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Old 11-05-2010, 08:29 PM
pch0317
 
Default New DNS serwer - hardware

Hi

I must buy new DNS servers (hardware) to our company.
Now DNS (bind on debian) works on PC machine (3 identical NS servers).

How to check number of DNS request to current DNS machines (how to check
current DNS load).
How to match new server components like processor, memory and other to
this load.
Is there any graph (pattern) wich show relation between number of DNS
request and hardware power.


Thanks


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Old 11-05-2010, 08:51 PM
Allan Wind
 
Default New DNS serwer - hardware

On 2010-11-05T22:29:01, pch0317 wrote:
> How to check number of DNS request to current DNS machines (how to
> check current DNS load).

The first step is to identify the dns server (software like bind)
you use, then you want to consult the documentation for said
software to answer your question of logging capability.

If that does not work identify peak load on the current hosts
(assuming they only run the dns server). Then you can sample
network traffic (tcpdump) and identify number of dns requests
either via tcpdump or something like wireshare.

> How to match new server components like processor, memory and other
> to this load.

You have your current servers as 1 data point. You will probably
be able to find processor speed mapping between your current CPU
and the ones you are considering (spec mark or similar).

dns is a distributed database so you need to figure out what the
working set of records are. Another option, given that memory is
relatively inexpensive, is to test various configurations with
the new server in production rotation. dns is a network service,
if you plan on increasing load make sure you have sufficient
bandwith.

> Is there any graph (pattern) wich show relation between number of
> DNS request and hardware power.

I doubt you will find something directly related. You want to
look for something specific to your dns server (software), and
match as many other variables like os as possible.

Good luck!


/Allan
--
Allan Wind
Life Integrity, LLC
<http://lifeintegrity.com>


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Old 11-06-2010, 12:51 PM
Stan Hoeppner
 
Default New DNS serwer - hardware

pch0317 put forth on 11/5/2010 4:29 PM:
> Hi
>
> I must buy new DNS servers (hardware) to our company.
> Now DNS (bind on debian) works on PC machine (3 identical NS servers).
>
> How to check number of DNS request to current DNS machines (how to check
> current DNS load).
> How to match new server components like processor, memory and other to
> this load.
> Is there any graph (pattern) wich show relation between number of DNS
> request and hardware power.

http://www.bind9.net/manual/bind/9.3.2/Bv9ARM.ch02.html#id2547108

How many domains (zones) do you currently serve? Do you want live zone
changes without having to restart your DNS daemon? Are you and ISP or
other (smaller) org? Do host only static zones or do you also host
dynamic updates (like dyndns.org)? Do you host DNSSEC signed zones?

If you're simply hosting static zones, even 250,000+ zones, a single
dual core 2GHz machine with 4GB ram and a single 10k RPM SAS disk would
be overkill. Serving DNS doesn't require a very powerful machine unless
you're hosting millions of domains or doing DNSSEC.

If you use something like PowerDNS instead of Bind, you can get by with
even lower end hardware (memory) as it uses a database backend instead
of static text files. This is great as you can do live changes via a
web interface if you wish (this is something you have to build from FOSS
components--it's not part of PowerDNS).

This thread, while very old, is educational. Note the age of the
hardware and software involved, circa 2002-2003:

http://mailman.powerdns.com/pipermail/pdns-users/2003-December/000931.html

--
Stan


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