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Old 10-28-2008, 04:53 AM
 
Default memory

Hi,*I am building a PC desktop computer*using the EVGA 790i motherboard*(Intel based, DDR3, 64 bit, quad core 2.66ghz processor). I will be using adobe creative suite 2 (soon upgrade to suite4) for my graphic design business. I would like to know how much memory does debian gnu/linux OS supports? I am currently using windows XP on a compaq presario and it only supports 4gb*of memory(for 32 bit and 64 bit motherboards).*The PC I am building*has 8gb of memory*using 4 corsair memory/ram cards to install. I*like to weigh*my options*for an OS other than vista (business and*ultimate supports 128gb of memory on 64 bit, DDR3*motherboard)? Any information you can give will be greatly appreciated!!
 
Old 10-28-2008, 05:25 AM
Celejar
 
Default memory

On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 05:53:19 +0000
chall67@bellsouth.net wrote:

> Hi, I am building a PC desktop computer using the EVGA 790i motherboard (Intel based, DDR3, 64 bit, quad core 2.66ghz processor). I will be using adobe creative suite 2 (soon upgrade to suite4) for my graphic design business. I would like to know how much memory does debian gnu/linux OS supports? I am currently using windows XP on a compaq presario and it only supports 4gb of memory(for 32 bit and 64 bit motherboards). The PC I am building has 8gb of memory using 4 corsair memory/ram cards to install. I like to weigh my options for an OS other than vista (business and ultimate supports 128gb of memory on 64 bit, DDR3 motherboard)? Any information you can give will be greatly appreciated!!

Linux apparently supports up to 64GB with HIGHMEM kernels:

http://kerneltrap.org/node/2450

GIYF for questions like this.

Celejar
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Old 10-28-2008, 06:20 AM
Steven Vancoillie
 
Default memory

On Tuesday 28 October 2008 06:53:19 chall67@bellsouth.net wrote:
> Hi, I am building a PC desktop computer using the EVGA 790i motherboard (Intel based, DDR3, 64 bit, quad core 2.66ghz processor). I will be using adobe creative suite 2 (soon upgrade to suite4) for my graphic design business. I would like to know how much memory does debian gnu/linux OS supports? I am currently using windows XP on a compaq presario and it only supports 4gb of memory(for 32 bit and 64 bit motherboards). The PC I am building has 8gb of memory using 4 corsair memory/ram cards to install. I like to weigh my options for an OS other than vista (business and ultimate supports 128gb of memory on 64 bit, DDR3 motherboard)? Any information you can give will be greatly appreciated!!
>

http://www.debian.org/ports/amd64/

so up to 128 TiB
 
Old 01-24-2010, 03:10 AM
Roman Gelfand
 
Default Memory

What happens when debian is out of memory? Does it freeze? Is there
any trace of memory glut in log files?

Thanks in advance


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Old 01-24-2010, 05:51 AM
"Todd A. Jacobs"
 
Default Memory

On Sat, Jan 23, 2010 at 11:10:51PM -0500, Roman Gelfand wrote:

> What happens when debian is out of memory? Does it freeze? Is there
> any trace of memory glut in log files?

It depends. In general, you will either see disk thrashing as swap is
constantly accessed, or the oom-killer will start terminating candidate
processes.

Unless you're running sar or similar, you won't get much info from your
log files about this sort of thing. Running Apache on a 256MB box
without some low-memory tweaks is a great way to experience this sort of
thing first-hand.

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Old 01-24-2010, 06:37 AM
Freeman
 
Default Memory

On Sat, Jan 23, 2010 at 11:10:51PM -0500, Roman Gelfand wrote:
> What happens when debian is out of memory? Does it freeze? Is there
> any trace of memory glut in log files?
>
> Thanks in advance
>

Writes to a swap file on your drive. Or a swap file on your ram drive in
memory if you have one.

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Freeman


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Old 01-24-2010, 05:17 PM
"Todd A. Jacobs"
 
Default Memory

On Sat, Jan 23, 2010 at 11:37:41PM -0800, Freeman wrote:

> Writes to a swap file on your drive. Or a swap file on your ram drive
> in memory if you have one.

There are probably some edge cases where a swap file on a RAM drive is
valid, but I can't think of any that don't involve misbehaving apps that
want to manage their own swapping rather than letting the kernel do it.

The whole point of swap is to trade disk I/O for RAM, so swapping to RAM
disk seems rather self-defeating. What's your use case for this?

--
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Old 01-24-2010, 06:08 PM
"Boyd Stephen Smith Jr."
 
Default Memory

On Saturday 23 January 2010 22:10:51 Roman Gelfand wrote:
> What happens when debian is out of memory?

The Linux kernel has two main ways to deal with an OOM situation.

The most commonly encountered in the oom-killer. Sometimes, a request for a
memory mapping is assigned an address, but is not immediately reserved in
physical RAM. (This is called an "overcommit".) When a new page is accessed,
an RAM assignment is allocated. If there is no space in RAM, swappable pages
are written to disk and freed from RAM to mark room. If there is no swap
space available, the oom-killer chooses a process (based on a number of
heuristics) and terminates it rather aggressively, freeing the memory
allocated for it. This choose+terminate process may be repeated until the
currently running process is terminated (and therefore, doesn't need the
memory), or the paging request can be satisfied.

Also encountered is a more "traditional" memory allocation failure. In this
case the kernel receives a request for more memory and attempts to allocate it
RAM immediately. If the RAM can be allocated without involving the oom-
killer, the request succeeds. Otherwise, the system call fails and the
application may handle it "gracefully" (or not; application specific).

> Does it freeze?

The kernel will not. It may terminate if process 1 is killed, but it should
not freeze. Applications could. They might be waiting for data from a
process the oom-killer terminates. The might enter a loop expecting the
system call to succeed after some period of time.

> Is there
> any trace of memory glut in log files?

I believe the oom-killer does emit a syslog message when it terminates a
process. There is no message from the kernel when the memory allocation
system call fails, the application is expected to handle any reporting that
needs to be done in that case.

Check the manpage for proc in section 5. It describes various kernel
settings. The two most applicable to memory management in low-memory
situations are /proc/sys/vm/overcommit_memory and
/proc/sys/vm/overcommit_ratio.

I detest the very idea of "overcommit" which arguably violates several decades
of C, POSIX, and SUS documentation. So, I prefer
/proc/sys/vm/overcommit_memory = 2 and /proc/sys/vm/overcommit_ratio between
80 and 100, inclusive.
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Old 01-24-2010, 09:42 PM
Freeman
 
Default Memory

On Sun, Jan 24, 2010 at 10:17:47AM -0800, Todd A. Jacobs wrote:
> On Sat, Jan 23, 2010 at 11:37:41PM -0800, Freeman wrote:
>
> > Writes to a swap file on your drive. Or a swap file on your ram drive
> > in memory if you have one.
>
> There are probably some edge cases where a swap file on a RAM drive is
> valid, but I can't think of any that don't involve misbehaving apps that
> want to manage their own swapping rather than letting the kernel do it.
>
> The whole point of swap is to trade disk I/O for RAM, so swapping to RAM
> disk seems rather self-defeating. What's your use case for this?
>

A misbegotten attempt at humor!

However, I did see a case once. Maybe not sure how meritable it is.

The OP conjectured that less available memory would cause etch (or maybe
apps) to manage memory more aggressively.

--
Kind Regards,
Freeman


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