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Old 01-14-2010, 11:40 AM
randall
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

simple question here,

if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?
i've always used simple desktop towers but its getting a little crowded
nowadays.



this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.

Thanks,

Randall


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Old 01-14-2010, 12:24 PM
Michal
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

On 14/01/2010 12:40, randall wrote:
> simple question here,
>
> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?
> i've always used simple desktop towers but its getting a little crowded
> nowadays.
>
>
> this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Randall
>
>

Yes you can, and 1U's can work fine, depending on how deep your case is,
and how much stuff you want to shove in it. How do you mean "cramped"?
What are you putting in it?


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Old 01-14-2010, 05:13 PM
"Boyd Stephen Smith Jr."
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

On Thursday 14 January 2010 06:40:33 randall wrote:
> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?

Yes, the ATX is the MB form-factor. All ATX mobos fit into a rectangle with
specific dimensions. All ATX cases can hold at least a rectangle with
specific dimensions.[1]

> this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.

Yeah, you'll have to watch the height of any PCI cards you want to use, as
well as processor fans. A normal ATX tower case is generally as wide as a
3-4U ATX rackmount case is tall.[2]

[1] It's a bit more complex than that, but basically the "ATX" moniker on both
indicates they will fit.

[2] I usually estimate that a "U" is about 1.5 in. or 37.5 mm.
--
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Old 01-14-2010, 06:18 PM
Dan Ritter
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 01:40:33PM +0100, randall wrote:
> simple question here,
>
> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?
> i've always used simple desktop towers but its getting a little crowded
> nowadays.
>
>
> this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.

The biggest problem is likely to be height related -- check CPU
cooling, expansion cards, and so forth.

-dsr-

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Old 01-14-2010, 06:41 PM
Camaleón
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

On Thu, 14 Jan 2010 13:40:33 +0100, randall wrote:

> simple question here,

Not that simple ;-)

> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right? i've always used simple desktop
> towers but its getting a little crowded nowadays.

Yes, you can :-)

Just care about the requirements of the racked chasis matches the
specifications of the board components.

> this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.

If using 2U remember that you will probably need "low profiles" versions
of pci-e/pci-x cards and also for heatsinks/fans, slim DVD-RW devices and
you'll have little space for cabling...

Greetings,

--
Camaleón


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Old 01-14-2010, 09:09 PM
Stan Hoeppner
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

Boyd Stephen Smith Jr. put forth on 1/14/2010 12:13 PM:
> On Thursday 14 January 2010 06:40:33 randall wrote:
>> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
>> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?
>
> Yes, the ATX is the MB form-factor. All ATX mobos fit into a rectangle with
> specific dimensions. All ATX cases can hold at least a rectangle with
> specific dimensions.[1]

This is not entirely correct. MicroATX and ATX motherboards will fit in a
standard 19" ATX rackmount case as the core mounting hole pattern is shared by
both, but extended ATX motherboards (EATX) will not fit in most standard ATX
cases, whether rackmount or pedestal. There are only a handful of EATX mobos on
the market, and (almost?) all of them are quad socket server boards. The OP
probably doesn't have such a monster, so the answer to his question is probably
yes, it will fit.

>> this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.
>
> Yeah, you'll have to watch the height of any PCI cards you want to use, as
> well as processor fans. A normal ATX tower case is generally as wide as a
> 3-4U ATX rackmount case is tall.[2]

Virtually all 2U cases require "low profile" PCI cards and most require a PCI
riser card and mount the cards horizontally. Not all motherboard will work with
PCI risers, especially those with a mix of PCIe x16, PCIe x4, and standard PCI.
If your mobo has an AGP video card forget it, because AGP risers do not exist.

There may be a few 2U cases that have horizontal risers that allow full height
PCI cards but these would be few and far between. Some 3U cases will accept
full height PCI cards, while some are designed to strictly allow low profile PCI
cards directly or via risers. You have to go to a 4U or larger case to make
sure *all* PCI cards will fit without worry.

> [1] It's a bit more complex than that, but basically the "ATX" moniker on both
> indicates they will fit.

The devil is always in the details. Thoroughly research the components before
checkout.

> [2] I usually estimate that a "U" is about 1.5 in. or 37.5 mm.

Your estimation is wrong. One EIA/TIA Rack Unit, or "U", is exactly 1.75". It
was defined in standard EIA-310-D in 1992, has been with us for 18 years now.
There shouldn't have to be any guess work or "estimating" involved here.

--
Stan


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Old 01-14-2010, 09:14 PM
Stan Hoeppner
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

randall put forth on 1/14/2010 6:40 AM:
> simple question here,
>
> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?
> i've always used simple desktop towers but its getting a little crowded
> nowadays.
>
>
> this would a 2U case since i know it can get cramped in the height.

Randal, do you have a 19" rack into which you will be mounting this chassis, or
will it be sitting on you desk? If sitting on your desk, don't buy a rackmount
chassis, especially a 2U chassis. A 2U chassis is smaller in internal
dimensions than most mini towers, and you'll have problems installing expansion
cards. Forget PCIe, it won't work in generic barebones 2U rack cases due to the
riser card requirement.

Tell me what you want to do (your goals) and I'll tell you what hardware you
need to do it correctly. I am TheHardwareFreak.

--
Stan


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Old 01-14-2010, 09:42 PM
"Boyd Stephen Smith Jr."
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

On Thursday 14 January 2010 16:09:06 Stan Hoeppner wrote:
> Boyd Stephen Smith Jr. put forth on 1/14/2010 12:13 PM:
> > On Thursday 14 January 2010 06:40:33 randall wrote:
> >> if i buy a ATX 19" rack case with included power supply, i can simply
> >> put any ATX desktop mobo it it right?
> >
> > Yes, the ATX is the MB form-factor. All ATX mobos fit into a rectangle
> > with specific dimensions. All ATX cases can hold at least a rectangle
> > with specific dimensions.[1]
>
> This is not entirely correct. MicroATX and ATX motherboards will fit in a
> standard 19" ATX rackmount case as the core mounting hole pattern is shared
> by both, but extended ATX motherboards (EATX) will not fit in most
> standard ATX cases, whether rackmount or pedestal.

I consider MicroATX and EATX to be separate form factors from ATX.
--
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ICQ: 514984 YM/AIM: DaTwinkDaddy `-'(. .)`-'
http://iguanasuicide.net/ \_/
 
Old 01-14-2010, 09:57 PM
Joe
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

Stan Hoeppner wrote:

Boyd Stephen Smith Jr. put forth on 1/14/2010 12:13 PM:





[2] I usually estimate that a "U" is about 1.5 in. or 37.5 mm.


Your estimation is wrong. One EIA/TIA Rack Unit, or "U", is exactly 1.75". It
was defined in standard EIA-310-D in 1992, has been with us for 18 years now.
There shouldn't have to be any guess work or "estimating" involved here.



That's probably one of the more recent standards, but the 19 inch rack
has been around for close to a century, having started life in the
telephone business. More than thirty years ago, I was working on
1946-designed 19 inch rack gear.


--
Joe


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Old 01-15-2010, 12:41 AM
Stan Hoeppner
 
Default desktop mobo in a 19 inch

Joe put forth on 1/14/2010 4:57 PM:
> Stan Hoeppner wrote:
>> Boyd Stephen Smith Jr. put forth on 1/14/2010 12:13 PM:
>
>>
>>> [2] I usually estimate that a "U" is about 1.5 in. or 37.5 mm.
>>
>> Your estimation is wrong. One EIA/TIA Rack Unit, or "U", is exactly
>> 1.75". It
>> was defined in standard EIA-310-D in 1992, has been with us for 18
>> years now.
>> There shouldn't have to be any guess work or "estimating" involved
>> here.
>>
>
> That's probably one of the more recent standards, but the 19 inch rack
> has been around for close to a century, having started life in the
> telephone business. More than thirty years ago, I was working on
> 1946-designed 19 inch rack gear.

19" width racks do predate EIA-310-D by many years. This standard merely
formalized the 19" width for electronic and telecommunications use. The key
standard that was established in 1992 though was a equipment "height" and
mounting hole placement, so that one could assemble a rack full of gear from
different manufacturers without having gaps between equipment, or running into
"overlap" issues when installing two dissimilar pieces of gear one atop the other.

Historically, telecom frames have been 24" not 19", and they are called "frames"
in the telco industry, not "racks". 19" racks didn't start appearing in telco
central offices until the mid-late 1990s with the explosion of the internet and
telcos becoming defacto ISPs in many markets, especially after the advent of DSL.

One could/can track this trend merely by watching the available "rack" form
factors of SUNs Netra and standard data center servers. In the early days SUN
offered 24" wide form factor Netra servers. Now it's all 19" because such racks
now proliferate in Telco COs, whereas beyond 15 years ago it was all 24". SUN
no longer offers 24" frame rackmount servers, although their StarFire series
(e10K-e25K) used a 24" wide custom full height cabinet. Their current flagship
Sparc server comes in a 33.5" wide cabinet.

--
Stan



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