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Old 12-31-2009, 03:27 PM
Steve Kleene
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

In a recent thread ("can't get CUPS working with Xerox Phaser 6280DN"), the
question arose whether I should connect to the Phaser via USB or network.
USB has two clear disadvantages:

1. It is slower.
2. Talking to the Phaser on USB from my VMware XP client crashes the
client.

I now have all of this working on a Netgear hub, and (as expected) there's
one thing I don't like about it. I can no longer access the PC from anywhere
outside the local hub. Within my company, my Ethernet connection has an IP
10.97.8.XXX. Before today, any machine connecting to that IP got the PC and
nothing else. Now the PC is 192.168.0.2 within the local network and is
unavailable to other PCs on the 10.X.X.X company network.

One solution would be to get a second IP and jack, but my company charges
more than I want to pay. A second would be to use a separate NIC for the
Phaser. However, people at the VMware forum say it's tricky to pull this
off. In theory I might also be able to put a VPN server on the PC, but I
hope to avoid having to use VPN for every connection.

I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to make my now very local machine
accessible from the company network.

Thanks.


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Old 12-31-2009, 03:47 PM
Bob McGowan
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

Steve Kleene wrote:
> In a recent thread ("can't get CUPS working with Xerox Phaser 6280DN"), the
> question arose whether I should connect to the Phaser via USB or network.
> USB has two clear disadvantages:
>
> 1. It is slower.
> 2. Talking to the Phaser on USB from my VMware XP client crashes the
> client.
>
> I now have all of this working on a Netgear hub, and (as expected) there's
> one thing I don't like about it. I can no longer access the PC from anywhere
> outside the local hub. Within my company, my Ethernet connection has an IP
> 10.97.8.XXX. Before today, any machine connecting to that IP got the PC and
> nothing else. Now the PC is 192.168.0.2 within the local network and is
> unavailable to other PCs on the 10.X.X.X company network.
>
> One solution would be to get a second IP and jack, but my company charges
> more than I want to pay. A second would be to use a separate NIC for the
> Phaser. However, people at the VMware forum say it's tricky to pull this
> off. In theory I might also be able to put a VPN server on the PC, but I
> hope to avoid having to use VPN for every connection.
>
> I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to make my now very local machine
> accessible from the company network.
>
> Thanks.
>
>

First, let me say I have not been following this thread, so I'm not
really clear on exactly how the setup would now look.

That said, I do have a small, office sized 'local' network with both
physical and virtual machines. I use Shorewall to configure a firewall
rules set that does NAT translation of the 10.x.x.x address to my
internal 169.x.x.x address.

This works quite well for me, but I don't know if it's applicable to
your situation, so YMMV

--
Bob McGowan


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Old 12-31-2009, 04:22 PM
Camaleón
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 11:27:32 -0500, Steve Kleene wrote:

> In a recent thread ("can't get CUPS working with Xerox Phaser 6280DN"),
> the question arose whether I should connect to the Phaser via USB or
> network. USB has two clear disadvantages:
>
> 1. It is slower.
> 2. Talking to the Phaser on USB from my VMware XP client crashes the
> client.

I will not have any doubt about it: I'd follow the network path. I find
USB bus to be more unreliable than ethernet.

> I now have all of this working on a Netgear hub, and (as expected)
> there's one thing I don't like about it. I can no longer access the PC
> from anywhere outside the local hub. Within my company, my Ethernet
> connection has an IP 10.97.8.XXX. Before today, any machine connecting
> to that IP got the PC and nothing else. Now the PC is 192.168.0.2
> within the local network and is unavailable to other PCs on the 10.X.X.X
> company network.

Can't you change that? I mean, if your printer has an embedded newtork
adpater and your computer have a network card, just change both IP
addresses at your convenience.

Or is there something that impedes you for doing this (company policy,
etc...)?

> One solution would be to get a second IP and jack, but my company
> charges more than I want to pay. A second would be to use a separate
> NIC for the Phaser. However, people at the VMware forum say it's tricky
> to pull this off. In theory I might also be able to put a VPN server on
> the PC, but I hope to avoid having to use VPN for every connection.
>
> I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to make my now very local machine
> accessible from the company network.

I think I don't fully understand your network environment and
restrictions. Never heard before that one has to pay for getting a local/
internal IP address :-?

Can you please expand that a bit?

Greetings,

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Camaleón


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Old 12-31-2009, 04:43 PM
Eduardo M KALINOWSKI
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

Steve Kleene wrote:
> In a recent thread ("can't get CUPS working with Xerox Phaser 6280DN"), the
> question arose whether I should connect to the Phaser via USB or network.
> USB has two clear disadvantages:
>
> 1. It is slower.
> 2. Talking to the Phaser on USB from my VMware XP client crashes the
> client.
>
> I now have all of this working on a Netgear hub, and (as expected) there's
> one thing I don't like about it. I can no longer access the PC from anywhere
> outside the local hub. Within my company, my Ethernet connection has an IP
> 10.97.8.XXX. Before today, any machine connecting to that IP got the PC and
> nothing else. Now the PC is 192.168.0.2 within the local network and is
> unavailable to other PCs on the 10.X.X.X company network.
>
> One solution would be to get a second IP and jack, but my company charges
> more than I want to pay. A second would be to use a separate NIC for the
> Phaser. However, people at the VMware forum say it's tricky to pull this
> off. In theory I might also be able to put a VPN server on the PC, but I
> hope to avoid having to use VPN for every connection.
>
> I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to make my now very local machine
> accessible from the company network.
>
Your "hub" is not really a hub, but rather a router doing NAT.

It will help us suggest something if you explain a little better your
setup: what is "your company"? The place you work, or your ISP?

--
Fraud is the homage that force pays to reason.
-- Charles Curtis, "A Commonplace Book"

Eduardo M KALINOWSKI
eduardo@kalinowski.com.br


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Old 12-31-2009, 05:00 PM
Steve Kleene
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 11:27:32 -0500, I wrote:

> ... I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to make my now very local machine
> accessible from the company network.

Bob McGowan <bob_mcgowan@symantec.com> replied:

> I use Shorewall to configure a firewall rules set that does NAT translation
> of the 10.x.x.x address to my internal 169.x.x.x address.

I hadn't know that was a possibility. On checking, though, it quickly became
clear that my router has just such an option. It was easy to set up, and I
now have access via ssh from my other machines. Thanks.

On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 17:22:41 +0000 (UTC), <noelamac@gmail.com replied:

> I think I don't fully understand your network environment and
> restrictions. Never heard before that one has to pay for getting a local/
> internal IP address :-?
>
> Can you please expand that a bit?

and on Thu, 31 Dec 2009 15:43:12 -0200, Eduardo M KALINOWSKI wrote:

> It will help us suggest something if you explain a little better your
> setup: what is "your company"? The place you work, or your ISP?

My company is the University of Cincinnati. They provide Ethernet jacks,
each with an IP address within their network. Network operations charges a
substantial monthly fee for each connection within their network.

Thanks to all who replied.


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Old 12-31-2009, 05:36 PM
Eduardo M KALINOWSKI
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

Steve Kleene wrote:
> and on Thu, 31 Dec 2009 15:43:12 -0200, Eduardo M KALINOWSKI wrote
>> It will help us suggest something if you explain a little better your
>> setup: what is "your company"? The place you work, or your ISP?
>>
>
> My company is the University of Cincinnati. They provide Ethernet jacks,
> each with an IP address within their network. Network operations charges a
> substantial monthly fee for each connection within their network.
>
>

I had never heard of that policy, but I'll work based on this.

Well, there is no way to avoid having to use another private IP range
for you machine and your printer. A simple switch would allow you to
connect both the computer and the printer to the same network (getting
both addresses in the 10.97.8.XXX range), but you'd probably have to pay
for the extra IP, even if there is no need for extra wiring and jacks
(there's no reason to charge that - private IPs are free, but...)

So you really need NAT. What you can do is configure you NAT to forward
incoming requests to your computer. How to do that varies from model to
model, but you'll need to access its page (something like
http://192.168.0.1) and find the option. This way other computers will
see you.

Or you could simply connect the printer via USB. In this case (and if
you're the only one using it), I'd be inclined to use that option.


--
He who has a shady past knows that nice guys finish last.

Eduardo M KALINOWSKI
eduardo@kalinowski.com.br


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Old 12-31-2009, 05:57 PM
Steve Kleene
 
Default new printer: USB or network?

On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 16:36:32 -0200, Eduardo M KALINOWSKI wrote:

> So you really need NAT. What you can do is configure you NAT to forward
> incoming requests to your computer. ...
> Or you could simply connect the printer via USB. In this case (and if
> you're the only one using it), I'd be inclined to use that option.

I now have an incoming rule on the Netgear router that allows my remote PC to
connect to the PC on the local network via ssh. It's working fine.

I did try USB first. Its big disadvantage is that my virtual XP machine
(VMware Server 1) gives the blue screen of death when it tries to print to
the Phaser via USB. I had the same experience with a USB scanner with both
Server 1 and 2. Server 1 works with an old USB inkjet and with USB flash
drives.

Regardless of the connection, there also seems to be a problem with Xerox's
linux driver for the Phaser 6280DN. Someone else is helping me with that,
and if that gets resolved I'll post it to the original thread.

Thanks.


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