FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Debian > Debian User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 12-08-2009, 02:51 PM
Tom H
 
Default How to move an OS install from one primary partition to another?

>> IMHO, your biggest problem won't be with copying/ghosting/dd-ing your
>> Windows partition: your biggest (in fact, unsurmountable) problem will be
>> all your C:Windows and Cocuments and Settings and C:Program Files (and
>> similar) references, hard-coded into your Windows Registry. IIRC from my
>> (over forever, thankfully!) Windows days, there was no *easy* way to make a
>> Registry, built on a C: drive to work reliably on a D:, E: and so on. I
>> think your best bet is to use the swap (hd0,hd1) command in Grub (the syntax
>> is wrong, since I'm quoting from memory, but you surely know what I mean).

>> If beside the drive letters (partition locations) their respective sizes
>> are also a problem, just resize them with GParted, it's an *incredibly*
>> mature piece of software.

> To come up to date a little, Windows can now re-letter drives persistently.
> Of course, you do need to boot into it to change the default... but even in
> the old days, Windows wouldn't label a drive at all unless it recognised the
> filesystem, so you could have one or two Linux partitions ahead of a Windows
> one which would still get labelled C:. You could also get away with some
> out-of-order partition numbering, at least with the NT series. The only
> official way of getting NT4 onto a large drive involved two separate
> installations of it and some decidedly dodgy partition ordering, placing a
> primary after the extended partition. What you really had to avoid with a
> multi-partition Windows installation was adding a second drive containing
> one or more primary partitions, the first of which would be auto-lettered
> D:, which would totally screw up Windows.

> The Vista bootloader bears no resemblance at all to the NT-to-XP version.
> There's no boot.ini and in fact no text configuration file. Configuration
> must be done with a Microsoft utility. On the plus side, the bootloader is
> much more powerful, and among other things can schedule a number of boots to
> different OSes. This is useful *to remotely dual/multi-boot without getting
> stuck in one OS.

With Vista and 7 (boot.ini was dropped with the move to Vista), you
can edit boot parameters (and boot from non-C disks) with bcdedit.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2009, 07:25 PM
Emanoil Kotsev
 
Default How to move an OS install from one primary partition to another?

Dotan Cohen wrote:

>> That in itself shouldn't be a problem. You could just copy the files
>> (using ntfs-3g), use dd or some other method. But your problem will be
>> that Windows won't find itself in the expected place anymore. Off the
>> top of my head, I only know of C:oot.ini which must be adapted, but I
>> don't even know whether Windows 7 still uses this file.
>>
>
> I wanted to avoid the hands-dirty approach as I am unfamiliar with
> Windows.
>
>
>> Google shoud help, though:
>> http://www.google.com/search?q=move+windows+7+another+partition
>>
>> Feel free to share the approach that worked for you.
>>
>
> They all recommend some expensive proprietary application or another.
> I thought that maybe there would be a more Debian way . I have found
> Clonezilla, a Norton Ghost alternative, so I will try it. Thanks!
>

Just copy over and run the windows installation disk. Choose repair
procedure (autorepair) and it will fix all the stuff. No ghost no
nothing :-). I've done it to a vfat with win2000 and winXP. The Autorepair
process replaces the windows core and sets up the paths.

regards


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2009, 07:56 PM
Mark
 
Default How to move an OS install from one primary partition to another?

On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 12:25 PM, Emanoil Kotsev <deloptes@yahoo.com> wrote:
Dotan Cohen wrote:



>> That in itself shouldn't be a problem. You could just copy the files

>> (using ntfs-3g), use dd or some other method. But your problem will be

>> that Windows won't find itself in the expected place anymore. Off the

>> top of my head, I only know of C:oot.ini which must be adapted, but I

>> don't even know whether Windows 7 still uses this file.

I've forgotten what the OP's question was, but when it comes to Ghosting/imaging Windows OS's to another drive or partition, I've used this (free for private edition/use) software numerous times with great results (I've always pulled the hdd's physically and connected via USB to ensure no running processes interfered): http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm.


HTH.

Mark
 
Old 01-18-2010, 11:49 AM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default How to move an OS install from one primary partition to another?

> If beside the drive letters (partition locations) their respective
> sizes are also a problem, just resize them with GParted, it's an
> *incredibly* mature piece of software.
>

Sorry for the late reply. Yes, the problem was that Windows was
installed in a partiton of the wrong size, not leaving room on the
right partition for the real OS. I wound up just formatting and
reinstalling, rather than making the machine's owner all queasy with
"might work".

Thanks!


--
Dotan Cohen

http://what-is-what.com
http://gibberish.co.il


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 04:33 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org