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Old 10-30-2008, 03:02 PM
"H.S."
 
Default working with svn copy on two machines

Hello,

I am working on a project which I have hosted as a repository on our
university's network. The repository is in my home directory.

Now, I either work in my lab at the univ. or from home. Till now I have
been using my univ. computer only for svn commands (update, commit,
etc.) where I had checked out a working copy. And I just rsync from my
lab machine to my home machine when I want to work from home and then
rsync back to update my lab machine. The
rsync command I use at home is this:
$> rsync -auCvze ssh ./ labmachine:~/project/

However, this way I cannot give svn commands at my home machine. It
would be nice to do so though. Basically, only my lab machine is the
working copy in this situation.

I tried checking out a working copy at both the machines. But if I use
rsync after that to sync my changes between the two machines before I am
in a position to commit, rsync wants to copy over many files, including
the ones I have not modified at all.

What do others do in such a situation? Sorry if this is a basic
question. I am relatively new to SVN.

I am trying to see if there is a way such that I can use both my lab
machine and home machine copies of the source code as working copies.
The way I understand is that when I am in the middle of some change, I
will have to commit back from home or lab in that unfinished state,
update my copy at home or lab and then continue working. Is this what is
commonly done in such situations?

Or perhaps there is way to rsync between two working copies while I am
working on an unfinished change?

Hope I am clear in the query.

Thanks,
Regards.

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Old 10-30-2008, 05:46 PM
Kamaraju S Kusumanchi
 
Default working with svn copy on two machines

H.S. wrote:

> The
> rsync command I use at home is this:
> $> rsync -auCvze ssh ./ labmachine:~/project/

I use
$ rsync -avzp source destination

>
> However, this way I cannot give svn commands at my home machine. It
> would be nice to do so though. Basically, only my lab machine is the
> working copy in this situation.

If you synchronize the .svn directories, then I think you can run svn
commands from the home machine as well.


>
> I tried checking out a working copy at both the machines. But if I use
> rsync after that to sync my changes between the two machines before I am
> in a position to commit, rsync wants to copy over many files, including
> the ones I have not modified at all.
>

rsync looks at the time stamps. But transfers only the changes between the
files. So, you might not be transferring much data across the network.

> I am trying to see if there is a way such that I can use both my lab
> machine and home machine copies of the source code as working copies.
> The way I understand is that when I am in the middle of some change, I
> will have to commit back from home or lab in that unfinished state,
> update my copy at home or lab and then continue working. Is this what is
> commonly done in such situations?

You can also take a look at sshfs. Using this you can mount your lab
machines' directory on your home machine. After that you can use the
mounted directory as if it is a local directory. Everything is done over
ssh. You do not need any special permissions on the lab machine. All you
need is root access on your home machine (to setup the sshfs), ssh access
to your lab machine.


>
> Or perhaps there is way to rsync between two working copies while I am
> working on an unfinished change?

In my case, I have the same username on all of my machines. I do not know if
it matters (like... Does rsync care about user names?). Just wanted to let
you know...

raju
--
Kamaraju S Kusumanchi
http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/kk288/
http://malayamaarutham.blogspot.com/


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Old 11-02-2008, 09:24 AM
John Allen
 
Default working with svn copy on two machines

H.S. wrote:

Hello,

I am working on a project which I have hosted as a repository on our
university's network. The repository is in my home directory.

Now, I either work in my lab at the univ. or from home. Till now I have
been using my univ. computer only for svn commands (update, commit,
etc.) where I had checked out a working copy. And I just rsync from my
lab machine to my home machine when I want to work from home and then
rsync back to update my lab machine. The
rsync command I use at home is this:
$> rsync -auCvze ssh ./ labmachine:~/project/

However, this way I cannot give svn commands at my home machine. It
would be nice to do so though. Basically, only my lab machine is the
working copy in this situation.

I tried checking out a working copy at both the machines. But if I use
rsync after that to sync my changes between the two machines before I am
in a position to commit, rsync wants to copy over many files, including
the ones I have not modified at all.

What do others do in such a situation? Sorry if this is a basic
question. I am relatively new to SVN.

I am trying to see if there is a way such that I can use both my lab
machine and home machine copies of the source code as working copies.
The way I understand is that when I am in the middle of some change, I
will have to commit back from home or lab in that unfinished state,
update my copy at home or lab and then continue working. Is this what is
commonly done in such situations?


Yes. Do not use rsync. Only use svn, and commit after working, and
update on the other machine to get the changes.

Or perhaps there is way to rsync between two working copies while I am
working on an unfinished change?

Hope I am clear in the query.

Thanks,
Regards.





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Old 11-02-2008, 10:39 AM
oneman
 
Default working with svn copy on two machines

On 2-nov-2008, at 11:24, John Allen wrote:


H.S. wrote:

<snip>

I am trying to see if there is a way such that I can use both my lab
machine and home machine copies of the source code as working copies.
The way I understand is that when I am in the middle of some
change, I

will have to commit back from home or lab in that unfinished state,
update my copy at home or lab and then continue working. Is this
what is

commonly done in such situations?


Yes. Do not use rsync. Only use svn, and commit after working, and
update on the other machine to get the changes.


Or, if you don't like having a gazillion intermediate commits in your
trunk, you could also create a branch an work on that. You'd commit
the intermediate changes in the branch and merge it in trunk when
you've completed a task, keeping your trunk's history clean.


Peter


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Old 11-02-2008, 02:31 PM
"H.S."
 
Default working with svn copy on two machines

oneman wrote:
>
> On 2-nov-2008, at 11:24, John Allen wrote:
>>>
>> Yes. Do not use rsync. Only use svn, and commit after working, and
>> update on the other machine to get the changes.
>
> Or, if you don't like having a gazillion intermediate commits in your
> trunk, you could also create a branch an work on that. You'd commit the
> intermediate changes in the branch and merge it in trunk when you've
> completed a task, keeping your trunk's history clean.
>
> Peter
>
>

Yup, this looks like a better method; it is clean. I will give this a try.

Thanks to everyone who responded.
Regards.

--

Please reply to this list only. I read this list on its corresponding
newsgroup on gmane.org. Replies sent to my email address are just
filtered to a folder in my mailbox and get periodically deleted without
ever having been read.


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