FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Debian > Debian User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 01-04-2009, 08:11 PM
Stefan Schmidt
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

Hello,

in my understanding the /etc/hosts file should contain an entry with the
FQDN of the host.


123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname

I would for simplicity prefer to use a domain name instead of a FQDN.

123.123.123.123 domain.tld hostname

In my DNS-configuration I can define an IP- address for both the domain
name and the subdomain.


domain.tld -> 123.123.123.123
subdomain.domain.tld -> 123.123.123.123

So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a
FQDN? Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?


Cheers, Stefan


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-04-2009, 08:12 PM
Stefan Schmidt
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

Hello,

in my understanding the /etc/hosts file should contain an entry with the
FQDN of the host.

123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname

I would for simplicity prefer to use a domain name instead of a FQDN.

123.123.123.123 domain.tld hostname

In my DNS-configuration I can define an IP- address for both the domain
name and the subdomain.

domain.tld -> 123.123.123.123
subdomain.domain.tld -> 123.123.123.123

So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a
FQDN? Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?

Cheers, Stefan


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-04-2009, 09:35 PM
Richard A Nelson
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

On Sun, 4 Jan 2009, Stefan Schmidt wrote:


Hello,


Howdy

in my understanding the /etc/hosts file should contain an entry with the FQDN
of the host.


123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname


Yes, that is the proper format and order


I would for simplicity prefer to use a domain name instead of a FQDN.

123.123.123.123 domain.tld hostname


Don't do that, it'll bite you - eventually

In my DNS-configuration I can define an IP- address for both the domain name
and the subdomain.


domain.tld -> 123.123.123.123
subdomain.domain.tld -> 123.123.123.123


Yes you can, and this may, or may not come back to bite you

So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a FQDN?
Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?


What happens when you want/need to add another machine ?

Many network daemons/tools will query the available interfaces and
collect ip addrs/names... Allowing a hostname to also be the domain
name can cause problems.

--
Rick Nelson
* Knghtbrd assigns 3 to Chris
* variable wonders who else is named chris besides me
<Knghtbrd> variable - you. =>
* Knghtbrd waits for variable to dramatically say "I feel SO used!"
<variable> Knghtbrd:
* variable ++
<variable>


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-04-2009, 10:09 PM
Stefan Schmidt
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

Thanks for your feedback!


So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a
FQDN? Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?


What happens when you want/need to add another machine ?
I use the domain solely for private purposes and I will probably never
need more than two or three servers. In fact I currently administer two
servers which one domain name for each server. Of course if I were a
company and I had 500 servers I would probably use subdomains instead of
registering a domain for each server.

Allowing a hostname to also be the domain name can cause problems.
I have searched extensively for disadvantages of using a domain name
instead of a FQDN but could not find anything. What kind of concrete
problems can occur?


Cheers, Stefan


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-05-2009, 01:05 PM
Chris Davies
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

Stefan Schmidt <stefan.schmidt@gmx.net> wrote:
> in my understanding the /etc/hosts file should contain an entry with the
> FQDN of the host.

> 123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname

Yes, that's right.


> I would for simplicity prefer to use a domain name instead of a FQDN.
> 123.123.123.123 domain.tld hostname

Fine.


> So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a
> FQDN? Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?

Typically, I see it that a domain refers to an entity, whereas a FQDN refers to a host or service within that entity. For your purposes the following sdhould be sufficient:

127.0.0.1 localhost
123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname domain.tld

When resolving from name to IP, the first match will succeed. When
resolving from IP to name, the leftmost entry on the first line will be
considered the canonical name (hostname.domain.tld in this case).

Chris


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-06-2009, 09:20 AM
"James Youngman"
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

On Sun, Jan 4, 2009 at 9:11 PM, Stefan Schmidt <stefan.schmidt@gmx.de> wrote:
> Hello,
>
> in my understanding the /etc/hosts file should contain an entry with the
> FQDN of the host.
>
> 123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname
>
> I would for simplicity prefer to use a domain name instead of a FQDN.
>
> 123.123.123.123 domain.tld hostname

That will work well enough. Lots of organisations do this with their
DNS records:...

~$ host -t A microsoft.com
microsoft.com has address 207.46.197.32
microsoft.com has address 207.46.232.182

... despite the fact that the name is also a domain name ...

~$ host -t SOA microsoft.com
microsoft.com has SOA record ns1.msft.net. msnhst.microsoft.com.
2009010502 300 600 2419200 3600

... and that's on the public part of the Internet. You should feel
still less constrained about what happens inside your internal network
(up until the point you need to join it to somebody else's).

James.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-10-2009, 07:35 PM
mouss
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

Chris Davies a écrit :
> Stefan Schmidt <stefan.schmidt@gmx.net> wrote:
>> in my understanding the /etc/hosts file should contain an entry with the
>> FQDN of the host.
>
>> 123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname
>
> Yes, that's right.
>
>
>> I would for simplicity prefer to use a domain name instead of a FQDN.
>> 123.123.123.123 domain.tld hostname
>
> Fine.
>
>
>> So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a
>> FQDN? Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?
>
> Typically, I see it that a domain refers to an entity, whereas a FQDN refers to a host or service within that entity. For your purposes the following sdhould be sufficient:
>

domain.tld is a FQDN if "tld" is a valid tld. a domain is fqdn if it
contains all labels until the top domain. same as for an absolute path
(aka /tld/domain). in dns terms, fqdn ends with a dot though.

now, I don't see why Stefan wants to do that...

> 127.0.0.1 localhost
> 123.123.123.123 hostname.domain.tld hostname domain.tld
>
> When resolving from name to IP, the first match will succeed. When
> resolving from IP to name, the leftmost entry on the first line will be
> considered the canonical name (hostname.domain.tld in this case).
>



--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 01-29-2009, 11:59 PM
Stefan Schmidt
 
Default FQDN vs. domain in /etc/hosts

So both addresses are unambiguous. For what reason now would I need a
FQDN? Why wouldn't a domain name suffice?


Typically, I see it that a domain refers to an entity, whereas a FQDN refers to a host or service within that entity. For your purposes the following sdhould be sufficient:




domain.tld is a FQDN if "tld" is a valid tld. a domain is fqdn if it
contains all labels until the top domain. same as for an absolute path
(aka /tld/domain). in dns terms, fqdn ends with a dot though.

now, I don't see why Stefan wants to do that...




...because Stefan is a lazy boy and therefore prefers short names
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 12:48 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org