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-   -   A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice) (http://www.linux-archive.org/debian-user/240648-question-about-etc-profile-scim-does-not-work-openoffice.html)

Rodolfo Medina 02-05-2009 03:18 PM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:

> I added the following lines to /etc/profile:
>
> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim


How can I get the same result *without* putting that stuff in /etc/profile? I
mean, if I put that in /etc/profile, those commands are run at every boot,
wheraes I want to run them at my pleasure. If I simply give them from command
line:

# export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
# export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
# export QT_IM_MODULE=scim

they don't seem to take any effect.

Thanks for any help
Rodolfo


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Rodolfo Medina 02-05-2009 05:37 PM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:

>>> I added the following lines to /etc/profile:
>>>
>>> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>>> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>>> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim


Rodolfo Medina wrote:

>> How can I get the same result *without* putting that stuff in /etc/profile?
>> I mean, if I put that in /etc/profile, those commands are run at every boot,
>> wheraes I want to run them at my pleasure. If I simply give them from
>> command line:
>>
>> # export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>> # export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>> # export QT_IM_MODULE=scim
>>
>> they don't seem to take any effect.


Aneurin Price <aneurin.price@gmail.com> writes:


> What is it you're actually trying to do? Those environment variables should
> be set for the shell you typed that into, and any child processes. They won't
> be set globally because, as far as I know, there's no way to set the
> environment for a parent process. This means that if you're opening up an
> xterm or whatever and entering those variables then they will take effect for
> anything started from that xterm, but not for anything else. To have them set
> across the board you would need them set earlier - like in /etc/profile as
> you've discovered, or your user's config files.


All right, that answers my question, thanks. Now, I put those lines in a
script:

#!/bin/bash
export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
export QT_IM_MODULE=scim

, made it executable with `chmod 755' but it doesn't seem to work. Why?

Thanks again
Rodolfo


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Lisi Reisz 02-05-2009 05:46 PM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
On Thursday 05 February 2009 19:35:36 Rodolfo Medina wrote:
> Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:
> >>>>> I added the following lines to /etc/profile:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
> >>>>> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
> >>>>> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim

> $ source script
>
> has the same effect than running those three commands from command line.
> Instead, putting them in /etc/profile is more powerful, it gets more
> effects. It seems there's no alternative to that?

The place I got that from said that you could put them in a user's own profile
file if you wanted them to be for one user only. I haven't tested that, and
I can't remember the details.

I'm not clear why you object to putting it in /etc/profiles? I shan't be
using it myself very often - but I just wanted it to work, and by the
simplest (for me) method.

Lisi


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Rodolfo Medina 02-05-2009 06:35 PM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:

>>>>> I added the following lines to /etc/profile:
>>>>>
>>>>> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>>>>> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>>>>> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim

Rodolfo Medina wrote:

>>>> How can I get the same result *without* putting that stuff in
>>>> /etc/profile? I mean, if I put that in /etc/profile, those commands are
>>>> run at every boot, wheraes I want to run them at my pleasure. If I simply
>>>> give them from command line:
>>>>
>>>> # export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>>>> # export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>>>> # export QT_IM_MODULE=scim
>>>>
>>>> they don't seem to take any effect.



Aneurin Price <aneurin.price@gmail.com> writes:

>>> What is it you're actually trying to do? Those environment variables should
>>> be set for the shell you typed that into, and any child processes. They
>>> won't be set globally because, as far as I know, there's no way to set the
>>> environment for a parent process. This means that if you're opening up an
>>> xterm or whatever and entering those variables then they will take effect
>>> for anything started from that xterm, but not for anything else. To have
>>> them set across the board you would need them set earlier - like in
>>> /etc/profile as you've discovered, or your user's config files.



Rodolfo Medina <rodolfo.medina@gmail.com> wrote:

>> All right, that answers my question, thanks. Now, I put those lines in a
>> script:
>>
>> #!/bin/bash
>> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim
>>
>> , made it executable with `chmod 755' but it doesn't seem to work. Why?



Aneurin Price <aneurin.price@gmail.com> writes:

> Let's say you've saved this as 'script', and you're running '$./script' or
> '$bash script'. What that will do is spawn a new bash process which
> interprets the script, and then exits. If you want the variables to be set in
> the shell you started from, rather than starting a new bash process, you
> shouldn't run the script but instead 'source' it, like '$source script'. This
> tells the existing shell to interpret the commands in the script, rather than
> creating a new shell to do it.


$ source script

has the same effect than running those three commands from command line.
Instead, putting them in /etc/profile is more powerful, it gets more effects.
It seems there's no alternative to that?

Rodolfo


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Rodolfo Medina 02-05-2009 07:19 PM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:

>> >>>>> I added the following lines to /etc/profile:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>> >>>>> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>> >>>>> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim



Rodolfo Medina wrote:

>> $ source script
>>
>> has the same effect than running those three commands from command line.
>> Instead, putting them in /etc/profile is more powerful, it gets more
>> effects. It seems there's no alternative to that?



Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:

> The place I got that from said that you could put them in a user's own
> profile file if you wanted them to be for one user only. I haven't tested
> that, and I can't remember the details.
>
> I'm not clear why you object to putting it in /etc/profiles? I shan't be
> using it myself very often - but I just wanted it to work, and by the
> simplest (for me) method.



Aneurin Price <aneurin.price@gmail.com> writes:

> I'm not sure what you mean by 'more effects'. You can get the effect of
> /etc/profile on a per user basis by adding commands to ~/.bash_profile (for
> bash shells), ~/.profile (for most shells), ~/.xsession for X sessions - I
> *think* this should be read by xdm/kdm/gdm and therefore work with any
> desktop environment, but I'm not exactly sure how it's handled. The one
> thing you can't do (so far as I know) is set variables for your whole session
> *after* logging in.



We're talking about details, now the problem of scim working with oowriter
seems to be solved.

Anyway: putting those `export' commands in /etc/profile has the advantage that
I can put chinese characters also in the command line, with `C-space'. The
disadvantage is that scim is automatically started every time I start the
Terminal application, even if I don't want to use scim. The Terminal is slowed
down when starting.

On the other hand, running those three commands from command line has the
advantage that I start scim only when necessary; but then it seems that I lose
the possibility of using scim to input characters in the shell.

I don't know if it's clear...

Bye
Rodolfo


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Lisi Reisz 02-05-2009 10:19 PM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
On Thursday 05 February 2009 20:19:45 Rodolfo Medina wrote:
> The Terminal is slowed
> down when starting.

Konsole on my system isn't slowed down at all. It opens virtually
instantaneously. Just goes to show that our systems are as individual as we
are.....

Lisi


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Deng Xiyue 02-06-2009 02:46 AM

A question about /etc/profile (was: Scim does not work with openoffice)
 
Rodolfo Medina <rodolfo.medina@gmail.com> writes:

> Lisi Reisz <lisi.reisz@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> I added the following lines to /etc/profile:
>>
>> export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
>> export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
>> export QT_IM_MODULE=scim
>
>
> How can I get the same result *without* putting that stuff in
> /etc/profile? I mean, if I put that in /etc/profile, those commands
> are run at every boot, wheraes I want to run them at my pleasure. If
> I simply give them from command line:
>
> # export XMODIFIERS=@im=SCIM
> # export GTK_IM_MODULE=scim
> # export QT_IM_MODULE=scim
>
> they don't seem to take any effect.
>
> Thanks for any help
> Rodolfo

It's always better to use im-switch, with which you can set the
configuration file shipped with scim to be loaded on X startup:

# apt-get install im-switch

By default, /etc/X11/xinit/xinput.d/scim has the highest priority, which
sets {GTK,QT}_IM_MODULE to xim. You can manually change that by:

$ im-switch -s scim-immodule

Where scim-immodule provides what you want. Note you can run the
command above as your default user, which will create a symlink in your
~/.xinput.d that has the same effect.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Deng Xiyue


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