FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Debian > Debian User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 07-09-2010, 02:19 PM
Christian Jaeger
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Hello

I'm trying to get a UMTS/HSPA/HSAP+ usb stick from Bell Canada working
with their network. I'm on Lenny, with a 2.6.33.6 kernel compiled from
kernel.org.

At first I'm "activating" the stick through that usual "mount then
eject the flash volume" handling, and reloading the usbserial kernel
module manually since it doesn't seem to pick up the change of the
product id by itself (wondering why not):

#!/bin/bash

mount /dev/disk/by-id/usb-Novatel_Mass_Storage_012067000784101-0:0
/mnt/usb-Novatel_Mass_Storage_012067000784101-0:0 || exit 1
umount /mnt/usb-Novatel_Mass_Storage_012067000784101-0:0
eject /dev/disk/by-id/usb-Novatel_Mass_Storage_012067000784101-0:0
(
while true; do
sleep 0.5
if lsusb |grep -q 1410:7030; then
exit
fi
done
)
rmmod option
rmmod usbserial
sleep 0.1
modprobe usbserial vendor=0x1410 product=0x7030
modprobe option


BTW loading the "option" module leads to a message 'option: v0.7.2:USB
Driver for GSM modems', but interestingly /dev/ttyUSB0 already exists
with only usbserial loaded and I wonder what the kernel should be
doing apart from handling that tty? The "real" stuff is being done by
pppd in userspace, right? So what does "option" do?


/etc/ppp/peers/bell3g:

# This optionfile was generated by pppconfig 2.3.18.
#
#
hide-password
noauth
noccp
connect "/usr/sbin/chat -v -f /etc/chatscripts/bell3g"
debug
/dev/ttyUSB0
115200
defaultroute
noipdefault
user replace_with_your_login_name
remotename bell3g
ipparam bell3g

usepeerdns

I've added the line with noccp in the above file, following a
suggestion from
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-users/2008-January/133699.html,
which seems to have eliminated a "pppd[18364]: Protocol-Reject for
'Compression Control Protocol' (0x80fd) received" error.


/etc/chatscripts/bell3g:

# This chatfile was generated by pppconfig 2.3.18.
# Please do not delete any of the comments. Pppconfig needs them.
#
# ispauth PAP
# abortstring
ABORT BUSY ABORT 'NO CARRIER' ABORT VOICE ABORT 'NO DIALTONE' ABORT
'NO DIAL TONE' ABORT 'NO ANSWER' ABORT DELAYED
# modeminit
' ATZ
# ispnumber
OK-AT-OK ATDT*99#
# ispconnect
CONNECT dc
# prelogin

# ispname
# isppassword
# postlogin

# end of pppconfig stuff


Running

pon bell3g

now leads to the following output in /var/log/syslog:

Jul 9 10:11:14 novo pppd[18881]: pppd 2.4.4 started by root, uid 0
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (BUSY)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (NO CARRIER)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (VOICE)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (NO DIALTONE)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (NO DIAL TONE)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (NO ANSWER)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: abort on (DELAYED)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: send (ATZ^M)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: expect (OK)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: ATZ^M^M
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: OK
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: -- got it
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: send (ATDT*99#^M)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: expect (CONNECT)
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: ^M
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: ATDT*99#^M^M
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: CONNECT
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: -- got it
Jul 9 10:11:15 novo chat[18884]: send (d)
Jul 9 10:11:16 novo pppd[18881]: Serial connection established.
Jul 9 10:11:16 novo pppd[18881]: using channel 5
Jul 9 10:11:16 novo pppd[18881]: Using interface ppp1
Jul 9 10:11:16 novo pppd[18881]: Connect: ppp1 <--> /dev/ttyUSB0
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP ConfReq id=0x1 <asyncmap
0x0> <magic 0xe741e65a> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [LCP ConfReq id=0x7 <asyncmap
0x0> <auth chap MD5> <magic 0x33f003c> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP ConfNak id=0x7 <auth pap>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [LCP ConfAck id=0x1 <asyncmap
0x0> <magic 0xe741e65a> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [LCP ConfReq id=0x8 <asyncmap
0x0> <auth pap> <magic 0x33f003c> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP ConfAck id=0x8 <asyncmap
0x0> <auth pap> <magic 0x33f003c> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP EchoReq id=0x0 magic=0xe741e65a]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: sent [PAP AuthReq id=0x1
user="replace_with_your_login_name" password=<hidden>]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [LCP DiscReq id=0x9 magic=0x33f003c]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [LCP EchoRep id=0x0
magic=0x33f003c e7 41 e6 5a]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [PAP AuthAck id=0x1 ""]
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: PAP authentication succeeded
Jul 9 10:11:17 novo pppd[18881]: sent [IPCP ConfReq id=0x1 <compress
VJ 0f 01> <addr 0.0.0.0> <ms-dns1 0.0.0.0> <ms-dns3 0.0.0.0>]
Jul 9 10:11:18 novo pppd[18881]: rcvd [IPCP ConfNak id=0x1 <ms-dns1
10.11.12.13> <ms-dns3 10.11.12.14> <ms-wins 10.11.12.13> <ms-wins
10.11.12.14>]
Jul 9 10:11:18 novo pppd[18881]: sent [IPCP ConfReq id=0x2 <compress
VJ 0f 01> <addr 0.0.0.0> <ms-dns1 10.11.12.13> <ms-dns3 10.11.12.14>]
Jul 9 10:11:45 novo last message repeated 9 times
Jul 9 10:11:47 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP EchoReq id=0x1 magic=0xe741e65a]
Jul 9 10:11:48 novo pppd[18881]: IPCP: timeout sending Config-Requests
Jul 9 10:11:48 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP TermReq id=0x2 "No
network protocols running"]
Jul 9 10:11:51 novo pppd[18881]: sent [LCP TermReq id=0x3 "No
network protocols running"]
Jul 9 10:11:54 novo pppd[18881]: Connection terminated.
Jul 9 10:11:55 novo pppd[18881]: Modem hangup
Jul 9 10:11:55 novo pppd[18881]: Exit.


Also wondering about this user stuff, I didn't get any information
from Bell about user/password, maybe there is none (SIM card being
enough authentification)? Would I have to eliminate that somehow?

Thanks for your help
Christian.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: AANLkTinx7EHlsZnLdgqTtwB8EcuIOJvnBqfojgs0HTIS@mail .gmail.com">http://lists.debian.org/AANLkTinx7EHlsZnLdgqTtwB8EcuIOJvnBqfojgs0HTIS@mail .gmail.com
 
Old 11-09-2010, 02:34 PM
Christian Jaeger
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Following up to myself on what I did, because people keep asking me
privatly about this.

No, I didn't get it to work with plain pppd, although I mostly stopped
looking into that. Instead I first tried with Ubuntu, got it partially
working (usb modeswitch didn't work reliably), so installed another
laptop with Debian testing and network manager. Network manager can
handle it on first try *once the modem has been usb mode switched*,
but that latter was a real problem, seems the usb mode switch tool
cannot do it reliably, it only switched in some quite rare cases where
the timing of plugging it +-quickly in succession was the reason to
make it work.

So I instead improved my own scripts instead, ending up with the 3
scripts I'm attaching. I've placed them all in /root/local/sbin/, and
changed the file /lib/udev/rules.d/40-usb_modeswitch.rules to contain
the following (replace for the line that is now prefixed with
"#orig"):

# Novatel Wireless devices
#CJ
#orig ATTRS{idVendor}=="1410", ATTRS{idProduct}=="5010",
RUN+="usb_modeswitch '%b/%k'"
ATTRS{idVendor}=="1410", ATTRS{idProduct}=="5010",
RUN+="/root/local/sbin/bellstickactivateudevhack '%b/%k'"
#/CJ

Note that this file is from the usb-modeswitch-data package; it might
be cleaner to create a new file separate from that package instead
(but taking priority over the latter) to make it work regardless
whether usb-modeswitch is installed or not, but considering this is a
hack I didn't care to try.

Note that:
- my above mode switch hack is slow, it takes almost 30 seconds until
the modem is ready
- the 10 second delay in the bellstickactivateudevhack script is
necessary, I guess because something else triggered from udev has to
finish running first; of course this just works around a problem I
don't know and hence a total hack

Also, I've also still got the following problems, which I think are
not related to my hack:

- I already get the connection up the first time I insert the stick,
*but* the connection stops working after about 5-10 seconds (the LED
on the stick goes back to slow flashing mode, which I gather is an
indication for not being connected; network manager still shows it
connected at that point; stopping the connection in network manager
then reactivating it does not work, I have to unplug and replug the
stick); only after a couple fresh tries the connection stays up (it
takes from ~2-10 attempts). Once it stays up, it stays up indefinitely
(as long as I stay in the same location), but of course this is a
major pain, it wastes several minutes of my time. I wonder if it's
related to temperature, since the stick gets quite warm (it eats about
2 W of power all the time even when no transfers are being made),
maybe it does not work right when cold; or maybe the linux drivers
(i.e. network manager) don't implement dealing with base stations
correctly, like they should resend some kind of reaffirmations or so
and don't, and hence require me to kind of do the reaffirmation
manually.

- somehow reception is pretty weak, there are many places where I
don't get a connection where GSM phone calls with my mobile work just
fine (admittedly the latter is with a different provider, but I don't
think that Bell have such a bad network in comparison; maybe the
modern data networks just need closer proximity to the base stations
than GSM).

So I wonder whether the stick is just bad hardware or broken and I
should return it (difficult to do while saying I'm running it under
Linux, I guess?), or whether there is a software solution. I'm tempted
to get rid of it and use a modern mobile phone with bluetooth
tethering instead.

Christian.
 
Old 11-27-2010, 07:26 PM
Christian Jaeger
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Following up to myself again, in the meantime I think I've narrowed
down the problem with my disconnects a bit:

It seems that I'm loosing connection whenever the stick changes
connection mode, or at least when it changes from UMTS to HSPA or
HSUPA. Meaning, it connects with UMTS and I'm getting internet access
until it changes ~30 seconds later to one of the latter, then the
internet connection is broken, disconnecting and reconnecting with the
network manager applet won't work, I have to unplug and replug the
stick for another attempt. Seems only if I'm lucky and it decides to
stay on UMTS that I'm getting continuous internet access. This seems
consistent with my observation that I'm often not having any problem
at all in remote areas, whereas in the city core it's worst (meaning,
in areas that only have UMTS access points there is no problem at
all).

Thanks for any ideas on how to solve this (I'll take that to the
network manager developers, too--but then, maybe I'll have a phone
connetion up and running before that and drop it).

Christian.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: AANLkTikA_Vc3xvw+Btbh4vuAJyyca4-65ssVdidE7jdg@mail.gmail.com">http://lists.debian.org/AANLkTikA_Vc3xvw+Btbh4vuAJyyca4-65ssVdidE7jdg@mail.gmail.com
 
Old 05-30-2011, 06:44 AM
Christian Jaeger
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Another update in my quest to get that UMTS modem work properly:

Bell technical support told me that I should run a firmware upgrade on
the stick (and gave me a link to the exact file). Of course that's a
windows .exe. I tried to run it in a second hand computer store that
let me plug in my Bell stick, but it didn't work, probably because I
didn't install the driver beforehand, the installer and upgrade
utility conflicted with each other. So I gave up for some time.

Now I've finally gotten an own computer with Windows (XP), so I
installed the modem first, then ran the firmware upgrade. Both worked
without problems. Also, on Windows the modem doesn't seem to exhibit
that disconnect problem. Then I tried again on Debian, and nothing
changed, disconnection on first try. Duh.

So, if anyone knows what's left that I could try (well I'll try
contacting some network manager people), or knows which USB UMTS modem
works on Debian in Canada (with Bell), please tell.

Thanks
Christian.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: BANLkTin1A53W_HGPYyq=VR58K2deDW18Rg@mail.gmail.com ">http://lists.debian.org/BANLkTin1A53W_HGPYyq=VR58K2deDW18Rg@mail.gmail.com
 
Old 05-30-2011, 02:20 PM
Jasper Noe
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Christian Jaeger <chrjae <at> gmail.com> writes:

>
> Another update in my quest to get that UMTS modem work properly:
>
> Bell technical support told me that I should run a firmware upgrade on
> the stick (and gave me a link to the exact file). Of course that's a
> windows .exe. I tried to run it in a second hand computer store that
> let me plug in my Bell stick, but it didn't work, probably because I
> didn't install the driver beforehand, the installer and upgrade
> utility conflicted with each other. So I gave up for some time.
>
> Now I've finally gotten an own computer with Windows (XP), so I
> installed the modem first, then ran the firmware upgrade. Both worked
> without problems. Also, on Windows the modem doesn't seem to exhibit
> that disconnect problem. Then I tried again on Debian, and nothing
> changed, disconnection on first try. Duh.
>
> So, if anyone knows what's left that I could try (well I'll try
> contacting some network manager people), or knows which USB UMTS modem
> works on Debian in Canada (with Bell), please tell.
>
> Thanks
> Christian.
>
>
Reading your first post on this issue I see that you remove the option module in
favor of usbserial. That advice is all over the net. Are you still doing that ?
I think it is -basically- wrong: 'option' is the specialised driver for this and
many other 3g modems. 'usbserial' is -only- a generic driver on which you can
fall back if-all-else-fails. ( I am citing the author of usbserial )

I suggest that you go back to the beginning, probably a clean, fresh install of
Squeeze, stick the modem in and see what happens. Or a live cd, or, ..

In Squeeze usbmodeswitch is standard.
Then the option module should grab the modem.
The module creates /dev/ttyUSB*

After that the dialling: that is specific for your provider.

HTH, --Jasper.






--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: loom.20110530T160259-360@post.gmane.org">http://lists.debian.org/loom.20110530T160259-360@post.gmane.org
 
Old 05-30-2011, 02:36 PM
Jasper Noë
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Christian Jaeger <chrjae <at> gmail.com> writes:

>
> Another update in my quest to get that UMTS modem work properly:
>
> Bell technical support told me that I should run a firmware upgrade on
> the stick (and gave me a link to the exact file). Of course that's a
> windows .exe. I tried to run it in a second hand computer store that
> let me plug in my Bell stick, but it didn't work, probably because I
> didn't install the driver beforehand, the installer and upgrade
> utility conflicted with each other. So I gave up for some time.
>
> Now I've finally gotten an own computer with Windows (XP), so I
> installed the modem first, then ran the firmware upgrade. Both worked
> without problems. Also, on Windows the modem doesn't seem to exhibit
> that disconnect problem. Then I tried again on Debian, and nothing
> changed, disconnection on first try. Duh.
>
> So, if anyone knows what's left that I could try (well I'll try
> contacting some network manager people), or knows which USB UMTS modem
> works on Debian in Canada (with Bell), please tell.
>
> Thanks
> Christian.
>
>
Reading your first post on this issue I see that you remove the option
module in favor of usbserial. That advice is all over the net. Are you
still doing that ?
I think it is -basically- wrong: 'option' is the specialised driver for
this and many other 3g modems. 'usbserial' is -only- a generic driver on
which you can fall back if-all-else-fails. ( I am citing the author of
usbserial )


I suggest that you go back to the beginning, probably a clean, fresh
install of Squeeze, stick the modem in and see what happens. Or a live
cd, or, ..


In Squeeze usbmodeswitch is standard.
Then the option module should grab the modem.
The module creates /dev/ttyUSB*

After that the dialling: that is specific for your provider.

HTH, --Jasper.




--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

Archive: 4DE3AB57.7090400@xs4all.nl">http://lists.debian.org/4DE3AB57.7090400@xs4all.nl
 
Old 05-30-2011, 03:07 PM
Pablo Sánchez
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Christian , Dan William's blog at http://blogs.gnome.org/dcbw/ .
He is a NM developer .

Good info there .

Pablo Sánchez .



Another update in my quest to get that UMTS modem work properly:

Bell technical support told me that I should run a firmware upgrade on
the stick (and gave me a link to the exact file). Of course that's a
windows .exe. I tried to run it in a second hand computer store that
let me plug in my Bell stick, but it didn't work, probably because I
didn't install the driver beforehand, the installer and upgrade
utility conflicted with each other. So I gave up for some time.

Now I've finally gotten an own computer with Windows (XP), so I
installed the modem first, then ran the firmware upgrade. Both worked
without problems. Also, on Windows the modem doesn't seem to exhibit
that disconnect problem. Then I tried again on Debian, and nothing
changed, disconnection on first try. Duh.

So, if anyone knows what's left that I could try (well I'll try
contacting some network manager people), or knows which USB UMTS modem
works on Debian in Canada (with Bell), please tell.

Thanks
Christian.





--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

Archive: 4DE3B2A4.3060600@adinet.com.uy">http://lists.debian.org/4DE3B2A4.3060600@adinet.com.uy
 
Old 05-30-2011, 05:22 PM
Christian Jaeger
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

> Reading your first post on this issue I see that you remove the option module in
> favor of usbserial. That advice is all over the net. Are you still doing that ?
> I think it is -basically- wrong: 'option' is the specialised driver for this and
> many other 3g modems. 'usbserial' is -only- a generic driver on which you can
> fall back if-all-else-fails. ( I am citing the author of usbserial )

I think I'm only removing the modules so they can be reloaded
afterwards, i.e. to reset their state. At least I think it worked
equally both with reloading option afterwards and without.

Now, option is actually loaded when I connect; and, interestingly it's
not at the top of lsmod output, and, as I realize now, my own
initialization scripts are not even called anymore as it seems. I'm
quite confused; on 2011-03-20
/lib/udev/rules.d/40-usb_modeswitch.rules was changed to a version
that doesn't call my hook. I don't have any record that I did this
myself, and don't remember anything about it, I can only conclude that
some Debian package upgrade did it. Sigh. (Ok I know that /lib isn't
/etc, but then why are those files in /lib? Or do /etc/udev/ files
override those in /lib/udev?)

It seems the option module is actually being used by network manager
(directly or indirectly), since lsmod shows its use count going up to
2 when I'm connecting, and dropping back to 0 when I unplug the stick.

option 12918 2
usb_wwan 6147 1 option
usbserial 21120 7 option,usb_wwan


> I suggest that you go back to the beginning, probably a clean, fresh install of
> Squeeze, stick the modem in and see what happens. Or a live cd, or, ..

I've just booted from a current Ubuntu live image. The exact same
thing happens once it connects: 20 seconds after connection is up it
is being dropped again. (This happened 2 times.) The difference to my
Debian setup is that about 4 further times I tried to up the
connection, it didn't even enter up state; network manager would just
show "connected", but the stick would still blink its LED instead of
going to light it up constantly as it would when connected, then a
couple seconds later network manager would say "disconnected"; after
that no connection attempt succeeds, I unplug+replug the stick to try
again. So it's just worse...

> In Squeeze usbmodeswitch is standard.

Yes, but it didn't work reliably in Ubuntu back when I tried a year
ago, and not at all in Squeeze (testing back then), which led me to
write my own switching scripts.

When I tried it on the newer Ubuntu today, watching syslog and nm
popup messages, it seems usbmode switching is reliable (and fast, in
~2 seconds), but as mentioned it then fails to connect at all in the
majority of cases. Actually I think that's exactly what happened a
year ago, and I probably just mis-concluded that usb mode switching
wasn't reliable on Ubuntu, where in fact the switching itself seems to
work fine, but somehow in about 2/3 of cases leaves it in a state that
doesn't allow it to connect.

How do you connect, using nm or something else?

Well I'm also going to try a Debian live image, to confirm whether
withoug my own scripts it works the same.

Christian.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: BANLkTi=NejD82GBKQi48LX7KLhvPCDERTQ@mail.gmail.com ">http://lists.debian.org/BANLkTi=NejD82GBKQi48LX7KLhvPCDERTQ@mail.gmail.com
 
Old 05-30-2011, 11:08 PM
Jasper Noë
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

Not sure if I can be of much further help to you.


Reading your first post on this issue I see that you remove the option module in
favor of usbserial. That advice is all over the net. Are you still doing that ?
I think it is -basically- wrong: 'option' is the specialised driver for this and
many other 3g modems. 'usbserial' is -only- a generic driver on which you can
fall back if-all-else-fails. ( I am citing the author of usbserial )


I think I'm only removing the modules so they can be reloaded
afterwards, i.e. to reset their state. At least I think it worked
equally both with reloading option afterwards and without.

Now, option is actually loaded when I connect; and, interestingly it's


The module is loaded when you insert the modem


not at the top of lsmod output, and, as I realize now, my own
initialization scripts are not even called anymore as it seems. I'm
quite confused; on 2011-03-20
/lib/udev/rules.d/40-usb_modeswitch.rules was changed to a version
that doesn't call my hook. I don't have any record that I did this
myself, and don't remember anything about it, I can only conclude that
some Debian package upgrade did it. Sigh. (Ok I know that /lib isn't
/etc, but then why are those files in /lib? Or do /etc/udev/ files
override those in /lib/udev?)

It seems the option module is actually being used by network manager
(directly or indirectly), since lsmod shows its use count going up to
2 when I'm connecting, and dropping back to 0 when I unplug the stick.

option 12918 2
usb_wwan 6147 1 option
usbserial 21120 7 option,usb_wwan



I am worried about this 'usb_wwan', it seems to do exactly what 'option'
is supposed to do. rmmod usb_wwan ? Is it nm doing this ?






I suggest that you go back to the beginning, probably a clean, fresh install of
Squeeze, stick the modem in and see what happens. Or a live cd, or, ..


I've just booted from a current Ubuntu live image. The exact same
thing happens once it connects: 20 seconds after connection is up it
is being dropped again. (This happened 2 times.) The difference to my
Debian setup is that about 4 further times I tried to up the
connection, it didn't even enter up state; network manager would just
show "connected", but the stick would still blink its LED instead of
going to light it up constantly as it would when connected, then a
couple seconds later network manager would say "disconnected"; after
that no connection attempt succeeds, I unplug+replug the stick to try
again. So it's just worse...


In Squeeze usbmodeswitch is standard.


Yes, but it didn't work reliably in Ubuntu back when I tried a year
ago, and not at all in Squeeze (testing back then), which led me to
write my own switching scripts.

When I tried it on the newer Ubuntu today, watching syslog and nm
popup messages, it seems usbmode switching is reliable (and fast, in
~2 seconds), but as mentioned it then fails to connect at all in the
majority of cases. Actually I think that's exactly what happened a
year ago, and I probably just mis-concluded that usb mode switching
wasn't reliable on Ubuntu, where in fact the switching itself seems to
work fine, but somehow in about 2/3 of cases leaves it in a state that
doesn't allow it to connect.


The modeswitching is just the first stage, a very annoying hurdle, it
has nothing to do with connecting. ( but indeed, if it does not work it
"won't allow you to connect" although that sounds confused to me. )


The second stage is the loading of the proper module which makes the
device accessible. ( presence of /dev/ttyUSB* )


Now we can 'talk' to this thing. It works like an old fashioned
telephoneline-modem with 'AT-' commands, we can tell it to 'dial',
disconnect, scan for available networks, measure signalstrength etc.


One might use 'minicom' to play with it.
Or use 'chat', which is part of the package 'ppp', to write scripts that
manipulate the modem.




How do you connect, using nm or something else?


I avoid nm like the plague, but that said, if it is ready it might be
beautiful. I prefer low-level tools.


Like wvdial. Run 'wvdialconf' -if- the modem is accessible. And then
tweak /etc/wvdial.conf .


I do not own a 3g modem myself, but over time I have made several of
them working, on debian systems.




Well I'm also going to try a Debian live image, to confirm whether
withoug my own scripts it works the same.


I am curious.



Christian.


bye, --Jasper.
( not sure if I hit your problem at all, but since the hardware is
working in windows, it should ... )



--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

Archive: 4DE42360.3040101@xs4all.nl">http://lists.debian.org/4DE42360.3040101@xs4all.nl
 
Old 06-11-2011, 06:19 PM
Christian Jaeger
 
Default How to get Bell Canada 3G USB network up?

>> option * * * * * * * * 12918 *2
>> usb_wwan * * * * * * * *6147 *1 option
>> usbserial * * * * * * *21120 *7 option,usb_wwan
>>
>
> I am worried about this 'usb_wwan', it seems to do exactly what 'option' is
> supposed to do. rmmod usb_wwan ? Is it nm doing this ?

As you can see from the lsmod output, usb_wwan is required by option.

>>> I suggest that you go back to the beginning, probably a clean, fresh
>>> install of
>>> Squeeze, stick the modem in and see what happens. Or a live cd, or, ..

So I've done that now (fresh squeeze install on my netbook). It's just
like in the Ubuntu live system: the modem is being recognized and
usb-modeswitched out of the box (some of the times), configuring the
country/provider makes it work, but same story: (1) half the times I
plug in the modem, it won't work at all (modeswitching works and it
shows up in the nm menu, but choosing 'activate' just spins for a
couple seconds but does nothing); (2) if (1) worked, then just as with
my hand hacked older Debian setup, after 20 seconds it will loose
connection about in half of the cases.

BTW lately I've cared to observe the exact moment when it 'crashes'.
It is 20 seconds after connection initiation and really exactly when
it switches from "U" (umts) to "H" (HSPA).

> The modeswitching is just the first stage, a very annoying hurdle, it has
> nothing to do with connecting.

Yes I know, but as I've described, there must be *something* in the
way that Debian's/Ubuntus builtin usbmodeswitch works that leaves the
modem nonworkable in half the cases. Whereas with my own modeswitching
script that's never an issue.

> ( but indeed, if it does not work it "won't
> allow you to connect" although that sounds confused to me. )

(To help explain what I wrote above:

* the modem LED is off after plugging it into the USB port and before
usb modeswitching happens
* after the mode switch runs, the modem LED is blinking in blue
(sometimes it inserts a lone blink in green between the blue ones, no
idea what it means)
* when the modem is connected, the modem LED is lighting up in constant blue
* when there has been traffic, the modem LED color changes to green,
orange, yellow or purple (I don't know what these colors mean, it
might indicate the network speed), but it stays lit up constantly
* when the modem is disconnected (either on purpose through the nm
menu, or when I move to a place with no network coverage (metro), or
when it ' 'crashes' at the 20 second point), it goes back to blue
blinking

Thus I can see when the usb mode switch happened because I see the
blue blinking. Which the fresh Debian install / Ubuntu live system do
100% of the time; only, in what seems to be exactly half of the cases,
choosing connect from the nm menu (which I have to do, I haven't
configured nm to connect automatically) will not bring the connection
up. Which I can see both because nm just goes back to disconnected
state after a couple seconds, and the modem never goes from blinking
to constantly lit mode.)

>
> The second stage is the loading of the proper module which makes the device
> accessible. ( presence of /dev/ttyUSB* )
>
> Now we can 'talk' to this thing. It works like an old fashioned
> telephoneline-modem with 'AT-' commands, we can tell it to 'dial',
> disconnect, scan for available networks, measure signalstrength etc.
> One might use 'minicom' to play with it.

Yeah I know, I used those a bit in the old 56k telephone modem times.
But I haven't really tried to find a command list for 3G modems.

(Also, I'm not sure what to do: how would I bring ppp up in such a
manual scenario, i.e. from minicom? Also, in the old times, once ppp
is up, the computer normally wouldn't send AT commands to the modem,
except to interrupt ppp stream to bring it down. Since nowadays modems
need to transmit state changes like the change from UMTS to HSPA, I
wonder how that happens. In any case, I've got no idea what to look
out for, and also, even if I knew to pinpoint it down to a particular
feature, I'd have to observe what nm is doing, too, to know what else
to try.)

>
> Or use 'chat', which is part of the package 'ppp', to write scripts that
> manipulate the modem.
>
>>
>> How do you connect, using nm or something else?
>
> I avoid nm like the plague, but that said, if it is ready it might be
> beautiful. I prefer low-level tools.

Yeah I tried to go with the low-level tools too, at first, then after
being unsuccessful gave in and went with nm. (I might try to find the
mails I sent during that time; after unsuccessfully trying ppp, I also
tried to go that "option" (iirc) route (the one that supercedes ppp),
w/o success either.)

> Like wvdial. Run 'wvdialconf' -if- the modem is accessible. And then tweak
> /etc/wvdial.conf .

I didn't try wvdial. Hm, I'll have to surf around to figure out how to tweak it.

Christian.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
Archive: BANLkTi=_dg2zeda1+49Qm5LFqjW=OZPJ3Q@mail.gmail.com ">http://lists.debian.org/BANLkTi=_dg2zeda1+49Qm5LFqjW=OZPJ3Q@mail.gmail.com
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 03:01 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org