FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Debian > Debian User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 12-05-2008, 03:58 PM
Adrian Chapela
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Hello,

I am thinking on a new server for my mision critical database server.
This server will have Debian OS and MySQL database server. Requisites: 2
CPU (minimun), 32 GB RAM, 2 TB for mysql data files on SAS Hard Disks,
500 GB for mysql binlog + system on SAS Hard Disks, RAID with two
channels (1 for data files and 1 for binlog).


I am thinking in HP , one HP Proliant ML370 but it hasn't 300 GB SAS on
2,5".


Then I have two options, SuperMicro has 16 3,5" hot plug bays and
Silicon Mechanics also with 16 3,5". Do you know something about it ?
Could you advice me another companies ?


Thank you!


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-08-2008, 12:18 PM
kj
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Adrian Chapela wrote:
I am thinking on a new server for my mision critical database server.
This server will have Debian OS and MySQL database server. Requisites:
2 CPU (minimun), 32 GB RAM, 2 TB for mysql data files on SAS Hard
Disks, 500 GB for mysql binlog + system on SAS Hard Disks, RAID with
two channels (1 for data files and 1 for binlog).


I am thinking in HP , one HP Proliant ML370 but it hasn't 300 GB SAS
on 2,5".



I can't give you advice on specific hardware, but I'd tell you this:

1. All other things being equal, get the one with the fastest possible
disc setup.

2. Make sure you put 64bit Debian on it.
3. Make double sure you put 64bit Debian on it

--kj


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-08-2008, 08:02 PM
Anoop Aryal
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

On Mon, 2008-12-08 at 13:18 +0000, kj wrote:
> Adrian Chapela wrote:
> > I am thinking on a new server for my mision critical database server.
> > This server will have Debian OS and MySQL database server. Requisites:
> > 2 CPU (minimun), 32 GB RAM, 2 TB for mysql data files on SAS Hard
> > Disks, 500 GB for mysql binlog + system on SAS Hard Disks, RAID with
> > two channels (1 for data files and 1 for binlog).
> >
> > I am thinking in HP , one HP Proliant ML370 but it hasn't 300 GB SAS
> > on 2,5".
>
>
> I can't give you advice on specific hardware, but I'd tell you this:
>
> 1. All other things being equal, get the one with the fastest possible
> disc setup.
> 2. Make sure you put 64bit Debian on it.
> 3. Make double sure you put 64bit Debian on it
>

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

We were looking at 64bit for running some of our Java stuff on since the
JVM on 32bit can only address so much memory. 64bit was actually slower,
at least for Java despite the JVM being able to allocate more memory
before being forced to GC.

How does something like MySQL behave on a 64bit vs a 32bit platform?


> --kj
>
>

- Anoop


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2008, 08:10 AM
Adrian Chapela
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Anoop Aryal escribió:

On Mon, 2008-12-08 at 13:18 +0000, kj wrote:


Adrian Chapela wrote:

I am thinking on a new server for my mision critical database server.
This server will have Debian OS and MySQL database server. Requisites:
2 CPU (minimun), 32 GB RAM, 2 TB for mysql data files on SAS Hard
Disks, 500 GB for mysql binlog + system on SAS Hard Disks, RAID with
two channels (1 for data files and 1 for binlog).


I am thinking in HP , one HP Proliant ML370 but it hasn't 300 GB SAS
on 2,5".


I can't give you advice on specific hardware, but I'd tell you this:

1. All other things being equal, get the one with the fastest possible
disc setup.

2. Make sure you put 64bit Debian on it.
3. Make double sure you put 64bit Debian on it


Thank you for the advice, I know the power of 64bit. When I change my
32bit installation with a 64bit installation, I double the performance
of my system (I needed to wait for a 64bit debian stable version). I am
very happy with 64bit.


I think the same about your recommendation and I have configured a HP
Proliant ML370 G5 with two drive cage for 8 SAS drives and two
controllers. With this I will have two separate channels, one for the
data files and another for the binlog and system (system is doing little
writes on a server). The main problem is the size of drives. This server
needs 2.5 SAS drives and only from yesterday there are available SAS 300
GB 2.5 drives 10k. I am not sure if it will be enough, I will have 8
drives on the data files array, stripping on 7 disks will be enough ? I
think it will be fast but I am not sure if it will be enough.


Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

You will see the difference when you will have software prepared for
64bit. MySQL has a 32bit version and 64bit version.

We were looking at 64bit for running some of our Java stuff on since the
JVM on 32bit can only address so much memory. 64bit was actually slower,
at least for Java despite the JVM being able to allocate more memory
before being forced to GC.

How does something like MySQL behave on a 64bit vs a 32bit platform?

The problem of 32bits MySQL is 2 GB memory limit. With 64bits you
doesn't have this limitation and you could improve your mysql
performance. But MySQL is prepared for that. MySQL 32bits and 64bits has
the same behaviour for a client. The difference is on performance only.


If you know that JVM is slower in 64 bits, it is a JVM problem not a
platform problem ( I think after reading you).


Regards.




--kj





- Anoop







--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2008, 08:49 AM
kj
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Anoop Aryal wrote:

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

It will make all the difference on a box with 16GB. On a 32bit machine,
you can use a PAE enabled kernel to allow the operating system to
address all the memory, but you're still stuck with a 4GB per-process
limit, which means if this will be a dedicated MySQL server, you're
wasting 12GB of memory.



We were looking at 64bit for running some of our Java stuff on since the
JVM on 32bit can only address so much memory. 64bit was actually slower,
at least for Java despite the JVM being able to allocate more memory
before being forced to GC.

I am not a programmer, so my understanding of why this happens is basic
at best. But I belive this has to do with the increased overhead of
64bit. From what I've seen/read, 64bit applications will often use a
little bit more memory.



How does something like MySQL behave on a 64bit vs a 32bit platform?


Fantastic.


--kj


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2008, 09:02 AM
Adrian Chapela
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

kj escribió:

Anoop Aryal wrote:

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

It will make all the difference on a box with 16GB. On a 32bit
machine, you can use a PAE enabled kernel to allow the operating
system to address all the memory, but you're still stuck with a 4GB
per-process limit, which means if this will be a dedicated MySQL
server, you're wasting 12GB of memory.
No, you are wasting 14 GB. The 2 GB limitation is a limitation of MySQL
server. PAE is good but it has a lower performance than a 64 bit
platform. PAE is a workaround if you can't have a 64 bit machine if your
application is only 32 bits and need too much memory.




We were looking at 64bit for running some of our Java stuff on since the
JVM on 32bit can only address so much memory. 64bit was actually slower,
at least for Java despite the JVM being able to allocate more memory
before being forced to GC.

I am not a programmer, so my understanding of why this happens is
basic at best. But I belive this has to do with the increased
overhead of 64bit. From what I've seen/read, 64bit applications will
often use a little bit more memory.



How does something like MySQL behave on a 64bit vs a 32bit platform?


Fantastic.


--kj





--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2008, 09:06 AM
kj
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Adrian Chapela wrote:

kj escribió:

Anoop Aryal wrote:

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

It will make all the difference on a box with 16GB. On a 32bit
machine, you can use a PAE enabled kernel to allow the operating
system to address all the memory, but you're still stuck with a 4GB
per-process limit, which means if this will be a dedicated MySQL
server, you're wasting 12GB of memory.
No, you are wasting 14 GB. The 2 GB limitation is a limitation of
MySQL server.

You're right.

PAE is good but it has a lower performance than a 64 bit platform. PAE
is a workaround if you can't have a 64 bit machine if your application
is only 32 bits and need too much memory.
PAE is useful but it still won't allow any single process to access more
than 4GB of memory. So no use in this case.


--kj


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-09-2008, 12:23 PM
Ron Johnson
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

On 12/09/08 03:49, kj wrote:

Anoop Aryal wrote:

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

It will make all the difference on a box with 16GB. On a 32bit machine,
you can use a PAE enabled kernel to allow the operating system to
address all the memory, but you're still stuck with a 4GB per-process
limit, which means if this will be a dedicated MySQL server, you're
wasting 12GB of memory.


Why wouldn't Linux use that 12GB for applications and (more
importantly) as a really big read cache?


--
Ron Johnson, Jr.
Jefferson LA USA

How does being physically handicapped make me Differently-Abled?
What different abilities do I have?


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-10-2008, 07:27 AM
Adrian Chapela
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Ron Johnson escribió:

On 12/09/08 03:49, kj wrote:

Anoop Aryal wrote:

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

It will make all the difference on a box with 16GB. On a 32bit
machine, you can use a PAE enabled kernel to allow the operating
system to address all the memory, but you're still stuck with a 4GB
per-process limit, which means if this will be a dedicated MySQL
server, you're wasting 12GB of memory.


Why wouldn't Linux use that 12GB for applications and (more
importantly) as a really big read cache?
Hardware and Software limitation. MySQL 32bits version can't use more
than 2 GB of memory. It can't use 4 GB even using PAE.



--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 
Old 12-10-2008, 10:34 AM
kj
 
Default Server for Debian + MySQL

Ron Johnson wrote:

On 12/09/08 03:49, kj wrote:

Anoop Aryal wrote:

Just curious, how big of a difference (indeed, what difference) does
64bit make?

It will make all the difference on a box with 16GB. On a 32bit
machine, you can use a PAE enabled kernel to allow the operating
system to address all the memory, but you're still stuck with a 4GB
per-process limit, which means if this will be a dedicated MySQL
server, you're wasting 12GB of memory.


Why wouldn't Linux use that 12GB for applications and (more
importantly) as a really big read cache?




If the box is a dedicated DB server, then there aren't (shouldn't be)
any other applications running other than the essentials. Of curse the
kernel would do what the kernel does, but it makes more sense to have
MySQL use that memory for caches/buffers dedicated to its own purposes,
for example, caching query results. So again, the per-process memory
limit is a disadvantage.



--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 03:13 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org