -c 0" and
"tune2fs -i 0".

> Is there a "standard Debian doctrine" or "standard Debian
> practice" for this?

None that I know of.

Sven


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Old 02-02-2008, 01:09 PM
Ron Johnson
 
Default fsck.ext3

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Hash: SHA1

On 02/02/08 04:53, Jan Willem Stumpel wrote:
> After converting my file system to ext3, I thought there would be
> no more lengthy fsck's every 20 or so boot-ups. But they still
> happen.

Correct. That's the primary ext4 design goal.

The benefit of ext3 is that it doesn't need an fsck after *every*
improper shutdown.

> Some Googling revealed different opinions; some people say "ext3
> does not need periodic fsck's", others say "even with ext3, it is
> best to fsck every N boots, because PC hardware is cr*p". And
> there are also several different methods (apparently) for
> disabling periodic fsck's.
>
> Is there a "standard Debian doctrine" or "standard Debian
> practice" for this?

The 20-or-so is different per partition, so that they won't all fsck
at the same time.

However, because a stable Linux system shouldn't reboot very often,
just relying on a boot counter might mean that it would be years
between fsck. So, the system also forces an fsck every N days
(where N is slightly different per partition). Thus, if you only
reboot yearly, they'll all fsck.

- --
Ron Johnson, Jr.
Jefferson LA USA

PETA - People Eating Tasty Animals
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Old 02-02-2008, 02:16 PM
Sam Leon
 
Default fsck.ext3

Jan Willem Stumpel wrote:

After converting my file system to ext3, I thought there would be
no more lengthy fsck's every 20 or so boot-ups. But they still
happen.

Some Googling revealed different opinions; some people say "ext3
does not need periodic fsck's", others say "even with ext3, it is
best to fsck every N boots, because PC hardware is cr*p". And
there are also several different methods (apparently) for
disabling periodic fsck's.

Is there a "standard Debian doctrine" or "standard Debian
practice" for this?

Regards, Jan





I set mine for 60 days or 100 mounts.


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Old 02-02-2008, 06:01 PM
"Manon Metten"
 
Default fsck.ext3

Hi,

On 2/2/08, Sam Leon <sam@datanet.ath.cx> wrote:


I set mine for 60 days or 100 mounts.


Before I change something, I would like to know the current
setings. How do I find those?

Greetings, Manon.
 
Old 02-02-2008, 10:12 PM
"Paul Johnson"
 
Default fsck.ext3

On Feb 2, 2008 2:53 AM, Jan Willem Stumpel <jstumpel@planet.nl> wrote:
> After converting my file system to ext3, I thought there would be
> no more lengthy fsck's every 20 or so boot-ups. But they still
> happen.
>
> Some Googling revealed different opinions; some people say "ext3
> does not need periodic fsck's", others say "even with ext3, it is
> best to fsck every N boots, because PC hardware is cr*p". And
> there are also several different methods (apparently) for
> disabling periodic fsck's.
>
> Is there a "standard Debian doctrine" or "standard Debian
> practice" for this?

I usually use tune2fs to change checks to every 30 days or 30 boots,
mostly because I don't boot that often; I either leave machines on
(thus not unmounting filesystems) or use hibernate.

--
Paul Johnson
baloo@ursine.ca


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Old 02-02-2008, 10:15 PM
"Paul Johnson"
 
Default fsck.ext3

On Feb 2, 2008 11:01 AM, Manon Metten <manon.metten@gmail.com> wrote:
> Before I change something, I would like to know the current
> setings. How do I find those?

I believe the manual page for tune2fs would be able to tell you how to
display the current filesystem options.

--
Paul Johnson
baloo@ursine.ca


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Old 02-07-2008, 10:25 PM
Michelle Konzack
 
Default fsck.ext3

Am 2008-02-02 15:15:36, schrieb Paul Johnson:
> On Feb 2, 2008 11:01 AM, Manon Metten <manon.metten@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Before I change something, I would like to know the current
> > setings. How do I find those?
>
> I believe the manual page for tune2fs would be able to tell you how to
> display the current filesystem options.

dumpe2fs -h /dev/hdaX

and then look for:

Mount count:
Maximum mount count:

Thanks, Greetings and nice Day
Michelle Konzack
Systemadministrator
Tamay Dogan Network
Debian GNU/Linux Consultant


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