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Old 10-03-2008, 05:28 AM
Alex Samad
 
Default House wireless/wired router: choices? Plus wireless neophyte questions.

On Fri, Oct 03, 2008 at 01:46:48AM -0400, Chris Metzler wrote:
>
> Hi folks. Been a looooong time since I've posted to this list.
>
> I have exactly zero experience with wireless -- I've never owned a laptop,
> and have just never needed it. My gf, as part of her job, needs to bring
> home a laptop with that other OS on it, and wants wireless access to
> our broadband.
>
> We currently have a DSL connection: phone to DSL modem, ethernet out the
> back of the DSL modem to our one desktop machine. I'm assuming that what
> I want is a wireless router with LAN ports: ethernet cable from the DSL
> modem to the wireless router, and ethernet cable from the wireless router
> to the desktop machine while her laptop talks to the router by wireless.
> We have a static IP address; I'm presuming that this wired/wireless router
> will need to be configured with that address, and then will do NAT with
> the desktop and the laptop.
>
> 1. Does what I just wrote make sense? Am I getting this correctly?

yep

two paths

1 buy the wireless router (and maybe put openwrt on it www.openwrt.org)
2 but a wireless card for your linux box and setup routing and do the
nat on your box

>
> 2. If I'm on the right track, what about IP addresses for the desktop
> and the laptop? Do I have to set them manually to addresses within
> a non-routeable block? Or do such routers typically do DHCP or something
> like that?

most home wireless routers will have the dhcp range already setup

>
> 3. What about configuring the router (with the static IP address, any
> DHCP operating parameters, etc.)? Since my desktop will be wired, I'd
> like to be able to configure the router using my desktop -- which means
> using Linux. If an application on an accompanying DVD is needed to
> configure the router, I'm guessing that app is only going to work on
> that other operating system. Or are there routers out there that are
> configurable from a Linux machine in a straightforward manner?

most are web based, the windows setup apps help to locate not actually
needed to configure (from my exposure)

>
> 4. (most important) For someone moderately competent who somehow
> has made it this far without learning much about wireless, what would
> you suggest I read? Googling turns up thousands of pages of FAQs and
> HOWTOs and so on (some of which are ancient -- but that doesn't mean
> they're not useful, of course). There's lots of stuff out there;
> but being ignorant, I don't know enough to know what's relevant and
> what's out of date. What would *you* suggest I read?
>

have a look at openwrt.org lots of people doing what you are trying to
do

> Thanks much for any info,
>
> -c
>
>
> --
> Chris Metzler cmetzler@speakeasy.snip-me.net
> (remove "snip-me." to email)
>
> "As a child I understood how to give; I have forgotten this grace since I
> have become civilized." - Chief Luther Standing Bear



--
"I think --tide turning --see, as I remember --I was raised in the desert, but tides kind of --it's easy to see a tide turn --did I say those words?"

- George W. Bush
06/14/2006
Washington, DC
in response to the question "Is the tide turning in Iraq?"
 
Old 10-03-2008, 04:49 PM
Bob McGowan
 
Default House wireless/wired router: choices? Plus wireless neophyte questions.

On Fri, 2008-10-03 at 09:15 -0500, Ron Johnson wrote:
> On 10/03/08 00:46, Chris Metzler wrote:
> > Hi folks. Been a looooong time since I've posted to this list.
> >
> > I have exactly zero experience with wireless -- I've never owned a laptop,
> > and have just never needed it. My gf, as part of her job, needs to bring
> > home a laptop with that other OS on it, and wants wireless access to
> > our broadband.
> >
> > We currently have a DSL connection: phone to DSL modem, ethernet out the
> > back of the DSL modem to our one desktop machine. I'm assuming that what
> > I want is a wireless router with LAN ports: ethernet cable from the DSL
> > modem to the wireless router, and ethernet cable from the wireless router
> > to the desktop machine while her laptop talks to the router by wireless.
> > We have a static IP address; I'm presuming that this wired/wireless router
> > will need to be configured with that address, and then will do NAT with
> > the desktop and the laptop.
>
> Yes. My router gets a routable "external" IP address from the ISP,
> but I had to *also* give it an "internal", non-routable IP address
> (which I chose to be 192.168.1.251).
>
> Look for the Linksys WRT54GL. Natively runs Linux, and replacement
> OSs (like OpenWRT or Tomato) can easily be installed.
>
<--deleted discussion on setup questions-->

I had some trouble finding the above referenced router at a local
retailer (I needed the HW ASAP, couldn't wait for freight delivery).

I found that Netgear also makes a Linux kernel based router, the
WGR614L. It is listed at about $80 US, and can use the DD-WRT Open
Source firmware, probably others.

Though I've not yet tried to do anything with the alternate drivers yet,
I expect to do so soon. But even the basic Netgear fw and function are
good.

The main drawback is there's no 802.11n support. For me, not an issue,
all my equipment was G anyway.

This unit (and others) allows you to associate a particular IP address
with a MAC address, so the same IP is always given to the device. This
allows you to have your hosts file setup for names and still use the
laptop in any DHCP environment with changes.

Bob McGowan


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Old 10-04-2008, 05:58 AM
Andrei Popescu
 
Default House wireless/wired router: choices? Plus wireless neophyte questions.

On Fri,03.Oct.08, 01:46:48, Chris Metzler wrote:

[...]

One detail not mentioned here was that you should use WPA2 encryption to
protect your wireless network. WEP is easy to crack with standard Linux
tools. As far as I recall the XP version of the other OS needs at least
SP2 (or was that SP3?) to use WPA2.

As for choice of wireless routers, I have used a D-Link DI-524 for a
while with no problems (using the standard firmware). That box is now at
my mom's house and I'm planning on getting the Asus WL-500g Premium,
which has a lot of nice features, but is more expensive. Maybe it would
be interesting for you to look for a model with integrated DSL modem?

Regards,
Andrei
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.
(Albert Einstein)
 
Old 10-04-2008, 04:38 PM
Andrei Popescu
 
Default House wireless/wired router: choices? Plus wireless neophyte questions.

On Sat,04.Oct.08, 10:26:56, Jack Schneider wrote:

> Doesn't WPA2 require access to a Radius server..?
>
> My Cisco seems to...

My previous router could do WPA2-PSK (pre-shared key).

Regards,
Andrei
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.
(Albert Einstein)
 
Old 10-05-2008, 09:17 AM
Paul Johnson
 
Default House wireless/wired router: choices? Plus wireless neophyte questions.

On Fri, 2008-10-03 at 10:10 -0400, Celejar wrote:

> They always (AFAIK) offer DHCP, but you don't have to use it. There are
> advantages to setting static IPs - you can set up host files and refer
> to the hosts by name, and I think that bringing up interfaces is a good
> few seconds quicker with static IPs than with DHCP.

Any quality firmware (dd-wrt, tomato) will set up hostnames for you
anyway, based on the hostname the DHCP client gives it.

> > 3. What about configuring the router (with the static IP address, any
> > DHCP operating parameters, etc.)? Since my desktop will be wired, I'd
> > like to be able to configure the router using my desktop -- which means
> > using Linux. If an application on an accompanying DVD is needed to
> > configure the router, I'm guessing that app is only going to work on
> > that other operating system. Or are there routers out there that are
> > configurable from a Linux machine in a straightforward manner?
>
> AFAIK, SOHO routers / APs / switches are generally configurable via a
> web interface, which will work with any platform. Note, though, that
> they often recommend, or even require, Javascript, which can make using
> a TUI browser such as links difficult or impossible.

Another reason to use a firmware other than the default that the SOHO
router ships with.

--
Paul Johnson
baloo@ursine.ca
 

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