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Old 07-18-2010, 02:43 PM
Mark
 
Default cloning/saving system

On Sun, Jul 18, 2010 at 6:14 AM, Jordon Bedwell <jordon@envygeeks.com> wrote:

On 7/18/2010 7:20 AM, John Lindsay wrote:

> I am currently using debian lenny as my primary computer. It's a Dell

> Dimension 8300, P4, 3.4G with 1G Ram. 60G HD.

> I also have a Dell Optiplex GX620 which currently has win7 on a 300G HD

> with 1.5g ram. I will be removing files from the win7 and storing them

> on DVDs and installing Debian on it. How can I clone/transfer my current

> working machine with all it's files/programs like thunderbird/iceweasel

> etc to the GX520 and still retain a working system?

>

> John

>

> PS I have file backup manager 'Pybackpack' currently running but I don't

> think that is what I want.

>

>



Backup Windows first, put the old HD into the new computer, boot up to

Linux (you might have to edit Grub at this point) then dd the MBR to the

new drive on the new computer, then sync the rest of the drive either

using rsync, copy or dd. Then move the HD's back in their original

places and edit grub again.

Or you could just use Clonezilla.
 
Old 07-18-2010, 11:57 PM
"H.S."
 
Default cloning/saving system

On 18/07/10 09:14 AM, Jordon Bedwell wrote:



Backup Windows first, put the old HD into the new computer, boot up to
Linux (you might have to edit Grub at this point) then dd the MBR to the
new drive on the new computer,


Regarding the dd'ing of grub, why not just do (after booting in to the
system as you described):

# grub-install /dev/sdX

where /dev/sdX is the new drive?







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Old 07-19-2010, 07:40 AM
Klistvud
 
Default cloning/saving system

Dne, 18. 07. 2010 16:43:32 je Mark napisal(a):

>
> Backup Windows first, put the old HD into the new computer, boot up
to
> Linux (you might have to edit Grub at this point) then dd the MBR
to the
> new drive on the new computer, then sync the rest of the drive
either

> using rsync, copy or dd. Then move the HD's back in their original
> places and edit grub again.
>

Or you could just use Clonezilla.




Even GParted apparently has an option to "copy partitions" these days.
Of course, it must not be run from one of the disks you're trying to
clone, those have to be unmounted. A live system would be fine. But,
whatever of the above methods you choose, you should be aware that it
will also clone fstab, partition labels, UUIDs and so on - so you
should plan ahead to change that manually afterwards, if needed.


--
Regards,

Klistvud
Certifiable Loonix User #481801
http://bufferoverflow.tiddlyspot.com


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Old 07-19-2010, 09:41 PM
John Lindsay
 
Default cloning/saving system

John Lindsay wrote:
I am currently using debian lenny as my primary computer. It's a Dell
Dimension 8300, P4, 3.4G with 1G Ram. 60G HD.
I also have a Dell Optiplex GX620 which currently has win7 on a 300G
HD with 1.5g ram. I will be removing files from the win7 and storing
them on DVDs and installing Debian on it. How can I clone/transfer my
current working machine with all it's files/programs like
thunderbird/iceweasel etc to the GX520 and still retain a working system?


John

PS I have file backup manager 'Pybackpack' currently running but I
don't think that is what I want.



Thanks for all the info on the above. "SHE WHO MUST BE OBEYED" has
persuaded me NOT to do as I planned. She likes the system as is and
refuses to let me change it. Thanks anyway as I did learn a lot by
following up the suggestions on clonezilla etc.



John


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Old 07-21-2010, 12:41 PM
"B. Alexander"
 
Default cloning/saving system

John,

For future reference, if you want to have a basic clone
(not an exact copy) of a machine, what I end up doing (which allows me
to provision a machine in about 15 minutes) uses the following
procedure:

1. Create a package list on the old machine [1]


******* dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall > pkglist.hostname

2. (Optional) Capture the drive layout [1]

***** df > driveinfo.hostname
***** df -h >> driveinfo.hostname
***** fdisk -l >> driveinfo.hostname



3. Build the new machine with the netinst or businesscard cd. When
asked what type of system to build (package selection), uncheck all the
boxes.

Reboot into your new system, copy pkglist.hostname from step 1 onto the machine. Do the following:


***** dpkg --set-selections < pkglist.hostname
***** apt-get dselect-upgrade

This should give you a system with a nearly identical set of packages that you can then tweak to your hearts content.

[1]
You can actually back these files up and have a pool of different
"types" of machine. For instance, I have a workstation packagelist, a
laptop list, as well as lists for the various types of bastion hosts in
my network, including a wiki host (mediawiki), firewall, backup server,
etc.


--b

On Mon, Jul 19, 2010 at 5:41 PM, John Lindsay <jclind@sentex.net> wrote:

John Lindsay wrote:


I am currently using debian lenny as my primary computer. It's a Dell Dimension 8300, P4, 3.4G with 1G Ram. 60G HD.

I also have a Dell Optiplex GX620 which currently has win7 on a 300G HD with 1.5g ram. I will be removing files from the win7 and storing them on DVDs and installing Debian on it. How can I clone/transfer my current working machine with all it's files/programs like thunderbird/iceweasel etc to the GX520 and still retain a working system?




John



PS I have file backup manager 'Pybackpack' currently running but I don't think that is what I want.






Thanks for all the info on the above. "SHE WHO MUST BE OBEYED" has persuaded me NOT to do as I planned. She likes the system as is and refuses to let me change it. Thanks anyway as I did learn a lot by *following up the suggestions on clonezilla etc.






John





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Old 07-21-2010, 01:11 PM
"H.S."
 
Default cloning/saving system

On 21/07/10 08:41 AM, B. Alexander wrote:



3. Build the new machine with the netinst or businesscard cd. When asked
what type of system to build (package selection), uncheck all the boxes.

Reboot into your new system, copy pkglist.hostname from step 1 onto the
machine. Do the following:


I think you are also supposed to change your sources.list file at this
point (for example if your machine was using Debian Unstable but if you
used a Stable or Testing installer).





dpkg --set-selections< pkglist.hostname
apt-get dselect-upgrade

This should give you a system with a nearly identical set of packages that
you can then tweak to your hearts content.


I am not sure what you think about /home, but usually that is the more
important consideration for me. What I usually do is:
1. Make note of the UIDs & GIDs of the users (or the order in which they
were created). 'ls -nl /home' lists those.
2. Make a backup of /var as well to restore users' mail (in /var/mail)
and cronjobs (in /var/spool/cron/crontabs) and perhaps at jobs (in
/var/spool/cront).


Finally, backing up /etc and restoring it later prevents you from having
to do all the configurations again.




[1] You can actually back these files up and have a pool of different
"types" of machine. For instance, I have a workstation packagelist, a laptop
list, as well as lists for the various types of bastion hosts in my network,
including a wiki host (mediawiki), firewall, backup server, etc.


All good points.

Thanks.



--

Please reply to this list only. I read this list on its corresponding
newsgroup on gmane.org. Replies sent to my email address are just
filtered to a folder in my mailbox and get periodically deleted without
ever having been read.


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Old 07-21-2010, 02:55 PM
"B. Alexander"
 
Default cloning/saving system

On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 9:11 AM, H.S. <hs.samix@gmail.com> wrote:

On 21/07/10 08:41 AM, B. Alexander wrote:






3. Build the new machine with the netinst or businesscard cd. When asked

what type of system to build (package selection), uncheck all the boxes.



Reboot into your new system, copy pkglist.hostname from step 1 onto the

machine. Do the following:




I think you are also supposed to change your sources.list file at this point (for example if your machine was using Debian Unstable but if you used a Stable or Testing installer).


True, I neglected to mention this. I usually copy at least /etc/apt/apt.conf, /etc/apt/sources.list (I use a universal one, so one size fits all), and /etc/apt/sources.list.d over.
*


* * * dpkg --set-selections< *pkglist.hostname

* * * apt-get dselect-upgrade



This should give you a system with a nearly identical set of packages that

you can then tweak to your hearts content.




I am not sure what you think about /home, but usually that is the more important consideration for me. What I usually do is:

1. Make note of the UIDs & GIDs of the users (or the order in which they were created). 'ls -nl /home' lists those.

2. Make a backup of /var as well to restore users' mail (in /var/mail) and cronjobs (in /var/spool/cron/crontabs) and perhaps at jobs (in /var/spool/cront).

Good points. I was under the assumption that you would not be transferring data over from the old to the new, so I didn't consider it. Of course, if you are managing more than a few boxes, you also might want to consider a configuration management tool like cfengine or puppet. Then you could "script" all of your UIDs and GIDs as well as other configuration details. For instance, I have a list of "essential" packages (essential for me) that I install on every box. With cfengine, I can automagically install them as well as edit/modify that list in one place.

*
Finally, backing up /etc and restoring it later prevents you from having to do all the configurations again.

Be careful with that. Especially if you are "cloning" a box that has been around for a while. Carte blanche copying of /etc can lead to problems. There is the problem of "etc drift," even with a fairly recently built box.

*



[1] You can actually back these files up and have a pool of different

"types" of machine. For instance, I have a workstation packagelist, a laptop

list, as well as lists for the various types of bastion hosts in my network,

including a wiki host (mediawiki), firewall, backup server, etc.




All good points.



Thanks.

--b
 

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